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My new super rigid flycutter

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  • My new super rigid flycutter

    I tried the design out that I talked about before, I wanted to keep the cutter as close to the collet as possible, I also went with a half inch tool holder and a real nice valenite insert, I tried it out and was very pleased.









    The near mirror finish on the piece of steel speaks for itself




    Now the question to you guys, To dunk or not to dunk? Its made of 11-17,

    should I heat her up and throw her into the cutting fluid to put a skin on her or leave it soft?

  • #2
    That looks real nice Boomer. I have been thinking of making another myself along those lines.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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    • #3
      Couple more pics

      She's only got .018" clearance!!! I didnt think this would be a problem as im just going to be using it to clean up surfaces and not hog on stuff, I got kinda worried when my friend said i might still have chip probs.







      Then I found this yesterday in my JTS catalog







      I think it will be fine



      So should I dunk it and made it look like the color of SJ's stuff?

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      • #4
        Cold blue it if you want and just leave it as is. This way if you figure out you need more clearance on the bottom than that (I tend to think you might), you don't have to start all over

        Paul
        Paul Carpenter
        Mapleton, IL

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        • #5
          Hi,

          I've got 5 or 6 similar tools of various sizes. All are made from 1018 and soft. The oldest are maybe 12 to 14 years old and all have held up very well.

          dalee
          If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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          • #6
            Good job AK,too pretty to use thou
            I just need one more tool,just one!

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            • #7
              Nice work,

              What inserts would you buy for the one shown in the catalog if used on Aluminum?

              -SD:

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              • #8
                Oddly, the description in the catalog picture says it uses RNMG and TNMG inserts.....round...and tri-angular. My guess is that there is a little angle to the slot for the arm such that only one end touches and that one end of the bar takes one type of insert and the other end takes the other. The round inserts have the up-side of getting you lots of cutting faces since its a continouous round surface. With the shallow cuts of a flycutter, that should allow for *lots* of indexes before an insert is toast. It also makes for a huge "tip" radius compared to the typical triangular insert. I would guess it makes for a very nice finish indeed.

                Paul
                Paul Carpenter
                Mapleton, IL

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                • #9
                  If you are only using it for skim passes on aluminum and NOTHING else, get a PCD insert. They're expensive, 75-125 bucks each, but they will last for years on a finishing flycutter. Every machinist at work has a flycutter with PCD in it, and the oldest insert of the bunch is seven years old and still going strong. Set it up so the faintest amount of dust comes off the machine, and you will be pleased. It's impossible to beat a flycut PCD finish on aluminum in a milling machine without spending tremendous amounts of money.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks fella's, Im hoping i can get by with these inserts for aluminum --- Im just stoked to be able to build a tool -- tools can help build other tools, those tools can then in turn build even more tools, pretty soon theres nothing that can stop you ---- then the world will be mine --- all mine ---Bwaahhhahahha

                    (did i just say all that outloud? )

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                    • #11
                      I have two PCD inserts that I use for aluminum and bronze. I used to have three but hit a forgotten setscrew when boring a pulley.

                      They really do leave an excellent finish and also have much less tendency to chatter.

                      that should allow for *lots* of indexes before an insert is toast.
                      I managed to kill one of the tips on the ceramic insert that I put on my fly cutter. It took repeated interrupted cuts on a section of very hard cast iron. Then I discovered tonight that a silicon nitride ceramic insert can be resharpened using a Cubic Boron Nitride wheel.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #12
                        looks good.

                        .018" clearance... If your flycutting plastic wouldn't you be limited to .018" cut? I'll flycut .125" with my flycutter in plastic. Gotta wear a faceshield!

                        Having said that, my flycutter wouldn't come close to the surface finish your getting.

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                        • #13
                          HM, Thats kinda the misconception of it though, actually im only limited to the hight of the insert (over a half inch depth of cut) ((not that id ever go there with a flycutter unless cutting styrofoam ))

                          You have to start cutting somewhere away from the part and feed into it anyways, so when you do you self plow your proper clearance, The big worry would be a strong chip getting between the clearancing, but what I noticed is this thing throws EVERYTHING outward, and even if it didnt and I was taking a pretty good DOC I would be babying the feed rate accordingly (so chips should remain small and or pliable)-- From what iv seen so far I cant see a problem but time will tell. Thanks for the input.
                          Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 02-14-2008, 11:25 AM.

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                          • #14
                            good point... Now that I look you'd have to plunge in for it to be an issue. Or, feeding REALLY fast!

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                            • #15
                              Save your spindle bearings and don't try to take a pass any deeper than the standard chipload for that insert (usually the dimension that takes it just deep enough for the removed material to be in the chipbreaker groove. Go any deeper than that and I would suggest it will start hammering badly.

                              I figure flycutters are for producing a flat surface and not for hogging off stock anyway. Edit-- you do however, want some clearance underneath so you don't start scratching up the surface of your work with the swarf you remove.

                              Paul
                              Paul Carpenter
                              Mapleton, IL

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