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How to make a steady in under 1 hour

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  • How to make a steady in under 1 hour

    No machining needed, two drills, one tap and a file.


    First off talk to your locak friendly laser cutter and collect said parts.




    Then start to assemble.

    Begin with one top and one bottom.



    Then assemble the middle parts.





    Then assemble the other top and bottom pieces.



    Clamp, drill tap as necessary and fit pins, bolts and / or rivits to suit.

    Drill the ends of the fingers to accept ball races or get them made out of brass or bronze.
    File the laser cutting marks on the bottom and drill for the holding bolt.

    Bingo, one large capacity steady, custom made for your lathe at a lesser cost than a casting and no machining needed.

    DON'T ASK ABOUT THE 4TH FINGER..........................



    .
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    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.




  • #2
    What's the fourth finger for,John?
    Hans

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    • #3
      How do you add the patina?

      And whats up with the fourth finger?

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      • #4
        Nice work. Those parts would make a great DIY Kit.
        To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

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        • #5
          At work we have a big one that was made alot like that. It takes 2 guys to put it on the lathe but if you need to thread a piece of 12" pipe 8 feet long its the only way to go.

          The stock steady for that lathe has about an 8" limit.

          Im going to make my own for my smithy when the time comes.

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          • #6
            Nice work. Those parts would make a great DIY Kit.
            Yup...then you just make the base and clamp to fit your lathe bed.....the hard work is done.

            Sir John...you hearing dollar (or Pound) signs yet?

            Paul
            Paul Carpenter
            Mapleton, IL

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            • #7
              Cool! I'm interested in getting 1 of the 4th fingers. What would that set me back and what do you do with them? As a rookie machinist, is it something I absolutly have to have or should I wait till I get a top of the line Rung Fu?
              - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
              Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

              It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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              • #8
                I think that 4th finger is for flipping off other people who use your lathe

                Seriously though, depending on the laser cutting costs, there could be a market for this. I am in the process of helping my uncle find a lathe. The missing steady rest problem is a common issue. Often its solved by modifying one for some other mystery lathe, or by watching Ebay for the right animal...or even home making one. However, the latter is sometimes a bigger project than it should be for something that gets used once in a while...and often a real chore. In this case, some rapid cut sheet stock parts could take a lot of work out of the project.

                Paul
                Paul Carpenter
                Mapleton, IL

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                • #9
                  Nice
                  I like it, but only one laser here, and they are $$ and very slow!
                  eddie
                  please visit my webpage:
                  http://motorworks88.webs.com/

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pcarpenter
                    Yup...then you just make the base and clamp to fit your lathe bed.....the hard work is done.

                    Sir John...you hearing dollar (or Pound) signs yet?

                    Paul
                    It's a work in progress.
                    On this one it's for a Myford and there is no base because the Myford has flat shears and the tongue at the bottom is about 20 thou bigger than the inside width of the shears, hence the use of the file.

                    Forgot about the clamp but that's a simple piece, the idea is to get this to fit, modify the DXF files and get some cut.

                    This set was too expensive to get a decent return on but talking to the laser cutters dropping from 8mm to 6mm will virtually half the costs.

                    That will give a total width of 18mm or a tad under 3/4" which for a Myford is ample given that this steady will take 5-1/2" diameter, something none of the others can.

                    Once sorted this can be offered as a kit for the UK guys, shipping to the US may be a bitch but depends on the weight of the 6mm version.

                    Like Mike I also have one for the big TOS that's been shown on here before. Built up the same way but 4 slices of 10mm thick plate and tapped for 24mm screws.



                    This one has the vee's cut in with the laser as well, That's a 12" rule between the fingers.

                    The design can be altered to suit any machine that's lacking a fixed steady.

                    .

                    .
                    .

                    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                    • #11
                      I am ashamed of you John Stevenson that lovely lathe needs a lick of green paint and quick otherwise very good workmanship your old pal Jock mctavish errr Alistair
                      Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                      • #12


                        Something was missing John.
                        Not sure how best to indicate in tho...

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                        • #13
                          What's the bloody forth finger for, you started this John, now fess up.
                          The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                          Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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                          • #14
                            John, This being Valentine's day, I thought you were going to tell us how to impress a date so she'll go out again.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by loose nut
                              What's the bloody forth finger for, you started this John, now fess up.
                              OK I *ucked up and told then to cut 4 fingers but forgot this was a three finger steady

                              .
                              .

                              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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