Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

how do you sharpen you lathe tooling?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • how do you sharpen you lathe tooling?

    do you have a sequence of operations? Such as do the side first to such and such degrees and then the top and then the rake? It would be helpful to have some guidelines like that for me as a beginner, I am having a bit of difficulty with the pictures in the SB book. thanks.

  • #2
    I rotate my insert to present a fresh edge
    No shimming for edge height, re-zeroing for the center zero etc. etc.

    Nick

    Comment


    • #3
      Just about any intro machine shop text will have a set of photos showing the sequence of grinding operations on a pedestal grinder.

      The South Bend "How To Run a Lathe" has a good section on grinding lathe tools, as does Moltrecht's Machine Shop Practice.
      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

      Comment


      • #4
        brockey1

        Have patience Keith, the books WILL arrive Peter
        The difficult done right away. the impossible takes a little time.

        Comment


        • #5
          Lath tool grinding.

          Originally posted by kjbllc
          do you have a sequence of operations? Such as do the side first to such and such degrees and then the top and then the rake? It would be helpful to have some guidelines like that for me as a beginner, I am having a bit of difficulty with the pictures in the SB book. thanks.
          Hi kjbllc

          To the question and then to the point.

          First of all, do keep water at hand for 2 reasons:
          - to stop over-heating the tool as that may damage its cutting qualities: and
          - it gets bloody hot and uncomfortable on your hands/fingers -as you've probably discovered for yourself.

          Start off with a "fresh" wheel if possible. Not a new wheel but one that has been "dressed" so as to "true it up" and present/have a better/"sharper" cutting action.

          The reality is that when you are roughing the shape of the tool out, whether the grinder is grinding away from the cutting edge is not important - at all.

          The better the cutting edge, the better the cut - so finish off with a finer grinding wheel and then a diamond hand-lap "stick" (available for moderate cost from most better hard-ware stores). Again push/move the "stick" "away" from the cutting edge as before.

          When finishing, the sequence doesn't matter either, but it is best to have the wheel grinding away from the cutting edge on each face - that is say have the cutting edge at the top facing you and the wheel grinding "down" - you will get a naturally sharper edge that way.

          Needless to say, just about every metal has different optimum tool and cutting edge shapes/profiles.

          I can post a basic list of diagrams and shapes etc. later if you wish.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by lazlo
            Just about any intro machine shop text will have a set of photos showing the sequence of grinding operations on a pedestal grinder.

            The South Bend "How To Run a Lathe" has a good section on grinding lathe tools, as does Moltrecht's Machine Shop Practice.

            books on the way, I am going by the south bend book and having a bit of difficulty transferring what I see to what to do I guess. It doesn't really give you the angle of the cut, just the picture. The top view and such. If I knew what the angle for mild steel would be I could set the wheel up that way to start. Do you guys just freehand the whole thing? Just from experience?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by brockley1
              Have patience Keith, the books WILL arrive Peter
              you are right of course, when your in focus on something its hard sometimes.

              Comment


              • #8
                did a google and found this:

                http://www.sherline.com/grinding.htm

                Comment


                • #9
                  Just remember when you quench the tool in water to leave it in the water as long as you held it on the stone. I suggest no gloves so you can feel the bit starting to get warm and you won't get it too hot if using bare fingers.

                  I can help you with the thread cutting bit pretty quick. Set your tool rest at 10 degrees and then use your adjustable square set to 30 degrees for each side of the bit. Don't forget to take off the very tip of the cutter if you want your threads to look nicer.

                  If I were you I wouldn't be trying to learn how to sharpen all the basic shapes at once. Just start with the left or right and work with it till you got it down pat and then move onto the other. If you don't have enough blanks then buy more. I got 20 HSS 5/16" blanks from ENCO for something like 1 dollar apiece.
                  - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                  Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                  It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    good point YOD, I have some to start with, I have been doing some cutting and they are working, but the finish is very rough. I thought It might be the way the blade was sharpened. That is what got me to start this thread. I actually have something to make but it has to be smooth, Its a shaft for an old craftsman band saw, the guide part. thanks for the advice

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      kjbllc,

                      Did you download the video "Action, use and care of single point cutting tools"?

                      http://www.shinyobjectdesign.com/staff/paul/sbvideo/

                      If you can't download it from that site then email me an email address and I will send it to you.

                      Mike
                      Last edited by Mike Burdick; 02-15-2008, 08:28 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mike Burdick
                        kjbllc,

                        Did you download the video "Action, use and care of single point cutting tools"?

                        http://www.shinyobjectdesign.com/staff/paul/sbvideo/

                        If you can't download it from this site then email me an email address that I can send it to you.

                        Mike
                        mike I wish I could, but my connection is only 25kbps, I get timed out on videos. I will try to get a friend to download it to a disc. thanks

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          ha, I just looked at the page 89 meg! It took me 6 hours to download a 8 meg file once.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mike Burdick
                            kjbllc,

                            Did you download the video "Action, use and care of single point cutting tools"?

                            http://www.shinyobjectdesign.com/staff/paul/sbvideo/

                            If you can't download it from that site then email me an email address and I will send it to you.

                            Mike
                            Thanks for the offer of mailing to me that is a kind gesture. I think my friend with the cable internet can do it for me. thanks so much for the thought.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              kjbllc,

                              What size bits are you using? I would think the best thing to start out with is a post and rocker tool holder and 1/4-inch bits. They grind fast and are inexpensive. Then...remember one thing: The cutting edge of the bit MUST be the only edge that hits the metal! Anything else will rub. Don't be concerned with an "exact" angle. So start grinding and testing...you'll learn fast! No fooling!

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X