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  • Question Keyless chuck

    Wore out the chuck on my Taiwanese Farm store 5/8" drill press after 25 years and shopping for a new chuck. Satisfied with quality of CDCO.com tools advertised in Home Shop Machinist that I've bought so far so looked there. Never used a keyless (precision?) machinist chuck. Guess they must have about a grillion threads/ inch to hold. Would like one for small light work but also need to use a 1" reduced shank drill in some gnarly steel once in a while.

    Drill has #2 Morse spindle. Would be OK to have more than one chuck but haven't been able to. I chuck up a little rubber core drum sander in it occasionally and the side load usually knocked the MT spindle loose. Finally glued it in with Loctite. Wouldn't want to get out the hot wrench every time to swap chucks.

    Any thoughts?

    Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    Got to be careful with keyless chucks and big bits, they will overtighten themselves to destruction if not careful. For S&D bits with a 1/2 shank consider making a mt2 adapter that holds the shanks with set screws. It will work for all of you S&D drills and reclaim a lot of Z over a chuck as well.
    James Kilroy

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    • #3
      I love my keyless chucks. In fact, I need to finally get around to replacing the lathe tailstock chuck with one so I'll be 100% keyless.

      They can tighten up on big Silver and Demings. I find a couple strap wrenches are useful to gently undo such messes without unduly harassing the knurling on the chuck.

      The other thing I found was a tendency to twist really hard to wrong way to loosen the chuck. ("No, your other left stoopid!") Eventually I overcame that learning disability, but the strap wrenches helped out there too. I nearly had to resort to marking the "loosen" direction in the wife's hot pink nail varnish. Fortunately I snapped to before having to resort to such dastardly measures.

      I feel for ya on the side load issue. I haven't yet had to apply Loctite. I use the freezer+oven trick to get a shrink fit. It's quick and easy.

      RE CDCO, I'm sure they'd probably be fine. I've so far bought mine from Lathemaster though:

      http://www.lathemaster.com/Drill%20Chucks.htm

      Excellent, well made chucks there.

      Best,

      BW
      ---------------------------------------------------

      http://www.cnccookbook.com/index.htm
      Try G-Wizard Machinist's Calculator for free:
      http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCGWizard.html

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      • #4
        Ive got 3 of em, -- 2 from Kitts and 1 from CDCO, all the 1/2"ers. Dang, theyll practically give em to you, why not get several? I got one in the tailstock of the 12x36 lathe and often use the S&D 1/2" shanks... and yeah, they will occasionally get pretty snugged up, but not having a nice fancy 'strap wrench' like some folks, I just grab the big Channelocks (Gobblers ... handiest tool around!) and grunge away on those pretty knurls, -- hey, it only cost $22! if it gets too ugly, Ill just get another.

        Really, I think they are a great bargain and I find the run-out is very acceptable. A couple more in the smaller capacities are due to show up soon
        If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

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        • #5
          I haven't tried any from CDCO,but I do have three 5/8 keyless from Grizzly,a bit more money but well worth it.They run less than .0005" in the mill and don't over tighten even running a 1" drill.The other feature I truly appreciate is when they say 0-5/8" they mean 0",they will actually hold and run a #80 drill with no problem.
          I just need one more tool,just one!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Bill Pace
            not having a nice fancy 'strap wrench' like some folks, I just grab the big Channelocks (Gobblers ... handiest tool around!) and grunge away on those pretty knurls, -- hey, it only cost $22! if it gets too ugly, Ill just get another.
            Bill, as a card-carrying member of the International Society for Preservation of Cheap Asian Knurls (also known as ISPOCAK), I feel I must call your attention to the ready availability of precision strap wrenches on eBay. Here's one for $2.50 for example: 140206261367

            I recognize this is an enormous expenditure of capital, but in truth, I believe the destruction of cheap knurls is often accompanied by accelerated respiration from over exertion, resulting in a dramatic increase in personal CO2 emissions. Worse, if you have eaten beans or other legumes immediately prior to the application of significant torque, there may be methane emissions as well, which are hundreds of times worse as greenhouse gasses go. These are the same gasses that have so damaged our fragile planet's ecosystem with Global Warming, and we can ill-afford to further compound the effects.

            I feel sure that Al Gore would be pleased and proud to hear that you've mended your ways, purchased a quality strap wrench, and will no longer be contributing unwanted greenhouse gases due to channel locking the snot outta yer poor dumb drill chucks. I am anticipating the launch of legislation imminently that will outlaw channel lock application to knurled surfaces in an effort to keep greenhouse emissions under control.

            Thank you for your support,

            BW
            ---------------------------------------------------

            http://www.cnccookbook.com/index.htm
            Try G-Wizard Machinist's Calculator for free:
            http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCGWizard.html

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            • #7
              The best deal I've seen on a new keyless chuck is the ~$55 1/2 Rohm Enco always has on sale. That was my first "good" keyless chuck, and it still sits on my Bridgeport tooling tray with an R8 arbor. That is an altogether fine chuck, way better than the $30 imports I've seen...

              I've not got over a dozen Albrechts, paid no more than $20 for any of them ranging from 1/8 to 1/2", some "as new", some with rust pits on the shell but work well, some well worn or junk (got a box full of them for "scrap price"). The deals are out there, if you can find them. My Chinese drill press now has a 1/2" Albrecht on it most of the time.

              But as mentioned, these keyless type are not good for Silver & Deming type bits as they can over tighten and be near impossible to remove, or even damage the chuck. If the chuck is 1/2", never run anything larger than 1/2" in it. Likewise, they won't run in reverse without loosening, so not good when that is required.

              I've got Jacobs Super Chucks (from back when they were good) that I use when the keyless is not appropriate. These can also be had for a good deal, but tend to run a bit high. However, the older "plain bearing" Jacobs chucks are VERY good and actually supposed to be lower runout than the ball bearing chucks. My monster 20" VSG has a 5/8 Jacobs 6A in it most of the time, though it gets an 18N Super Chuck for the really big straight shank drills. I bought that 6A "new in box" on ebay for ~$20 shipped... Got another "free", but it had "spun jaws". So I bought 5 sets of new jaws on ebay for $10 shipped...

              No cheap imports in my shop, and not spending a fortune either...
              Russ
              Master Floor Sweeper

              Comment


              • #8
                I bought a 1/2" keyless Bison chuck from New England Tool and Brass a couple of years ago and I LOVE IT!

                I had an issue two times with the chuck getting stuck in the open position for a short time but I was able to work it out.

                I find the run-out to be amazing, and although I was always uncertain/skeptical about their usefulness, I think they are a great addition to the mill and have substantially eased my Carpel Tunnel problems and have sped up my work.

                One of the only draw-backs is that they tend to be a bit longer so they take a little distance away from the spindle-to-table numbers.

                My two cents.

                John

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ZINOM
                  I bought a 1/2" keyless Bison chuck from New England Tool and Brass a couple of years ago and I LOVE IT!

                  John
                  Bison sure does seem to make good stuff, don't they?

                  Best,

                  BW
                  ---------------------------------------------------

                  http://www.cnccookbook.com/index.htm
                  Try G-Wizard Machinist's Calculator for free:
                  http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCGWizard.html

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Keyless Chucks in General

                    I have used them for years and love the heck out of them when you are stepping up in drill sizes from small drills to larger S&D drills. They save a lot of wear and tear on your thumb and fingers. The only drawback that I have run into is when you are using the spindle of the drill press or BP to tap a hole you have just drilled by hand. The moment you go to reverse direction to break the chip it lets go. Using a spring loaded tap center pretty much cures this. Yes, as was mentioned, larger drill shanks often get damaged by the "death grip" that a keyless chuck gets on them. For larger drills I really like the Jacobs ball bearing super chuck. Rohm makes a nice keyless, as does Rigid. I guess it just boils down to choice and availability.
                    Jim (KB4IVH)

                    Only fools abuse their tools.

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