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old Drummond lathe

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  • old Drummond lathe

    I have seen several pictures of the old Drummond round bed lathe, early 20th century, and most of them show the cross slide with a tilt. Can one of our British members or anyone else for that matter verify that and if so why. I don't have one, just interested.
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

  • #2
    Your post caused me to look at Tony's description. http://www.lathes.co.uk/drummond/page2.html shows the tilt and describes the operation. It might be unique in having the leadscrew enclosed by the round bed. That's one way to keep chips out of its threads. The carriage grabbed the leadscrew through a longitudinal slot on the bottom of the round bed.
    Last edited by aostling; 02-24-2008, 01:44 AM.
    Allan Ostling

    Phoenix, Arizona

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    • #3
      The cross slide on the Pittler B & B2 (seen here) is also able to tilt. Although the bed is trapezoid with the leadscrew inside, the saddle is effectively a cylinder which carries the slide. I had one in the shop for a while & made a 1/4 scale model.
      Mark
      What you say & what people hear is not always the same thing.
      www.remark.me.uk

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      • #4
        Hey Mark, That is one beautiful model!!!! Fred

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        • #5
          I've always wondered about the round bed drummonds and how good the tailstock accuracy was.

          Ditto on the model it looks great!

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          • #6
            You would think that a heavy load on the tool would cause the cross slide to rotate at the wrong time, but the amateurs of the time loved these machines, probably couldn't afford anything else. Thank's
            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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            • #7
              Round Bed Drummonds

              I had one! Basically, it was capable of a sort of milling with the tilting table but it was inherently weak because it had only No 1 Morse tapers. Again, it had no dials and it had no fine feeds. Finally, its headstock bearings were a half clamp0 and could snap.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by aviemoron
                I had one! Basically, it was capable of a sort of milling with the tilting table but it was inherently weak because it had only No 1 Morse tapers. Again, it had no dials and it had no fine feeds. Finally, its headstock bearings were a half clamp0 and could snap.
                And people call the imports rubbish

                .
                .

                Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                • #9
                  Round Bed Drummonds

                  Sir John makes a valid point. I had a 918 or 9180 to be exact because it had a Myford 'nose'

                  It was streets ahead of the RB Drummond and most of the pre War lathes.
                  I had or had access to the Myfords and flat bed Drummonds and the Zyto.
                  The faults of the 918 were not reasonable rigidity or build but daft things like the lowest speed of 130 rpm, that it would only screwcut right hand threads, that the top slide wouldn't do 2 MT shanks etc.
                  If the 918/9180 had had a some attention paid to addressing these omissions, it would take a far more desirous but worn Myford to the cleaners.
                  I have both the ML7 and the Super 7 but no one would take on these 918 faults at the time- and I got fed up doing modifications.
                  Sorry, gone off the named topic but someone will read this and improve matters.

                  Regards

                  Norman

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