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  • Different slant to a mill.

    Not a new idea, Hurco and Deckels have done it for years using the ram for the Y axis.

    Spotted this on my last trip to China.



    A row of SX3 based milling machines with the X axis running on the fixed base and the Y axis moving the column.

    Z is by a handwheel at the top instead of at the front and the jack shaft with bevel gears.

    Two normal SX3's in Grizzly green at the back.

    Right at the very back some of the blue and white industrial range pedestal drills with No 4 morse, geared heads and power feeds, right brutes of drills.

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    Last edited by John Stevenson; 02-25-2008, 09:27 AM.
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    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.




  • #2
    Originally posted by John Stevenson
    A row of SX3 based milling machines with the X axis running on the fixed base and the Y axis moving the column.

    Z is by a handwheel at the top instead of at the front and the jack shaft with bevel gears.

    Two normal SX3's in Grizzly green at the back.
    What's the advantage of this John? I would think that more effort would be required to move the column than the table or have I got completely the wrong end of the long woody thing?

    Al

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    • #3
      Don't know if there is an advantage or not, personally I would have thought that a bit of shake at the bottom of the column will be magnified at the tool.

      Knowing the Chinese someone has asked for this as opposed to them dreaming it up as they have more than enough worldwide orders to keep busy without getting side tracked.

      Saw some other interesting stuff but that was inside the development section and pictures were banned, only part that was.

      As this was in the factory area I though I'd post it.

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      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



      Comment


      • #4
        are you sure about that?

        you were there....but:

        it looks to me like Y handle moves the table. and the vertical column is simply clamped to the same dovetails and adjustable, (but not moved by the Y crank.)

        cant really see clearly in the photo.

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        • #5
          I am with you John in that if you attempt to make a cut in the Y axis the head would have movement in it from the ways if a heavy cut were taken. I can't see any advantage at all and see nothing but trouble as the machine wears and loosens up. It looks to be a bench top mill as well.
          It's only ink and paper

          Comment


          • #6
            think its a crateing issue

            with that sort of arangement ...you can have the same travel as a larger machine ...but when its stripped down and packed ..it fits in a smaller crate .

            all the best.markj

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by dsergison
              it looks to me like Y handle moves the table. and the vertical column is simply clamped to the same dovetails and adjustable, (but not moved by the Y crank.)
              -Probably it; look close, the column has "saddle locks" on the dovetail.

              think its a crateing issue
              -I don't think so. The column on the "normal" version already unbolts, so nothing is saved.

              I agree with the others, it'll magnify gib slop for the column. So the only thing I can think of is the column can slide on the dovetail, but is clamped in normal use, and the mill has a conventional X/Y table. That way the "throat" of the machine can be varied, to accomodate larger workpieces.

              The Z-to-column spacing won't change, of course, but the column-to-table can, and while not as handy as the ram on a Bridgeport, I can see how that'd be useful.

              Doc.
              Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

              Comment


              • #8
                This is being sold by Axminister as a "Sieg Super X2", although Sieg Industries has claimed it is not on their product line.

                http://www.axminster.co.uk/product-A...ill-715053.htm

                Comment


                • #9
                  That's the bugger.
                  So it was obviously commissioned by Axeminster.

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                  Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Only difference is that Axminster call it an X2 not an X3 it is even more expensive than an X3 by about a third!!
                    Peter
                    I have tools I don't know how to use!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Peter, probably my mistake as I called it a SX3 in the first post which is what I thought it was derived from.

                      And the X3 is going to be coming down in price, Arc have just had a delivery of two containers of X3's and they are going to be doing an offer on the X3 just as they did with the C3 at Christmas.

                      .
                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                      Comment


                      • #12
                        John,
                        If they keep dropping the prices I may as well dump my X1 and go for an X3
                        Peter
                        I have tools I don't know how to use!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It has most of features of the Sieg Super X3 mill, like tapping mode, head tilt (only 30°) and a DRO and fine feed on Z-axis.

                          Only advantage to the user, as I see it, is the increased speed range of 50-2500rpm (SX3=100-1750).

                          But on the other hand the Axminster has shorter X-travel, and a less powerful motor.


                          .
                          Thomas

                          Problems worthy of attack prove their worth by hitting back
                          - Piet Hein

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Not wanting to push anything but now is the time to get anything like this as there are quite big price rises in the future for the Chinese goods.

                            The cost of raw material that was forced on us by the Chinese buying everything up has now caught up with them and last year was the last years that subsidies were paid to manufacturers.

                            Ketan from Arc is over in China at the moment and one of the things he's dealing with is the price rises as he's not happy at the increase.

                            I did post a few months ago in a post on the UK group with the subject line we have never had it so good.

                            Ill put a copy in a fresh thread.
                            .

                            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Thomas Staubo
                              It has most of features of the Sieg Super X3 mill, like tapping mode
                              From all reports, this is a negative feature... the spindle is too fast to tap with, and the reverse buttons on the spindle control handles are not reliable, causing the machine to stop running.

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