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borg warner hydraulic pump

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  • borg warner hydraulic pump

    I have a borg warner pump
    I was wondering if anyone could help me determain how many gpm it is
    I think that it is in the serial # just not sure where

    Serial # S15S7DH71R

    any help would be greatly appretiated

  • #2
    Wait till someone tells this guy, and you will have your answer.

    http://www.ytmag.com/cgi-bin/viewit....oard&th=649423

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    • #3
      lol same person I didn't get any results there so I thought i'd try here
      Last edited by CALCAFUOCO; 02-25-2008, 05:36 PM.

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      • #4
        Perhaps a Hydraulic forum would help, or even Borg Warner.

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        • #5
          borg warner didn't help any but i will try a hydraulic forum

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          • #6
            First you need to measure the pump's displacement per revolution.


            Find a graduated measuring device,say a lab beaker or good measuring cup graduated in oz.

            Turn the pump inlet port up vertical and pour the port full of fluid.Rotate the pump shaft one revolution and catch the fluid that comes out in the measuring cup.If one rotation isn't enough,then keep adding fluid and turning the shaft until you count out ten revolutions.

            This is done to determine the pumps displacement per revolution.If you get enough fluid on one revolution then it's displacement per revolution x rpm=GPM.

            If you needed 10 revs to measure then it's,total measured amount divided by 10=displacement per revolution x rpm=GPM.

            The same method can be used to determine the GPM required to run a hydraulic motor of unknown volume,but in that example you look through the other end of the glass. GPM divided by displacement per revolution= RPM.

            Your not done yet though,pumps are never 100% efficent,85%-90% is the best commonly availible pumps can do.Add to this the percent efficency varys with system pressure.The higher the pressure,the lower the efficency.85% is a safe enough number to work with assuming it's a fairly modern pump in good working order.

            So,to that end take whatever GPM you come up with and multiply that by .85

            Your next question will be what is the max rpm?Well that's a broad subject,but most pumps are built to handle either 1800 or 3600 rpm since many pumps end up coupled directly to electric motors.

            Hp required to run said pump?It gets a little wobbly here since pump /motor efficency come into play again,but this page explains why it will be difficult to nail down that number for a mystery pump.

            http://www.gpmhydraulic.com/tipapr.htm

            Hope this helps.
            Last edited by wierdscience; 02-25-2008, 11:09 PM.
            I just need one more tool,just one!

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