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my first true mig welds

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  • my first true mig welds

    Yesterday i finally stopped by my local gas distributor and picked up a tank of C25. I have been using flux core wire since i picked up my welder (black Friday impulse buy ).

    One thing is for sure I'm never going back to flux core unless i need to weld outside.

    the following are my newbie (less than 6 hours of stick time) attempts at MIG welding.

    My beads still aren't the most consistent.



    A perpendicular cut through the bead to check penetration.



    This butt joint was 1/8" bar no bevel or gap (my welder is only 110v), i still have an issue with little pin sized gaps.




    Is there a simple formula to calculate bevel and gap, for a given ipm/amps?
    -Dan S.
    dans-hobbies.com

  • #2
    Looks good, check out here...

    MIG, Arc, and TIG welding tutorials with videos for beginner and intermediate welders. Also a welding and fabrication forum.


    lots of help and calculators there.

    Dave
    If it does'nt fit, hit it.
    https://ddmetalproducts.co.uk
    http://www.davekearley.co.uk

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by dan s
      One thing is for sure I'm never going back to flux core unless i need to weld outside.
      I was told I'd never go back to fluxcore after trying gas and they were right. Someone here told me that. I guess the fluxcore still works outside in gale-force winds I never weld outside.
      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
      Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

      It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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      • #4
        Your weld...not bad. Try to steady it up so you avoid the "sawteeth" on the edges.
        Destructive (bending) testing would show a fracture along that area.
        With a light welder...don't walk it from side to side (weave)as much...that'll avoid the saw teeth issue.
        The "T" joint...in the position shown is a horizontal weld. Don't weave in this position.
        Run nice straight beads. You want a wider fillet...do multi pass welds..
        If you want a 100% weld your bevel must come to a point. You will also want good preheat...especially for a light machine.
        "Rule of Thumb... Fillet size (for that "T" joint) should equal half of the base metal thickness.
        If you want I could post some pics of a heavy multi pass weld on a T joint.
        Keep at it!
        Russ
        I have tools I don't even know I own...

        Comment


        • #5
          Torker,

          The pics would be interesting to see...

          Do any texts exist that cover the different set-ups?

          All the books i have checked out of the local library (and university) are either child simplistic, or studies on ways of minimizing costs in a production environment.

          I haven't been able to find anything that talks about bevel, root gap size, bead laying etc, in any kind of systematic way.

          these two videos are pretty interesting.
          Transition of arc weld from short circuit to spray mode of transfer (clip from ESAB).WPSAmerica.com

          Transition of arc weld from globular to spray mode of transfer (clip from ESAB). WPSAmerica.com
          -Dan S.
          dans-hobbies.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Good stuff

            Originally posted by dan s
            Torker,

            The pics would be interesting to see...

            Do any texts exist that cover the different set-ups?

            All the books i have checked out of the local library (and university) are either child simplistic, or studies on ways of minimizing costs in a production environment.

            I haven't been able to find anything that talks about bevel, root gap size, bead laying etc, in any kind of systematic way.

            these two videos are pretty interesting.
            Transition of arc weld from short circuit to spray mode of transfer (clip from ESAB).WPSAmerica.com

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HL2H79cgDuo
            Thanks Dan.

            That's good work that would do for most folks.

            To see it better, sand/grind/polish some of those faces in your pics and acid-etch them (almost any "acid" will do) and you will see the changes in colour and boundaries that will tell you how it went. The "miss" or "inclusions" at the roots will do for most jobs.

            Torker is pretty well the subject matter expert here and really knows his stuff and really goes out of his way to help - which he is very good at.

            A lot of reading, a lot of practice, more reading, more practice etc.

            Anyway, some of these links should help.

            Photo courtesy of AlcoTec Wire Corp.Motorcycle- and hot rod-building shows on TV have put welding in a very positive light lately. In fact, Jesse James, the






            How to mig weld. Setting up the welder, close up videos of welds being layed, and some standard techniques.

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            • #7
              Dont weave at all. Unless you have a tractor with a weaving feature. Most people can not do it with enough repeatably to do it consistently.

              MIG, Flux Cored & TIP TIP weld process controls, tips and welding practices. As well as Manual, Robot, MIG - TIG - Flux Cored and TIP TIG welding.

              Comment


              • #8
                the right hand flank showed a bit of undercut, watch the amps, you dont realy need to weave more than the width of the weld unless your trying to plug a big gap, then that wouldent realy be a good idea. on the whole a brilliant first effort, mine looked like seagull **** splatered on a windsheild according to my instructor!
                keep at it [you can try running a chalk along the weld it does help, reflects uv etc and gives you some reference point in an otherwise dark world]
                regards
                mark

                Comment


                • #9
                  That's a gold star for your first attempt . I tend to not see the workpiece or the nozzle. I have an automatic helmet should I adjust it more so as I can see better what I am doing that's definitely my problem any advice welcome.Alistair
                  Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Weaving is entirely acceptable in most industries...in the flat, verticle and overhead positions.....never in horizontal.
                    I have tools I don't even know I own...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Alister,

                      what setting do you have your shield set at?



                      Originally posted by Alistair Hosie
                      That's a gold star for your first attempt . I tend to not see the workpiece or the nozzle. I have an automatic helmet should I adjust it more so as I can see better what I am doing that's definitely my problem any advice welcome.Alistair
                      -Dan S.
                      dans-hobbies.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        [QUOTE=dan s]

                        My beads still aren't the most consistent.



                        QUOTE]

                        That looks good to me,for a 110vac welder thats fine. I have seen my friends drive up on new Harly Davisons with welds that make that look the very best weld on the bike.

                        I know if any of you old guys are crippled up and have a tough time welding all bent over but, an old wheelchair lift with a 4' X 4' plate steel welded to it makes a dandy little welding table.

                        Welding table hight sure can help you get comfortable and weld real nice.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Alistair Hosie
                          I tend to not see the workpiece or the nozzle. I have an automatic helmet should I adjust it more so as I can see better what I am doing
                          Most auto-darkening helmets have three settings: shade on the outside, and sensitivity and delay on the inside. For MIG and TIG most people like a shade of 10. I've got the sensitivity and delay on my helmet turned down to ~ 2 out of 10, but it differs from helmet to helmet. The best way to set those is to watch someone else weld.

                          As far as weaving, I weave on MIG, especially to cover a wide butt joint like that. On pulsed MIG, my brief experience was that you pretty much have to weave, it's laying down so much bead...

                          But I've never been able to do the textbook orbital weave on TIG and get a satisfactory result. My instructor, who is known as one of the best TIG welders in Central Texas, taught me to do straight drag on TIG, which I find gives the most consistent bead (for me anyway).

                          Edit: here's one of mine -- 10 gage mild steel, ER70-S6:

                          Last edited by lazlo; 03-05-2008, 09:43 PM.
                          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yes sir, that's some dandy looking welds for a beginner.

                            Well Laz, I'm glad you qualified your statement that your teacher is One of the Best in Central Texas.

                            If you do your welding on a bench, you are very fortunate. In real life, you're lucky to have a rope to hang onto with one hand or a creeper to lay on.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Oh boy...here you go.. Sorry about the pics. A long hard day then the gawdamm batteries start dying on my camera. Need a corded camera.
                              Some are out of focus as the camera won't focus right with dying batteries...so shoot me!
                              BTW//Laz...lookin good! Did you know...before you make any more passes over a bead like that...you should take a real sharp little pick and scrape those silica deposits off that weld (the little glassy brown spots.) The weld could fracture because of them.
                              Here's a crappy pic of a mig weld T joint. Welder set as the gurl had it...wide open w/.030 mickey wire.


                              Here's the first pass on a T joint with the heavy machine. This is dual shield .045 T wire...27 volts/ 290 ipm. Not a good setup for 1/8" stock...lol!

                              Second pass..

                              Third pass...thing is VERY hot now!
                              I have tools I don't even know I own...

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