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NEW (to me) EMCO JUST UNLOADED!!

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  • NEW (to me) EMCO JUST UNLOADED!!

    Talk about being in the right place at the right time.....
    I was filling in for a buddy at his MC shop while he was away on vacation, and one of the machine shops in the complex was in the process of down-sizing the very same week I was there.
    Coming back from lunch on Monday I noticed a lathe on a steel cabinet siting outside. Never seen one before, but was an Emco MaximatV10. The milling arm was removed because it had some motor issues, lost the motor, but the lathe other than being dirty was not too shabby. The owner said he had just listed it on Craigslist for $500.00. I offered a little less (cash) and he bit.
    Once I got it home, the treasures abounded.
    2-4 jaw and 2 3-jaw chucks, all good quality, plus tooling up the wazoo.
    In the bottom drawer of the cabinet were two SERVO brand Bridgeport table drives, both needing work. I asked him the next day if he wanted them back and he declined. The best part is later that day I sold a BMW transmission that I got for free for the exact amount of the lathe. I could have gotten twice as much if I waited but it just seemed right.
    I guess it's time to sell the Atlas 10F.
    Any comments or suggestions where I can download owners manuals/parts mauals and where to find EMCO stuff? ANy sage comments on this lathe?
    My ears and eyes are open.
    I've Googled but haven't gotten far yet.
    It's time to get the camera going and get some shop-shots.
    Robert
    grumpy old fart
    www.wirewerkes.com

  • #2
    Hey Wirewrkr -

    I've got two friends with Emco v10's. One here in AG and the other in Pismo. I'll see what info they have. What part of the central coast do you call home?

    There's a lot of good info on the Yahoo Emco group. Here's a link:

    http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/grou...guid=260651936

    Enjoy that new lathe, Emco's are beauties.

    Glenn

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the reply Glenn, I'm up in Santa Cruz.
      Robert
      grumpy old fart
      www.wirewerkes.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Go Join that yahoo group, you will find the manual in the FILES section.

        http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/grou...guid=260651936

        There are quite a few owners in that group with lots of info for you.

        You got more arse than class to be able to jag something like that, for so little dollars, lucky bugger !

        AAahh well, looks like the 'good OLD yankee iron' just aint good enough anymore, eh.



        regards radish

        Comment


        • #5
          Let's see some pictures?
          "The men the American people admire most extravagantly are the greatest liars; the men they detest most violently are those who try to tell them the truth." H. L. Mencken

          "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed, second it is violently opposed, and third, it is accepted as self-evident."

          "When fear rules, reason and logic are ruled out."

          Comment


          • #6
            Congratulations on getting a terrific little machine, and welcome!

            I received my V10 as a "retirement present" two years ago... it had been sitting unused in the corner of the prototype shop since about 1990. I tried to buy it ten years ago and they wouldn't sell... and eventually I ended up with it for free. As my S.O. says, "the biggest, heaviest damn gold watch anyone ever got".

            First word of advice: NEVER change gears while the thing is running. There's a combination of fiber and steel gears in the head, and the fiber gears are easily damaged. And expensive. Second: Check the oil levels in the headstock and quickchange boxes before you fire it up. If it was sitting outside, you probably ought to drain and refill the boxes... might have picked up some rain or dew. There's a lot of discussion about what oils to use. My book says 10wt non-detergent motor oil (try to find THAT) for the headstock, and 140wt hypoid gear oil for the quick-change (same problem; hard to find). Some of the guys are using a Castrol hydraulic oil, I believe its 46 centistokes, but I may be wrong.

            I second (third?) the recommendations for the Yahoo group. The manuals are in the "Files" section. There's also a Super11 group, and you might want to sign up for both.

            If you read German, there's also a manual online at the Buell & Strunz site.
            http://www.buellstrunz.at/default.as...16AABCC&OP=784

            Also, have a look at http://www.chaski.org/homemachinist/index.php - it's a "membership" group, but it's free, and in the year that I've been on it, I haven't been able to trace any spam back to it. They have a "3-in-1" forum and some of the members own Maximats of various vintages.

            Parts are scarce. Emco doesn't support the V10 any more. Blue Ridge Machine Tools sells some parts, but their prices are pretty high. Ebay is another source, but again, there's a "collector" element to these things, and prices get bid to astronomical levels... I saw a complete set of L20 collets (for the headstock) with case, drawbar, and nosepiece, go for more than $700 last year. That's just plain nuts for a working tool. (I got past that by getting a 5C collet chuck - less than $300 with a cheap set of collets, and I can chuck stock up to 1-1/8".)

            Some parts can be had from www.lathes.co.uk - and the site is chock-full of information about these tools.

            Drive belts are very durable, but replacements can be got from any "power transmission" shop. There are different sizes - my V10 uses a 200x075, some use 1" - these are wider than what most shops stock, but can be ordered, and will cost less than $20.

            Gears can be gotten from Quality Transmission Components in NY - www.qtcgears.com - they may not be precisely the same, but can be adapted: For instance, there's a 45-tooth gear at the top of the leadscrew train - plastic rim and steel core. QTC had the exact gear (less the two rollpin holes) for $103, but they also had an all-nylon gear the same dimensions, with a hub, for about $20. It took me all of 15 minutes to chuck the gear on the hub, bore it out to fit the steel core, and cut it off the hub.

            BTW, don't be too quick to replace the milling head... it's a bit of a PITA to change back and forth from lathe-to-mill-to-lathe, and with some luck (which you seem to have in abundance) you should be able to find a good small mill for less than you'd pay for the FB2 head-and-column... if you have the space for it.

            In general, find yourself a handful of catalogues and compare prices before you spend money. I threw away several handsful of $10 bills before I learned that prices vary all over the map.

            Again, welcome.

            Usual disclaimer - I have no commercial or personal interest whatever in any of the vendors I've mentioned.
            Pete in NJ

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for all the responses.
              I'll address some of the comments.
              The unit and the heavy steel table were pushed outside on a dolly only for that day, it has been stored in dark corner of his shop for several years, I also was told that it was primarily used for turning plastics. I don't doubt that, seeing as how much plastic swarf I've removed from the nooks and crannies.
              I got the new table legs welded on the other night and this morning put on the rubber adjustable feet I ordered several years ago from ENco for a different project. Nice to finally put these to good use. Leveled the table this morning and fired it up (after checking the oil level in the head.
              Runs as smooth as a babies butt. I love it! I noticed that the lead screw was not turning and upon closer inspection I see that there must have been a shear pin (that obviously did it's job well) that is now sheared. I'll deal with after I dismantle the carriage for a cleaning and inspection, although it seems fine besides needing a good cleaning.
              The transmission is a sight to behold, very nicely designed, the edges of the fiber gears show signs of on the fly shifting but aren't ruined yet. I WILL be very careful of not doing that. The push button switches are a little odd, the speeds are all correct as I checked them with my trusty fifty year old Stewart Warner hand held mechanical tachometer. I guess the high speed mode is momentary, probably just for polishing, I did get quite a surprise when I let go of the high speed buttons and ended up with a 2500 rpm spinning face plate dancing its way down the floor. that explains the clamp arrangement on the back of the chucks that came with it. They are all 1.5x8 like my Atlas, but are split and have a collar clamp. Too bad as I have a 2 year old Bison on my Atlas I was hoping to use on this one.
              As far as the luck thing goes, NO WAY. This is not a common occurrence for me. Since I got laid off in October, this is one of the few wonderful things that have happened to me. When I sell the Atlas, I will take a beating on it to the tune of what I paid for this one and then some. Got in way to deep on that project, first time buying on Ebay for lathe parts, but learned alot about it. Now I SELL stuff on Ebay.
              I firmly believe that given enough time, everything eventually balances out.
              Laws of nature, physics, whatever you wanna call it.
              I am going to shoot some pics today, but will have to figure out how to use this photo-bucket deal.
              I printed Evans instructions, I will go with that.
              Thanks for the support!
              Robert
              grumpy old fart
              www.wirewerkes.com

              Comment


              • #8
                High Should Lock

                Hey Robert

                Congratulations on your find, Emco makes an awesome machine. Regarding your statement about the "high speed" setting; High speed is NOT intended to be a momentary setting, the button should lock down just like the others, bear in mind that you must start the thing up in low speed, but then the high speed button can be depressed and should lock for you. This switchgear was a bit of a problem for this model and it's younger brother the V7, you'll see them on eBay from time to time. If your high speed truly doesn't lock in place I'd inspect the switchgear, I'd bet you'll find something simple just gummed up or such, but you'll undoubtebly find that you'll be wanting to use the machine in high speed often.

                Hope this helps

                Chandler

                Comment


                • #9
                  thanks Chandler! I was hoping some one would clarify that.
                  Robert
                  grumpy old fart
                  www.wirewerkes.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by wirewrkr
                    Thanks for all the responses.
                    morning and fired it up (after checking the oil level in the head.
                    Runs as smooth as a babies butt. I love it! I noticed that the lead screw was not turning and upon closer inspection I see that there must have been a shear pin (that obviously did it's job well) that is now sheared. I'll deal with after I dismantle the carriage for a cleaning and inspection, although it seems fine besides needing a good cleaning.

                    Robert
                    Robert, I've actually Paid for those shear pins, but now I just use a piece of heavy aluminum wire or maybe a all aluminum rivet that size would fit as well. Cut either one to fit and slide the sleeve over to hold in place I ordered the turbine grade oil for the gearbox and needed gears from Blue Ridge. Always felt I paid too much for stuff I ordered from them... but I was in a hurry to see it run. YOU got a deal! Enjoy.
                    Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician - Fine Line Automation CNC 4x4 Router

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Keep Some Of Your Good Atlas Stuff.....

                      Hey Robert

                      You can safely use all your 1 ½ - 8 accessories that attach to the spindle, Emco just went a little further than most others and provided the locking collar to allow you to do reverse work. I have a V7 and I don’t know if mine is different than any other ones out there, but I learned early on that it was fussy about (of all things) how it is turned off, I have to hit the stop button cleanly which disengages any other depressed buttons. Always wait for the spindle to come to a stop if you want to change from high to low range – don’t hit the stop button, let it coast down (to what you think is a safe speed) and then hit the low speed button, that’ll put too much of a strain on the spindle often effectively slowing it too quickly. I learned this the hard way, my machine is pristine except for an ugly gouge in the rear way where my ¾” Jacobs Headstock Chuck landed spinning at about 2000 RPM.

                      I commented in my earlier post that this switchgear is sometimes problematic, it’s really more of a issue of keeping the contacts clean and such. Emco did rethink the push buttons when the built the V10P Mentor, this machine is identical to yours with the exception of a more robust and common drum type motor switch, a lot of these went to colleges and vocational schools.

                      You truly do have a great machine there, I’d like to upgrade from my smaller one for no reason other than the quick change gearbox, I always cut a lot of threads and I don’t like fooling around with the change gears, I swear if my little lathe had a gearbox on it I’d still use it more than my larger lathe which is a beautiful machine with all the bells and whistles, I just love the little Emco though. One thing I found I really appreciated with the Emco that surprised me was working with the handwheel on the leadscrew, I find it so simple to lock in the half nut and do fine feeding that I rarely use the power feed at all, with a properly ground tool it’s easy to produce very nice finishes by hand, and you can use the dial for very accurate axial positioning.

                      Enjoy your new toy!

                      Chandler

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If your switch array fails... don't lay out $150 plus for another used and marginal array - throw it. Join the yahoo V10 group.. you'll see my rewiring with two $4 toggle switches - safe and effective, and an interlock for reverse.

                        The V10 (P?) is a very nice machine... look after it and it will last forever.

                        As for using other makers 1 1/2 x 8 tpi accessories - look carefully at the emco spindle first - the thread distance to the shoulders often do not match non-emco gear and don't allow you to mate with vertical portion of the shoulder - and you need those surfaces to match. Also... really easy to damage your expensive spindle... I bought Bison backing plates for chucks - nope -won't work even machined... they are several thou oversized on the horizontal portion of the shoulder. Little Machine Shop did it right for the shoulder, but it's not deep enough to mate vertically (I machined out a portion of their threads to make it work). My craftsman 1 1/2 stuff from my wood lathe doesn't fit at all
                        Last edited by lakeside53; 04-01-2008, 01:26 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I signed up last night for the group, they emailed me and asked for more info about me as they're trying to eliminate spammers.
                          It's a pain to wait, but well worth it. Mine is not a P model.
                          I really like the idea of the plain toggles, I'll be looking for it.
                          Thanks again.
                          Robert
                          grumpy old fart
                          www.wirewerkes.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            You have a nice, well built machine.

                            This ebay seller probably has all the info you need.

                            http://members.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI...zarkwoodworker

                            No connection, just a satisfied customer.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by wirewrkr
                              I signed up last night for the group, they emailed me and asked for more info about me as they're trying to eliminate spammers.
                              It's a pain to wait, but well worth it. Mine is not a P model.
                              I really like the idea of the plain toggles, I'll be looking for it.
                              Thanks again.
                              Robert
                              PM me if you can't find the info easily. I also posted a wiring schematric that's readable -Emco's is just nonsence to try to follow.....
                              Last edited by lakeside53; 04-01-2008, 01:28 AM.

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