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Best material for 5C drawtube extension?

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  • Best material for 5C drawtube extension?

    I picked up a complete Royal 5C lever collet closer off of eBay for my 10" Sheldon. Unfortunately, I wasn't thinking, and the closer was off a 2-1/4"-8 threaded spindle machine, and mine's an L-00. So the drawtube is just under an inch too short to fit.

    I can't move the lever end further to the right, as the mechanism starts hitting the gearcase cover after only about another quarter-inch.

    So I figured I'd make an extension for the drawtube. Male 5C threads on one end, female on the other, and hollow to still allow room for both material and 5C stops and the like.

    I don't have any pipe or tubing of the correct dimensions, but I do have four short chunks of 1-1/2" round solid I can use. One is cold-rolled mild steel, one is 304 stainless, the third is 4140, and the last is a chunk of mystery metal, which is firmly magnetic, cuts much better and cleaner than mild, and produces long, unbroken spiral swarf.

    So out of those four, which would be the best choice? The part'll be a relatively thin wall, fine thread collar, and I don't plan on anything extra like having the chrome-moly heat-treated.

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

  • #2
    Definitely not the stainless, I'd use whatever machines the easiest, this isn't a part that is highly stressed.

    Its going to be important to get the ends really aligned well, to be honest I'd start with a fresh piece of tubing and make the whole tube rather than make the extension, plus you won't have to worry about it losing up either from the handwheel or vibration of the machine.

    Paul T.

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    • #3
      4130 STEEL TUBE 1-3/8X.095 2FT 10 bucks for material, 10 bucks for shipping.

      www.aircraftspruce.com

      Clutch

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      • #4
        If the 4140 is pre-hard I'd go with that for the material you have. But the idea of tubing is a definite ideal solution
        Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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        • #5
          Some Harley fork tubes are the right size.

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          • #6
            Water pipe is what I have, works good.

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            • #7
              There is no real need to go to the trouble of machining a male/female thread extension on the tube, simply cut and weld. This is a common repair to drawbar tubes when the threads eventually become worn out. After getting tired of the threaded extension unscrewing at the wrong place, you will probably end up welding it anyway.

              It does not require a great deal of accuracy, a section could be welded in the middle of the tube if the ends have a lot of features machined on them.
              Mild steel works fine, pipe is OK, seamless tubing is best. Thanks to Hardinge, the ID & OD are not real dimensions, and you will have to machine whatever you use to fit.
              Jim H.

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              • #8
                Yes Micrometer50.....I used a 80's Harley Sportster front fork tube for
                my heavy 10 South Bend.....works great...Dean
                www.neufellmachining.com

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by PaulT
                  Its going to be important to get the ends really aligned well, to be honest I'd start with a fresh piece of tubing and make the whole tube rather than make the extension
                  -The problem there is the tube is knurled and pressed into the locking collar. Not something that's impossible to duplicate, but it starts adding all that much more to the overall project.

                  Doc.
                  Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                  • #10
                    if its anything like my lathe ...
                    you cant make the tube on it ....because it wont fit through the headstock ..

                    i made mine out of stainless ...no idea what kind ...
                    it was the only tube of suitable dimensions that i had lying around ...

                    and it had to be done on a friends bigger lathe .

                    all the best.....markj

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                    • #11
                      "There is no real need to go to the trouble of machining a male/female thread extension on the tube, simply cut and weld. "

                      On my Clausing 5914 the collet tube is a pretty close fit inside the full length of the spindle, and with the welding approach on this somewhat thin tubing I'd be worried about it warping and not fitting in the spindle any more, but if its commonly done maybe you can get away with it. I'd be too chicken to try.

                      Paul T.

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                      • #12
                        If alignment is a concern, a reduced diameter spigot on either end of the fill in piece can be used to locate it in the drawtube. I think Doc is pretty good with a TIG, so warpage and excess build up should not present a problem.

                        If TIG is not available, silver solder will work just as well with little danger of damage.
                        Jim H.

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                        • #13
                          High silver content braze would work excellently as JCHannum posted.

                          I've made long screwdriver bits using 1/4" hex bits and brazing to 1/4" crs. Never had one fail driving in 5" wood screws with a 18v drill.

                          Clutch

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                          • #14
                            While I am pretty decent with a TIG, I'm not yet in the expert-class where I can be 100% assured I'd have no warpage of the resulting piece.

                            Instead, I took that chunk of "mystery metal"- almost certainly some variant of mild steel, though it turns and cuts a little better- and made myself an extension collar.



                            Fits like a glove and works perfectly.



                            Now all I have to do is find a place to mount the linkage for the closer trip mechanism. There's basically nothing available, so I'm going to have to either drill & tap the gearcase cover, or the side of the headstock, neither of which I really want to do.

                            Doc.
                            Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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