Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

cad/cam, what are you guys using?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • cad/cam, what are you guys using?

    I have been using Acad autodesk '06 for a few years now, and have gotten fairly good with it, both for 2d and 3d modeling. From reading my mach3 manual again, a cam program or post processor is highly recommended. So, what software are you guys using? Preferably affordably priced. I haven't looked at the included software with mach3, haven't had time yet. I know I saw a lot of discussion in a thread a while back, but I am not turning it up. I could have sworn it was one of Evan's threads, but I am not seeing it. If you have the link, that is fine by me too.

    Anyhow, I would like to be able to do 3d, or is it 2.5d, I am not really sure what the heck the difference is.

    Tell me what you all recommend.

    Thanks,
    Jason

  • #2
    Rhino3D for CAD, OneCNC for CAM. That latter is nice, but not cheap. I talked them into a student discount, and it still wasn't cheap. But it is a nice package.

    Cheers,

    BW
    ---------------------------------------------------

    http://www.cnccookbook.com/index.htm
    Try G-Wizard Machinist's Calculator for free:
    http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCGWizard.html

    Comment


    • #3
      acad and solidworks for cad and featurecam for cad/cam, nothing cheap though. You might try searching thru a few of Evans threads from this year, I think he is using cambam now, but not positive.

      these two links will give you a better idea of what the differance between 2.5d and 3d is

      http://www.featurecam.com/general/so...turemill2d.asp
      http://www.featurecam.com/general/so...turemill3d.asp

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks guys, I will keep researching today, I was out of time last night, and thought you all might have some good suggestions. I will look through the posted software first.

        Thanks,
        Jason

        Comment


        • #5
          I am a design engineer, and work in 3D Solidworks. It is an amazing program, and I can not say enough good things about it. if I want to export to a shop for CNC work I can export in .dwg, .dxf, or .iges formats. www.rupnowdesign.com
          Brian Rupnow
          Design engineer
          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks! I tried to learn solidworks back in the late '90s(?) I never had a lot of luck with it. I probably did not put enough effort into it, as I picked up Acad fairly easily when I had a need for it. Out of curiosity, are you saying solidworks is easier to model in over all, or just for 3d assemblies.

            Thanks,
            Jason

            Comment


            • #7
              I am using CamBam now for most of my CAM work. However the version I am using isn't publicly available as it is in beta test. For CAD I use a variety of programs from a very old copy to Turbo Cad to several of the free trial packages to plain old finger cam.
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

              Comment


              • #8
                Okay, I have been reading for about 2hrs about 2.5 vs. 3d and I am still confused. It appears that 2.5d basically means a 3d shape can be machined from several layers of different depth cuts, but cannot machine any overhangs.

                I think this will be sufficient for my machine, but I do have a 4th axis rotab that I intend to use eventually. Will 2.5d cam handle things like gears and spline machined w/ a 4th axis?

                Thanks for the answers so far. I did search back through Evans post, I thought for sure he listed all of the software he is using in one of the threads, maybe it was in a reply to someone else, and I only searched his threads. Anyhow, I can't find it, but cambam looks pretty nice. I will probably try it out.

                Thanks,
                Jason

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Evan
                  I am using CamBam now for most of my CAM work. However the version I am using isn't publicly available as it is in beta test. For CAD I use a variety of programs from a very old copy to Turbo Cad to several of the free trial packages to plain old finger cam.
                  Big surprise Evan, You always have the best and newest stuff.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    2.5D means the mill can do 3D objects but it move only 2 axis at one time a 3D machine moves any or all of the 3 axis at the same time.

                    I draw with RhinoV4 and exploring Visual Mill and MadCam for machining. Rhino costs less than Solidworks and AutoCad but it is superior for developing 3D objects for milling. If you have AutoCad experience then Rhino is real easy to pick up.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Stepside
                      2.5D means the mill can do 3D objects but it move only 2 axis at one time a 3D machine moves any or all of the 3 axis at the same time.
                      Slight correction.
                      "2.5D means the mill can do 3D objects but it move only interpolate 2 axis at one time"

                      Many controllers more than machines, can do 3D provided that the Z move is in short line moves.

                      .
                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jacampb2
                        Thanks! I tried to learn solidworks back in the late '90s(?) I never had a lot of luck with it. I probably did not put enough effort into it, as I picked up Acad fairly easily when I had a need for it. Out of curiosity, are you saying solidworks is easier to model in over all, or just for 3d assemblies.

                        Thanks,
                        Jason
                        Solidworks is easier for everything!!! First you design the parts---This is fairly simple, as you draw and dimension one face of the part, same as in 2D---then you extrude it to the proper depth to create the 3D part model. After you make all the "parts" which are saved as "part files", you drag and drop all the individual "parts" into an assembly. Solidworks provides you with tools to assemble these parts, same as you would use in real life with real parts. For instance, if 2 parts have bolt holes that are bolted together, you highlight the two circular faces and put a "concentric" mate on them---this will align the two holes. Then you decide which faces on the 2 parts would be next to one and other, and highlight the 2 faces and put a "coincident" mate on them. This moves the two faces of the parts together. then the only freedom of movement the 2 parts have is the fact that they can rotate about the centerline of the bolt hole, so you select 2 faces and either put a coincident mate on them or an angle mate to fix that third range of movement. You can assemble over 1000 peices this way on a complex machine!!! Then this file is saved as an "assembly" file. To make 2D drawings, you just drag and drop the parts or assemblies into a predefined "drawing" sheet, and it creates all the views automatically. you never have to 'draw". You create parts and assembly files, and all the "drawing" is a fully automated function. Remember---You have already defined the math data of the parts and assemblies when you created them. Its probably not quite as simple as I make it sound, ---- I use it 8 hours a day 5 days a week, and I teach courses in it as well, but it certainly is a wonderfull program.---Brian
                        Brian Rupnow
                        Design engineer
                        Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          2d / 2.5d / 3d

                          I just bought one of these router tables and read this it helped me understand the difference about 2D / 2.5D / 3D.

                          I am in the process of putting it together now I should be giving it a test run in the next day or two.

                          http://www.shopbottools.com/3-d_work_v2.htm

                          Mike

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Stepside
                            2.5D means the mill can do 3D objects but it move only 2 axis at one time a 3D machine moves any or all of the 3 axis at the same time.

                            .................

                            Actually, if you do a little research you'll find those terms have no specific meaning beyond what the writer wants them to mean.

                            I originally learned 2.5D meant it would move all three axes simultaneously, but only as a linear move. 3D was a machine that would do out-of-plain arcs using ail three axes simultaneously.

                            Both of my mills will do my definition of 2.5D. One will also do limited 3D using axis rotation for an out-of-plain arc, but not fully 3D since the arc must be in a plain rotated around the X,Y or Z axis.

                            I have since learned my ideas of these terms do not match those of others.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              DR is correct in what he's written.
                              Full 3D is able to move in three simultaneous arcs and is a feature of the controller more than software and the machine.

                              True 3D controllers are rare and expensive.

                              Most controllers can't and fudge it by stepping one axis to get the 3D move.

                              It is also possible to interpolate an arc using other than XY.
                              There are 3 standard G codes for this in most controllers G17, G18 and G19

                              G17 is the usual XY arc like a circle cut in the flat.

                              G18 is an arc in XZ, imagine a pendulum swinging from Z along the X side to side axis

                              G19 is an arc in YZ, again a pendulum singing from Z in the Y plane
                              .

                              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X