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CNC: Tubular bells with no tubes

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  • CNC: Tubular bells with no tubes

    Here is a simple g-code program to make a small set of wind chimes that sound bigger than they are. They have the sound of tubular bells but are cut from flat. I made a set last night but neglected to take a picture then and it's too early to do it now. The reason they sound like tubes is that the chimes are tuning forks.

    There are several tool changes. The chimes are cut with a 3.125 mm cutter (1/8"). The holes are drilled with a 1.6 mm drill (1/16") and your favorite engraving bit that cuts 0.1 mm deep is required for the text. Or, you can edit the text from the g-code and skip that part.

    The parts are all retained by tabs and the material is 1.5 to 2 mm (.063") aluminum. The harder the alloy the better the chimes sound. Cuts are all made in 1 pass at 100 mm per min. Material required is 9 cm x 19 cm. The code includes a section to cut the entire job from a larger sheet, also with tabs.

    The chimes are quite pleasant as I made them to the correct length to resonate in the key of D major. I used the spread sheet supplied by William Cogger which saved me the trouble of calculating the chime lengths myself.



    http://vts.bc.ca/misc/wind_chime_kit_9x19.txt

    Last edited by Evan; 04-28-2008, 10:04 AM.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

  • #2
    Evan

    Are these "tuned" and if so will different alloys require different sizes?

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    • #3
      They are tuned for aluminum but all alloys of a particular metal have the same modulus of elasticity so it doesn't matter what alloy. These are quite high in pitch and human pitch sensitivity isn't very precise at such frequencies. They do sound quite nice and if you are close they ring for quite a while, maybe 10 to 15 seconds.
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #4
        As someone who understands that " D major" is military speak for someone or something, could you capture the actual sound for those of us who are working on acquiring culture?

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        • #5
          Neat. I notice the CAM diagram shows "Wind Chime Kit" -- are you planning on selling these?
          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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          • #6
            D major of D 7th?
            Just got my head together
            now my body's falling apart

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            • #7
              Robert,

              I'm working up a library of assorted trinkets to sell/trade at the local farmers market during the summer. It's very popular and people bring some very interesting things to that weekly event. It's a nice way to spend a day when the weather is good. It isn't a flea market as people aren't selling used junk. One time there was a fellow there selling rough sawn planks of cedar and spruce as long as 12 feet and as large as 14" x 6" and all perfectly clear without a single knot, check or blemish.
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #8
                I mis-wrote, it's actually a chord in G major, the notes D, G, A and B in the 9th octave.
                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                • #9
                  is that an add9?
                  I'm no keyboard player.
                  Just got my head together
                  now my body's falling apart

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                  • #10
                    That is the octave above the top octave on a piano. However, the chimes have overtones (undertones?) that are sub multiples of the fundamental and extend down several octaves.
                    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                    • #11
                      Don't mean frequency Evan, I meant the chord

                      "chord in G major, the notes D, G, A and B "
                      Just got my head together
                      now my body's falling apart

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                      • #12
                        `CNC: Tubular Bells with no tubes

                        Evan:

                        Would you be willing to share a DXF or IGS of the drawing? Looks like a good project for our students and, since we are a continent away, there will be no concern about competition.

                        Errol Groff
                        Errol Groff

                        New England Model Engineering Society
                        http://neme-s.org/

                        YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/GroffErrol?feature=mhee

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                        • #13
                          I'll see if I can generate one from CamBam. I did the design entirely in the CAM program.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Evan
                            I'm working up a library of assorted trinkets to sell/trade at the local farmers market during the summer.
                            Neat idea Evan! If I remember correctly, you're ultimately planning to make telescope enhancements, right?
                            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Evan
                              I mis-wrote, it's actually a chord in G major, the notes D, G, A and B in the 9th octave.
                              Can you code a set up in Morris Minor ?

                              .
                              .

                              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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