Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Eat up with the dumb a$$

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Eat up with the dumb a$$

    Once again, I've proven that I am my own worst enemy. While making a simple tool, and while performing a simple milling operation, I noticed during my set-up on the mill that everything was not as it should have been...but...fear not...and blindly forge ahead anyway. Then several hours later, and after having to perform two additional milling operations by way of compensating for the mistake in the initial set-up, and after having exhausted lots of free time, and ALL of my entensive vocabulary, I have finally arrived at where I should have been after about 1 hour of work.
    Looking at this project, nobody will ever know, but I will always know...and never forget how not correcting this simple condition caused me so much grief. Well, I say I'll never forget, and vow never to do anything so stupid again, but the reality is that I probably will do something similar again. I'd like to think that I'm smart enough to benefit from all of my mistakes, but as I get older, I seem to make similar mistakes over and over again. Maybe it's getting time to q..qu...qui.......I can't bear to say it!
    This little exercise has given me a new understanding of the phrase:"You can pay me now, or you can pay me later".
    Last edited by Ed Tipton; 05-02-2008, 07:02 AM.
    There is no shortage of experts, the trick is knowing which one to listen to!

  • #2
    So are you bragging or complaining?

    Comment


    • #3
      I like my drugs better.
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

      Comment


      • #4
        I like to think of these as learning experiences.....
        Something like "Our knowledge is the the accumulation of our mistakes"
        Believe me, we all do it and it is usually the learning experience the we remember the longest.
        Don't beat yourself up, heck, add it to your resume as training.
        "Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not."~ Thomas Jefferson

        Comment


        • #5
          What's to brag about? I am just acknowledging that I sometimes make stupid, and costly mistakes. I know that I'm not the only one who does this, but that knowledge doesn't make it a less bitter experience. It's just another one of life's little lessons. I caught the error, but instead of acknowledging the significance of it, I opted to ignore it and forge ahead in spite of it...which in the end cost me much more time and frustration than simply taking a few additional minutes to correct the situation. I am sure that everyone who reads this forum has made similar mistakes...this is just my little story. Enjoy!
          There is no shortage of experts, the trick is knowing which one to listen to!

          Comment


          • #6
            OK. To be serious, how many times have "you" (everyone in the room) gone ahead and done something where you know full well that the setup is a bit shaky, you really should put the other vise on or change the tool or whatever? Then it doesn't turn out right and you end up doing what it was that you tried to avoid.

            Yeah, me too.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

            Comment


            • #7
              Me three.

              Last time a shaky setup was ignored by me, I was walking into harbor freight!

              Comment


              • #8
                It's all part of the game. I have a lot of distractions here with this operation and find it's very easy to screw up from time to time.
                As you know, I have an apprentice working with me. It's ambarrassing when you make a big screwup right in front of God and.. well the apprentice.
                The ones that catch me the most often are distortion control on complicated weldments. I'm actually very good at that... normally. Get in a big hurry to get the job done.. customers running all over the yard...phone ringing off the hook, etc, etc... forget to put on a couple of temp braces... weldment curls up like a piece of bacon!!!!
                I hate that! Had one.. the golfball escalator... took two days to get the warpage out of it. A very complicated structure that bit me in the butt.
                Ya.. don't feel bad we all do it
                Russ
                I have tools I don't even know I own...

                Comment


                • #9
                  a hand up here...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Ed,
                    I do the same thing, see a problem, rather then stop and re-think the entire process, I just "forge on" as you say, more often then not it just seems to go further down hill.

                    Lesson learned ? ...................... Probably not

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Same here... "Lazy Man's Load Syndrome"...
                      Pete in NJ

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hey, everything in life is a gamble.
                        Our educational/vocational choices. Our choice of a mate. Sometimes it works out right, sometimes not.
                        Sometimes, as in Ed's case here, the shortcut turns out to be a "longcut", and over those we knash our teeth in anguish. It would help to take consolation in all those other times when the shortcut actually paid off. But of course at the moment they've paled into insignificance.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lynnl
                          It would help to take consolation in all those other times when the shortcut actually paid off. But of course at the moment they've paled into insignificance.

                          There ya go, Damn Ed --- dont beat yourself up for getting the job done in a different way, maybe this way can be applied to something else down the road?
                          Keep in mind that any monkey who knows how to read can do just about anything If he has someone to tell him "how" -- but who wants to go through life as a drone?
                          I actually think a congrats is in order
                          Iv had labor rate books quote me 11 hours and gotten the job done in 1,
                          I dont take anybodys word on how to do something, except my own, track record has proven that for every time I get "caught" and have to pay the fiddler there's at least a dozen times that Iv been skating for free, But you have to get "caught" once in awhile to know what you can get away with, Its the perfect teacher -
                          Not to mention the invaluable lessons of confidence and free thinking that iv picked up along the way, Most times when I get caught now It will actually make me smile (unless im pressed for time )
                          As with cars - im to the point where I can see most of the engineering flaws and also pick out to where they seem to want to throw a wrench in the service end of it all --- sometimes drilling one little access hole in a piece of non-structural plastic and then installing a rubber plug can save you a couple of hours, Fuqe by the book, Keep in mind most books are only as smart as the people who wrote them, and my experience is most people who write books are like most others - there's generally a "drone" mentality... If its complex and something iv never done before I'll skim through a service book and start eliminating most of the procedures while adding a few of my own, I dont care what you do -- there's more than one way to skin any catfish.
                          As long as you follow good safety practice were not mice getting caught in a trap and getting our necks broke --- we get a second and third and fourth and on and on chance, You just took a good step in perfecting your game.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I don't do that very often BUT on the other hand I spend 10 x the
                            work time on "thinking" about how to do it so I'm VERY inefficient. :-)
                            Thank goodness I'm retired and dont depend on the machining to
                            suport me. :-)
                            ...lew...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hell I make mistakes, But I sure don't post them.

                              Nor do I walk around with a sign on my back that says Kick me.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X