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What do design engineers do in their spare time???

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  • What do design engineers do in their spare time???

    They build other mechanical gadgets!!! I wanted a little project for my new lathe, and something to amuse my grand daughter. I have a small spring fed stream in my back yard, and I have always been interested in waterwheels, so---I found a bronze bushing, an aluminum plate, and a 3/4" stainless steel bolt in my junk bin. I bought 10 foot of 1/4" aluminum round rod, and went to the dollar store and bought 8 cheap stainless steel soup ladles. Voila!!!--A waterwheel is born. It turns slowly, because the stream is running on a very gentle slope, but it does run consistently.---Brian
    http://
    Brian Rupnow

  • #2
    And there was me thinking they trawled the orthopedic wards for strangely shaped people who would be able to get to the fasteners on their designs once they had been robot assembled, left the factory & needed repairing,

    Nick

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    • #3
      Couldn't you hook a 50 megawatt generator to that and solve the Global Warming issue?

      Doug

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      • #4
        I've seen such things powering a small piston pump to slowly but steadily fill a rain barrel, or a small pond higher up the hill.
        Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
        ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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        • #5
          Wes1:

          "I've seen such things powering a small piston pump to slowly but steadily fill a rain barrel, or a small pond higher up the hill."

          Not to hijack but have you ever seen a hydraulic ram?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by NickH
            And there was me thinking they trawled the orthopedic wards for strangely shaped people who would be able to get to the fasteners on their designs once they had been robot assembled, left the factory & needed repairing,

            Nick
            i'm looking for a badly mutated oil filter monkey with a third alternater arm also!
            tis not many design engineers that admit to a, being one and b, having spare time.
            mark
            Last edited by boslab; 05-03-2008, 10:28 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Wes1
              I've seen such things powering a small piston pump to slowly but steadily fill a rain barrel, or a small pond higher up the hill.
              Or a small container at each bucket, lifting a little water in each to the top, and dumping into a trough....... amazing what going 24/7 does.

              Depends if you own the spring.......
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Forrest Addy
                Wes1:

                "I've seen such things powering a small piston pump to slowly but steadily fill a rain barrel, or a small pond higher up the hill."

                Not to hijack but have you ever seen a hydraulic ram?
                Yep, had one for a while, found in a junkyard. Never did anything with it as the creek through my place didn't have enough fall.
                Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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                • #9
                  ...have you ever seen a hydraulic ram?

                  I have never seen one, but my father said they had one in the creek on the farm in Canada where he was born. I always wondered how much flow they needed to pump. I tried google-ing hydraulic ram, and found http://www.greenandcarter.com/

                  --Doozer
                  Last edited by Doozer; 05-04-2008, 09:11 AM.
                  DZER

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                  • #10
                    I saw several in operation in Kenya in the early 80's and one dealer in Kisumu had Blakes rams from England for sale. The Rife Ram Co in New Jersy was the US supplier. I have a "do it your self" maual on designing and building rams for "third world" applications. They are not very efficient but the up-side is that they use no power, require almost no maitenance and never rest. Maximum efficiency is about 20%, but the lift ratio is as high as 20 to 1. So if you have a flow of say 10 gpm and a fall or head of 25 feet, you could deliver 1 gpm to a height of 150 feet. Not to shabby for free!
                    Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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                    • #11
                      If you have access to old Model Engineer magazines from the 80's or early 90's (I don't know exactly when) they had some articles on hydraulic rams including one on how to make them out of common hardware store parts.
                      The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                      Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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                      • #12
                        I seen a hydraulic ram operating in Kilaloe, Ontario. There was an old farmhouse located on a hilltop, and an artesian well about half way down the hill. The owner had installed a hydraulic ram in the artesian well that had a 4" diameter piston in it. This 4" piston was slaved to a 3/4" piston on a common shuttle mechanism. The power of the water coming from the artesian well would move the 4" piston through its cycle, and the 3/4" piston would pump water under much higher pressure through piping, up the hill to a holding reservoir at the farmhouse. This holding reservoir had an overflow, so that there was always a trickle of water flowing back down the hill to the artesian well spillway. Even on the hottest summers day, there was ice cold drinking water in that farmhouse. I believe that that ram was made in Finland .
                        Brian Rupnow

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Duffy
                          I saw several in operation in Kenya in the early 80's and one dealer in Kisumu had Blakes rams from England for sale. The Rife Ram Co in New Jersy was the US supplier. I have a "do it your self" maual on designing and building rams for "third world" applications. They are not very efficient but the up-side is that they use no power, require almost no maitenance and never rest. Maximum efficiency is about 20%, but the lift ratio is as high as 20 to 1. So if you have a flow of say 10 gpm and a fall or head of 25 feet, you could deliver 1 gpm to a height of 150 feet. Not to shabby for free!
                          any way for you to make a copy of this manual? i'd be interested. we have a small stream on our property and i need to get water to a small garden about 150 yards away and up a 50' hill. an older neighbor of mine always tells me about the hydraulic ram they had at the farmhouse when he was a kid, and i think it would be the perfect solution to my problem.

                          andy b.
                          The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

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                          • #14
                            For those who are curious, the operation is explained here:

                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydraulic_ram
                            Paul A.

                            Make it fit.
                            You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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