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120 hours hammering

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  • 120 hours hammering

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDE25KaXVJk

  • #2
    The part where we merge science and art and build musical instruments is one of the highest specialized levels we can take the machinist art.

    I Wish I could make a drum like that. I respect the artist and craftsman that make that unit. They are a testament to the nit picker perfectionist that most machinist embody.

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    • #3
      Neat video,aways amazing what people can come up with.120 hrs for a pro!Imagine how long it would take a beginner.
      I just need one more tool,just one!

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      • #4
        `When I was living in SF, there were quite a few street musicians who used the steel drums, they have a sound all their own.

        Most were built as shown in the vid, Some that I looked at had various thicknesses of steel welded together for the different notes. Some had like a rosette or snowflake pattern in them, each petal providing a different note, others just had different semi-circular pads welded into the base and built up of different thicknesses of metal.

        Always wondered how they managed to 'isolate' each note, since each panel is connected to the adjecent ones.

        ken.

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        • #5
          There was a segment on the Discovery channel show "How It's Made" that focused on making those steel drums. One part of it showed the guy "tuning" the notes by heating that particular area of the steel drum head to some color (yellow/reddish ?) and doing some sort of hammering on it till it sounded right to him.

          Check it out if you happen to run across that episode.

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          • #6
            I remember reading somewhere that you don't need to spend thousands on an expensive piano or millions on a stradivarious violin. they say modern carbon fibre violins can with the correct electronic package be tuned to the same exact frequencies.It's the same with pianos the japanese developed this techique for pianos for moder electronis instruments and the sound or can be made to sound exactly like the real thing.Alistair
            Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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