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South Bend 13x40 Power Feed Problem

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  • South Bend 13x40 Power Feed Problem

    Hello,

    I think I should have painted my South Bend red with orange and yellow flames as I am starting to think that this machine has been sent to me from hades.

    Anyhow, here is the next problem:

    The longitudal and cross feeds work fine when the lathe is in back gear. But, when I run it without the back gear, the flat belt slips. I figure that the back gear gives it enough torque to overcome any problems. I think the spindle is loose enough as it will spin about a whole turn if I spin it by hand. I have taken apart the entire gear box and apron, fixed any problems, and re-assembled them. So, I think that I either need to adjust and/or shorten the flat belt as the flat belt is adjusted about as tight as I can get it. Is there any rule as to how tight a flat belt should be. i.e. belt deflection?

    Thanks,

    Brian
    There are only 10 types of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don't.

  • #2
    Sounds like your problem isn't the belt, but that you haven't engaged the pin which fixes the spindle to the bull gear.

    EDIT - sorry, fixes the bull gear to the pulleys.
    Last edited by rantbot; 05-09-2008, 01:12 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by rantbot
      Sounds like your problem isn't the belt, but that you haven't engaged the pin which fixes the spindle to the bull gear.
      Nope. The pin is engaged. However, I have done that on a couple of occassions.
      There are only 10 types of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don't.

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      • #4
        Brian, I recently had to shorten the belt on my 13 and I now have about 1" of deflection when the belt is tight and it has yet to slip, even on a heavy cut. Another option would be to replace the leather with a serpentine belt. It has been discussed in detail on PM http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...d.php?t=128822
        I have the belt and the glue and plan on doing it but just haven't had the time to do it.

        Mac
        Mac

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rmack898
          Brian, I recently had to shorten the belt on my 13 and I now have about 1" of deflection when the belt is tight and it has yet to slip, even on a heavy cut. Another option would be to replace the leather with a serpentine belt. It has been discussed in detail on PM http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...d.php?t=128822
          I have the belt and the glue and plan on doing it but just haven't had the time to do it.

          Mac
          Thanks. I'll check for 1" of deflection tonight. I am using a leather flat belt as I had to cut the original belt in order to disassemble the machine.

          Brian
          There are only 10 types of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don't.

          Comment


          • #6
            That's probably good enough for a rule of thumb, but how much pressure should it take to get the 1" of deflection? As much pressure as you can easily put on with your hand, or are we talking putting your weight into it? Maybe it tops out and there's not much difference beyond a certain amount of pressure... just curious.

            With the feed engaged, can you still turn it by hand OK, or is there a lot more resistance compared to when the feed is not engaged?

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            • #7
              Replace your existing belt with and serpentine belt and your problem will go away! Gary P. Hansen
              In memory of Marine Engineer Paul Miller who gave his life for his country 7-19-2010 Helmand Province, Afghanistan. Freedom is not free, it is paid for with blood.

              Comment


              • #8
                Update!

                Saturday, I shortened the leather flat belt by 1" and the lathe now works great!

                (Well, except for a bell-mouthed non-removeable chuck, bent taper attachment clamping bar, zero-resetable handwheels that can't be set, gib problems, lousy backlash (several turns) on the compound, missing pedestal door lock, broken tailstock handwheel, and probably a few other things I need to fix yet.)


                I would consider the serpentine belt, however, I this leather flat belt is brand new as I just bought it recently and would like to get some use out of it.

                Thanks,

                Brian
                There are only 10 types of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don't.

                Comment


                • #9
                  " I would consider the serpentine belt, however, I this leather flat belt is brand new as I just bought it recently and would like to get some use out of it."


                  I know how you feel. I bought rubberized "end less" belts for one of my lathes a few years ago before I Evan replaced his belts with serpentine belts and paid $80. for them. They were glued together on the lathe (far better than alagater clips) The rubberized belts are about twice as good as leather However, I would say serpentine belts are about 10 times better. I still can not bring my self to cut off those $80 belts. I do have a serpentine on one lathe and it just does not slip. Gary P. Hansen
                  In memory of Marine Engineer Paul Miller who gave his life for his country 7-19-2010 Helmand Province, Afghanistan. Freedom is not free, it is paid for with blood.

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