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Bandsaw Blade for Aluminum

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  • gellfex
    replied
    Originally posted by ETG
    Bought a 10" 40 tooth carbide tipped blade for my miter saw and it went through the 1/2"x3" 6061 like butter - Thanks all.
    Ed
    Easier than you thought it would be, huh? Now just don't use that blade for wood. It's amazing how much more wood will dull a blade than AL or brass. I can tell the difference immediately on the 14" bandsaw. A model shop I worked in had 14's marked for wood and metal, and it had nothing to do with differences in the speed or blades.

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  • ETG
    replied
    Bought a 10" 40 tooth carbide tipped blade for my miter saw and it went through the 1/2"x3" 6061 like butter - Thanks all.
    Ed

    Leave a comment:


  • HTRN
    replied
    Originally posted by clutch
    The Amada vbs at work has rotating brushes to clean the band.
    Marvel saws do as well. I think it's a fairly standard feature on most of the larger horizontal bandsaws.


    HTRN

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  • Duffy
    replied
    I cut cast and 6061 using a 10" 26 tooth rip blade on my table saw and a 12" 40 tooth general purpose blade in my chop saw. No lubricant, REALLY noisy, and a pretty smooth surface. I use a 6 tooth 1/4" or 3/8" blade in my 14" band saw at maximum speed and no lubricant for aluminum, brass and gun metal. The blade still cuts wood just fine, by the way.

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  • ETG
    replied
    If I try a carbide tipped blade in my 10" miter saw, what tooth count should I try to get. Any specific blade type???
    Thanks,
    Ed

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  • gellfex
    replied
    Originally posted by Mad Scientist
    I have used a triple chip blade in a table saw to cut aluminum and lead. Works reasonably well with no lubricant.

    However eye and ear protection are an absolute must.
    I have not noticed a significant difference between triple chips and alternating bevels. Triple chips were what we used in the factory though.

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  • gellfex
    replied
    Originally posted by ETG
    Thanks,
    I had been cutting it on a 10" miter saw with an abrasive cutoff wheel. I tried an 80 tooth plywood blade but it galled up so bad I ended up having to mill the sides. For what I'm making the sides don't really matter but I don't want them to look like it was hacked off with an axe. Having to mill the sides adds too much time to the piece. I haven't tried a carbide tipped blade and wax. I was thinking the more teeth the better and smoother the cut would be. I'm a newbie self teaching myself on the lathe and mill so please forgive my ignorance.
    Thanks,
    Ed
    I find that on the 4x6 saw a thick cut wanders so much out of square that I always have to either mill or grind it afterwards. For the radial saw, carbide definitely helps. For me time is also an issue, and a 4x6 is a dreadfully slow way to cut AL. Abrasive wheel is a pretty bad way to do AL, they clog and it's just unnecessary, with so many easier ways.

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  • lugnut
    replied
    I've had two of the little HF 4X6 band saws and really like them. For the money you can't beat them. I cut a good amount of aluminum with mine and just use a little WD-40 squirted on the cut every once in a while. I don't want to have to mess with the mess of a coolant system. I usually replace the blade once a year. Never have broken one. I also just use the same blade I use for steel I think it's a Matrix II Bi-Metal 10/14 tpi vari-tooth. Hell l cut a bunch of aluminum on my wood cutting band saw.
    Mel
    Last edited by lugnut; 05-12-2008, 06:06 PM.

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  • Mad Scientist
    replied
    I have used a triple chip blade in a table saw to cut aluminum and lead. Works reasonably well with no lubricant.

    However eye and ear protection are an absolute must.

    Leave a comment:


  • ETG
    replied
    Thanks,
    I had been cutting it on a 10" miter saw with an abrasive cutoff wheel. I tried an 80 tooth plywood blade but it galled up so bad I ended up having to mill the sides. For what I'm making the sides don't really matter but I don't want them to look like it was hacked off with an axe. Having to mill the sides adds too much time to the piece. I haven't tried a carbide tipped blade and wax. I was thinking the more teeth the better and smoother the cut would be. I'm a newbie self teaching myself on the lathe and mill so please forgive my ignorance.
    Thanks,
    Ed

    Leave a comment:


  • Scishopguy
    replied
    Bandsaws

    Originally posted by clutch
    The Amada vbs at work has rotating brushes to clean the band.

    Clutch
    That sounds pretty neat. The Kalamazoo brushes would wear on the side that was toward the teeth and you would have to turn them over eventually. I ordered half a dozen sets from the manufacturer and they lasted for years but the rotating type would wear evenly. I didn't know that they had anything like that.

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  • gellfex
    replied
    Hmm. I cut lots of AL and that saw ( I have a similar one) would be the last thing I turn to. I have a 6 tpi skip tooth raker blade in my 14" bandsaw that I often cut AL up to 1" on. I also will cut thick AL in my 12" miter saw with an 80 tooth carbide wood blade, A clamping setup and little cutting wax helps, but I've cut 3" dia with that.

    I learned my disrespect for AL from my old timer boss in a lighting factory 28 years ago. One job of mine was cutting hundreds of 1/4" thick AL disks on the 14" bandsaw. The craziest job I did there was use a router mounted horizontally on a table with a jig to route an inside shoulder in the end of cast AL elbows from 6" to 12" dia. When a bit would snap off it scared the crap out of me.

    My boss was a piece of work. His hobby was building full scale flying early biplane reproductions.

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  • clutch
    replied
    Originally posted by Scishopguy
    Kalamazoo saws came with a set of stiff bristle wire brushes on either side of the roller guides to remove chips that clung to the teeth.
    The Amada vbs at work has rotating brushes to clean the band.

    Clutch

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  • Scishopguy
    replied
    Dave nailed it

    I agree. I also agree that the compressed air will help greatly if you don't want the mess of a coolant or mist generator. It does two things, blows the swarf from the teeth, and draws some of the heat out of the material.

    Kalamazoo saws came with a set of stiff bristle wire brushes on either side of the roller guides to remove chips that clung to the teeth. Some felt that they prematurely dulled the teeth but that is debateable.

    Let us know how you like the HF saw.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mad Scientist
    replied
    Again ditto what Dave said.
    Definitely use a name brand blade, the import blades are junk and don’t hold an edge.
    This is not a production machine so do not expect lighting fast cuts, BUT it will make decent cuts.

    I have a recurring job that also requires cutting 3 x ½” 6061 aluminum. I use a 6 tooth blade and occasionally squirt on some cutting fluid.

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