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  • #31
    My wonderful wife pointed out a copy to me at a flea market for a mere $2.00. That is, by far the best machining-related score I've ever found. It's an older edition, but still, great deal.
    Stuart de Haro

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    • #32
      Originally posted by hornluv
      It's an older edition, but still, great deal.
      I think there was only one edition of Machine Tool Reconditioning. There have been reprints, but I think the text is the same.
      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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      • #33
        Originally posted by lazlo
        I think there was only one edition of Machine Tool Reconditioning. There have been reprints, but I think the text is the same.
        Well then, two bucks is sounding better all the time!
        Stuart de Haro

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        • #34
          Originally posted by hornluv
          My wonderful wife pointed out a copy to me at a flea market for a mere $2.00.
          Just goes to show that some people have no idea what they have.

          As others here mentioned a used book will fetch almost as much as a new one.

          I aquired a copy a few years ago at what I thought was a deal at $2.00, well I had to give the seller $2.00 twenty five times.
          Last edited by ERBenoit; 05-16-2008, 10:29 AM.
          Paying Attention Is Not That Expensive.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by lazlo
            Funny you should mention that Charles -- when I contacted Mike last Summer about buying his scraping video and book, he replied that "Contrary to popular belief, the Bridgeport book is almost done."

            I didn't even mention the Bridgeport rebuilding book, so I gather that's a sore point for him

            Fair to say that I bought my copy of Morgan's scraping book a year or so ago. I just filled in the online form, paid by card and it arrived in the UK about 10 days later. Personally I'm in no doubt that he'll do it - I'm just impatient. I'd also like a Biax scraper but that'll have to wait aswell!

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            • #36
              Gee Robert...I almost feel "wierded out" at the thought of being included with guys like McGyver or Stephen Thomas. I am really a rank amateur and I think the only scraping work I have shown here has been my straightedge. I feel even more amateurish as Forrest is absolutely right...Scraping, as a trade, is something that one would spend many years experience mastering. If I rescrape every way surface on every machine I own, I still won't have the experience that a master scraper hand would have in just a few years as an apprentice.

              For me (and I think for most home shop types) there is a need to sort of escalate the learning curve so that you can get on with the work involved. As Forrest points out, this cannot exclude the critical details in the name of being in a hurry or you will have beautifully scraped junk. It does take planning, attention to detail and a willingness to simultaneously think in terms of both planar relationships and the means to get there as you also think about individual surfaces.

              On the other hand, I think scraping is not out of the reach of many HSM's as might have been implied, since for most it won't mean rescraping a whole machine...perhaps just work on smaller fixtures like McGyver's "univise" which is a thing of beauty. Its a way for a guy who maybe doesn't own a surface grinder to make some really precise tools like the aforementioned Univise copy. The smaller your work, the smaller your shop made straightedges need to be. Small enough...and you can rub everything to a surface plate, which you can just buy fairly inexpensively. Small items also mean less tedium as the time between successive scraping passes is reduced. Machine way straightedges can be machined to shape and then scraped from a stick of continuous cast iron (DuraBar etc). Someof the best scrapers I have tried are hand made from a piece of steel, a file handle, and a $2 carbide rectangle. I bought two of the commercial ones I have from our own George Matov at a very kind price.

              Still, tying this back to the original topic of the Machine Tool Reconditioning book, I would have to say that short of seeing the scraping stroke and process done by a real person, it might be very hard to get started. MTR is just a (very thorough) reference book and not a "how to" guide. I was very fortunate to have a guy teach me, but as Forrest pointed out, the fact that there are now a few video sources out there makes it possible for many here to try scraping if it sounds useful to them.

              Paul
              Paul Carpenter
              Mapleton, IL

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