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  • Boring Bar??

    I have been looking to purchase a boring bar i once used in a shop i had worked at, It was the nicest best cutting boring bar i ever used. It had a 5/8 shank and was a bit over 4 inches long, At the cutting end there was a slot which held a triangular insert annd a screw clamped the end of the bar tight, It the insert did not have a through hole and it alos used the same inserts as the small milling chippers we used,. A excellant home machinist addition, I am wondering if anyone knows where to buy some of these Thanx Mike

  • #2
    I've got one somewhere.. I ran out of the lil triangles.. them were about $10 a piece for the one I got.

    HSS sharpens cheap and I am cheap..
    Excuse me, I farted.

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    • #3
      They are Everede boring bars, available through most toolhouses. They are among the best, the bars that take the triangular inserts can use either HSS ir carbide inserts. They come in many sizes. The inserts are not cheap, but a couple will last you a long time.

      http://www.everede.net/catalog.htm
      Jim H.

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      • #4
        Jim beat me to it. MSC has them. At the bottom of this page are the inserts.

        http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNPDFF...0&PMT4TP=*LTIP

        I've got a group of boring bars too, that I like a lot.
        .
        "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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        • #5
          I hate boring bars

          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #6
            wow is that the bar in your workshop Evan.I am impressed so much roomAlistair
            Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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            • #7
              Originally posted by JCHannum
              They are Everede boring bars, available through most toolhouses. They are among the best, the bars that take the triangular inserts can use either HSS ir carbide inserts.
              Jim mentioned the Everede boring bars to me a year ago, and I was initially turned-off by the price of the inserts, but WOW, do they work well! The big advantage to the Everede boring bars, at least for a HSM'er, is that you can put a razor-sharp edge on the inserts, so you get a really nice finish, even if you need a lot of overhang.

              I can't get nearly as a good a finish with carbide insert boring bars, probably because they're so dull in comparison, especially the coated carbides.

              So thanks to JC, I've collected a pretty complete set of Everede's, and have been using them almost exclusively.
              "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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              • #8
                I acquired in an auction batch, one of the original type Everede boring bars w/one of those elongated inserts (triangular in x-section), that I've never used. With the insert mounted I've puzzled over the fact that, as provided (flat ground on each end) it has negative clearance.

                I'm now starting to realize (I think) that Everede intends that the user (me) is supposed to grind it to provide the necessary clearance.

                Can someone confirm that?

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                • #9
                  That is the case, the inserts are intended to be ground, not used as-is. The bars come in several configurations and sizes, all using the same insert. There are different sizes inserts of course for different sized boring bars.

                  Here is a photo of three, left to right for finishing a flat bore, internal threading and straight boring.

                  Jim H.

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                  • #10
                    Everede lists "disposable inserts" for the same bars that take the triangular insert. My guess is that its for shops that don't want to do the grinding or perhaps to make their rather unique bar and insert design look as "indexable" as the more common indexable insert bars used today.

                    The disposable ones are carbide and are basically ground to length. There is zero top rake, but you can put that in by turning the bar. There is merely some end clearance ground where you might think it needs it, but the top flat of the triangle is still just flat. They work fine from what I hear although I haven't tried mine. I have some of their bars in seveal sizes. I presumed that most of the stepped bars I have were really for use in boring heads, but I also have one heavy (1") bar with no step that I believe to be a lathe boring bar. That one came with an HSS tool in its mouth and it had more traditional grind to it with some top rake etc. Its HSS....you can make it any shape you want. Edit-- I just saw JC's post above and the "disposable" inserts are ground pretty much like the one he shows on the right.

                    In that sense, its not so unique except for its handy clamping method and triangular shaped bit....which won't rotate like a round tool bit might in a more traditional bar. I bought some of the HSS tool bits to go in them. By buying the longer lengths of these, they can be cut in half to make two (too long to use whole anyway). $2-3 makes two inserts and since they are resharpenable should go a really long way. A guy could have several ground to various rake angles and just swap them out for different purposes...again not a lot different from the age old basic boring bars with round or square tool bit holes at the end. I suppose what is unique is that the same bar can use HSS or carbide "inserts".

                    I look forward to trying out one or more of these bars as every time the subject comes up, they are spoken well of. At least one of the ones I have is "carbide" (for rigidity)...but they even handle that uniquely. It looks like they just lop off the business end of one of their steel bars and braze it to a carbide shank of the same diameter.

                    Paul
                    Last edited by pcarpenter; 05-16-2008, 02:00 PM.
                    Paul Carpenter
                    Mapleton, IL

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                    • #11
                      Here is another type that uses a special "insert" that you must grind to shape. The insert stock is held much like a collet in that the jaws are tightened by screwing them into the bar. This one will fit inside a 1/4" hole.

                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #12
                        Thanks Jim and Paul.
                        I now recall that what was even more confusing about mine is that the end was not ground square to the length of the insert, but actually at an angle that gave it even MORE negative clearance. (As I said, I bought it used)

                        Evan, what's the smaller bar to the left?

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                        • #13
                          That's a neat bar, Evan, and it looks like it should be really nice for some fairly small bores. Who makes it? And yes....what is that other longish item used presumably for reference?

                          Paul
                          Paul Carpenter
                          Mapleton, IL

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                          • #14
                            This is an Everede 3/16" bar, it too will enter a 1/4" hole with room to spare.



                            The shaped cutter in Evan's photo appears the same as the one in the fly cutter. That was made by JDG Tool Co. They also were available from Travers. I don't think they are available any longer.
                            Jim H.

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                            • #15
                              The longish item is the cutter stock. I have about 6" of it left so it should last me a long time.
                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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