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Looking at a Monarch 10EE

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  • Looking at a Monarch 10EE

    I'm thinking of taking a look at this machine: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...tab%3DWatching

    It would be a nice addition to my home shop, but I have obvious concerns. It's only worth having if it works, and this sort of thing can sometimes get pricey if you have to hire high-priced help to get it going. Does anyone have any thoughts?

    Also, these seem to usually require 480 volts, and my rotary phase convertor makes 220 volts. What would a person do about that?

  • #2
    While a 10EE is a fine lathe, its one that merits some homework and study before buying one. You need to know what you are getting into. There are several varieties with vaccuum tube based DC drives etc. When they don't work, they require some expertise to troubleshoot. The motors are a bit unique. Many are replaced with 3ph AC motors and a VFD, but that too requires at least some savvy.

    Don't get me wrong, they are a really cool machine....just not something I would buy without some research. In short, if you are posting here with a "whaddaya think about this lathe" post, you probably have some more reading to do in this case. The sort of person who is happy with a 10EE is the sort of person who knows a lot about them. The Monarch forum over on the PM site is a good resource. Search the archives before asking the really basic questions.

    Edit--I should have looked first. Its a motor-generator model, which is good...provided both are OK. YOu could step up your 220v 3ph out of your RPC with a transformer. Its only got to be smooth enough to run the motor that drives the generator....or replace that "driver" motor.

    Paul
    Last edited by pcarpenter; 05-16-2008, 05:45 PM.
    Paul Carpenter
    Mapleton, IL

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    • #3
      10EEs with the reliance MG are swtchable between 240 and 480 v. The driving motor of the MG set is a 9 wire motor so it can be rewired. The only thing that would have to be changed is the coil on the main contactor behind the head. Or hide a little 240 to 480 control transformer in the coolant pump area like someone did with mine. Dosnt need to be very big, just enough to run the contactor.

      Looks like that machine is going to need some cleaning up. The ways appear to be dinged up by the chuck. Looks like someone snapped of the fwd/rev lever assy too. Cant tell if someone pulled the taper attach or it is one of the rare machines without one.

      Unless you can see it run to check spindle bearing and the like I wouldnt offer more than about 1200.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by timcasbolt
        It would be a nice addition to my home shop, but I have obvious concerns. It's only worth having if it works, and this sort of thing can sometimes get pricey if you have to hire high-priced help to get it going. Does anyone have any thoughts?
        Ohh, I wanna be really honest. I would pass if I were you. The 10EEs are good lathes. But if a concern is being able to work on the electronics I would pass on this one. Not saying it couldnt be made to work in a home shop but its gonna take some work.

        As mentioned, the monarch group on PM is the best source of information and folks willing to help. But you should already be comfortable working on electronics.

        And, one of the appealing things about these lathes are the precision and quality of the whole. With this one already having a banged up bed you can never get it to semi top quality. And with other broken parts I would assume its had a hard life.

        I wouldnt offer more than 800 for it, if I really wanted it. JR
        My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

        https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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        • #5
          At the going rate for scrap I think a 10EE would get somewhere near that $800 mark.

          The electrics are really not that bad. The MGs are dead simple. The wiads are a little more complex and more so with the modular drives. But they can all be repaired.

          Is the machine near enough to you to take a look at in person?

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          • #6
            The one we have at work runs on 220 3 phase. The previous owner tried to change it to 220 but couldn't get it to run, I took off enough coils of the 440 contactor coil to make it work at 220. If the forward rev switch is not in neutral it will not start. When the exciter generator failed about ten years ago I replaced it with a full wave bridge, the lathe has been running fine since then. It should be worth about 600 in scrap but you could part it out for a lot more.
            re
            Herm Williams

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            • #7
              Originally posted by macona

              Is the machine near enough to you to take a look at in person?
              It's 10 minutes from my house. That's the attraction.

              Thanks to all who have replied. I would love to own a lathe like this because of the ability to produce better quality parts, but am still unsure. Might be better to wait for a better machine that costs a little more. I'll make arrangements with the seller to look it over. My Enco lathe is only a few years old and has all the options I like, but in 10 years it will probably be used up, whereas the Monarch will still be splitting tenths in 10 years.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by timcasbolt
                I would love to own a lathe like this because of the ability to produce better quality parts,
                Fiddlesticks. The machinist makes the part, not the machine. A fancier machine makes the part faster or cheaper, not better.

                whereas the Monarch will still be splitting tenths in 10 years.
                Don't count on it. Old Monarchs aren't any more immune to age, wear or abuse than the rest of us.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by rantbot
                  Fiddlesticks. The machinist makes the part, not the machine. A fancier machine makes the part faster or cheaper, not better.


                  Don't count on it. Old Monarchs aren't any more immune to age, wear or abuse than the rest of us.
                  Spoken like a person that has never used a Chinese lathe.

                  Not really sure what your problem is, but this kind of reply doesn't seem to have a place on a friendly site. Perhaps you'd be more comfortable on Practical Machinist.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by timcasbolt
                    Spoken like a person that has never used a Chinese lathe.

                    Not really sure what your problem is, but this kind of reply doesn't seem to have a place on a friendly site. Perhaps you'd be more comfortable on Practical Machinist.
                    ??? What gives? Nothing in Rantbot's post is offensive. It is true. You have to adapt to the features or defficiencies of said piece of equipment. Machinists make quality parts on old, worn equipment. Machinists (loosely termed here) make junk parts with brand new, top of the line equipment.

                    At home my 1939 South Bend is no match, production wise, ease of set up, etc. to my lathe at work, but I will make parts of the same quality with it. Just takes a while (lot) longer.

                    No machine will do ANYTHING by itself. They all require human intervention. I have never seen a machine do anything without it.

                    While some machines may be built better, have more features, or less wear, that may make making parts EASIER on YOURSELF, the are not going to make parts any BETTER. You control the quality of your work. Not the machine.
                    Last edited by ERBenoit; 05-17-2008, 09:56 AM.
                    Paying Attention Is Not That Expensive.

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                    • #11
                      MG's are Easy

                      That old round dial will be one of the easiest Monarch drives to work with. It may be a little noisy, but it will be simple and reliable.

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                      • #12
                        Tim, I don't think Rantbots response was out of line at all. He was telling the truth. Very doubtful that the monarch pictured is capable of still splitting tenths. Sometimes people get the impression that just because of the nameon a machine, such as a Monarch 10EE, they are miraculiously going to be able to do work that they weren't capable of doing before. My 3 year old Jet 13x40 lathe cuts a whole lot straighter than either of the Monarch 10EE's that we have at work, and they are of 1980 vintage, so I doubt that a 1940 model is going to cut real straight. My Jet won't take as heavy of cut as the 10EE's do.
                        Jonathan P.

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