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  • the worst job I ever had

    was running a drill press in the Hewlett-Packard machine shop, but that was only for a day. You will have no trouble topping that.
    Allan Ostling

    Phoenix, Arizona

  • #2
    I worked in a melon packing shed for two summers when I was a teen, besides the head farmer I think I was the only English speaking person out of a couple hundred, it sucked pretty bad but the money was good compared to my friends working fast food.

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    • #3
      Hauling liquified or semi liquified pig [email protected]#T for 8 - 10 hours a day during the summer 85-105 degrees outside. Sometimes with a skid loader sometimes with a shovel. Into the spreader...spread it on the field...back for another laod. If it was liquid enough you had to dump your loader just right or it might splash a few gallons right back over the side of the loader into your lap. Sometimes dead pigs and all went out in the haul. Maggots up to 1 foot thick if you stepped in the wrong place. You always wore knee high rubber boots or you had "things" wriggling in your sock all day Best part...$3.25 per hour, this was back in the early 80's so was way underpaid by any standard.

      Nuf about that...Like dad always said "Builds Character, makes you appreciate what you got...

      Boy, the things my kids will never experience!
      regards

      3t

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      • #4
        Worst Job

        Worst job I ever had was as a tech. in the street department (I was 18). I was in storm sewers cleaning them out. I was at the dump cleaning the debris fences, in the winter. I shoveled asphalt in the summer. I lasted 8 months and was promoted to a delivery job.
        Would not change a thing, beats basic in the marines.

        Lenord

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 3t-
          Hauling liquified or semi liquified pig [email protected]#T for 8 - 10 hours a day during the summer 85-105 degrees outside. Sometimes with a skid loader sometimes with a shovel. Into the spreader...spread it on the field...back for another laod. If it was liquid enough you had to dump your loader just right or it might splash a few gallons right back over the side of the loader into your lap. Sometimes dead pigs and all went out in the haul. Maggots up to 1 foot thick if you stepped in the wrong place. You always wore knee high rubber boots or you had "things" wriggling in your sock all day Best part...$3.25 per hour, this was back in the early 80's so was way underpaid by any standard.

          Nuf about that...Like dad always said "Builds Character, makes you appreciate what you got...

          Boy, the things my kids will never experience!
          OK, you win!
          The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

          Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

          Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 3t-
            Hauling liquified or semi liquified pig [email protected]#T for 8 - 10 hours a day during the summer 85-105 degrees outside. Sometimes with a skid loader sometimes with a shovel. Into the spreader...spread it on the field...back for another laod. If it was liquid enough you had to dump your loader just right or it might splash a few gallons right back over the side of the loader into your lap. Sometimes dead pigs and all went out in the haul. Maggots up to 1 foot thick if you stepped in the wrong place. You always wore knee high rubber boots or you had "things" wriggling in your sock all day Best part...$3.25 per hour, this was back in the early 80's so was way underpaid by any standard.

            Nuf about that...Like dad always said "Builds Character, makes you appreciate what you got...

            Boy, the things my kids will never experience!
            Uggh my dad raised pigs and it was always my job to catch the young ones for shots and catrations etc, the stink they put on you is hard to get off with anything short of straight gasoline.

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            • #7
              Well, there are a few nasty things about the job that I still have after 29 years. I still work at the local garbage company. The most miserable, without any doubt is welding patches in the hopper of a garbage wagon. patch over the top of another patch. The juice gets trapped in between layers and sizzles when you weld on yet another repair. OOOOHYA, smells SOOO good.

              TC
              I cut it off twice; it's still too short
              Oregon, USA

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              • #8
                I had many crappy jobs early on ranging from working in a paper egg carton factory to changing tires to cleaning rest rooms.

                But, the worst of all was the 23 years I spent working for Xerox. It wasn't always that way. When I started it was a good job for a good company with rapid advances in responsibility and pay grade. I was very good at my work and it suited my individualistic tendencies since the job requires one to nearly always work without supervision.

                I started in 1975 and it paid well up through the middle of the 1980's. Then an insidious trend developed. The emphasis changed as did Xerox's position in the marketplace. The competition from Japan was intense and Xerox wasn't keeping up. They struggled to catch up and in doing so the accountants began to run the company. For the first time a vice president of Service Operations was appointed that had no background in the service organization. Workloads were slowly ratcheted upward and pay scales stagnated. As the 80's became the 90's the it only grew worse. General moral among the work force began to plummet and the company began to divest divisions to "concentrate on core business", meaning they were bleeding money so fast they couldn't count it. Through the 90's I averaged less than 2% increase in wages per year, less than the inflation rate. At the same time my workload grew from an average of 1.2 heads to as high as 2.0 and that was according to the company's method of counting it. For the last 6 to 7 years I consistently was responsible for two service territories in towns separated by 75 miles as well as all types of equipment scattered across an area of about 25,000 square miles.

                As I struggled to keep up with this the working environment deteriorated. Xerox dismissed most of the service managers with the result that the span of control changed from one manager for every 20 to 30 people to 3 managers for 350 people in this province. It meant that it was impossible to get help with matters outside of your job when requested to do so by a customer, such as a billing problem. At the same time the general tone in management/employee relations deteriorated so far that even low and middle tier management complained freely in front of people like myself, the field reps. In 1997 the company found itself against the wall financially with no more than a couple of months operating capital remaining, perhaps only weeks left. At the same time near the end of 1997 I was informed that one of the people on my service team (a fiction since I was never involved in the actual team because of distance) had been promoted to Vancouver and his position would not be filled. I was expected to help fill the empty slot by driving an additional 50 miles further north with the resulting deterioration of my ability to provide service to my regular customer base, many of whom I had known for as long as two decades.

                That finally was for me the last straw. There were many others piled on one at a time that I haven't mentioned here. On the first working day of 1998 I informed Xerox that I would be resigning my position. I e-mailed, faxed, left voice mail and sent registered mail to five different people in the company explaining this and giving five weeks notice because of the difficulty of replacing me in this territory. This wasn't out of consideration for Xerox but for my customers.

                I also informed them I would be driving to Vancouver in three weeks and would stop in the main office for an exit interview and whatever else they deemed necessary such as turning over assets such as computers, spare parts etc.

                When I arrived in Vancouver in three weeks time the first person I visited was one of the remaining service managers. When he saw me he asked what I was doing in Vancouver. Apparently he hadn't bothered to check his mail and neither had any of the other four people I had notified. Either that or they didn't take my resignation seriously even though I had never before so much as mentioned it as a possibility let alone use it as some sort of threat.

                They now only had two weeks to find a replacement. In all, I ended up finishing work without an exit interview, without signing any confidentiality or non-disclosure agreements and without any form of termination review or even accounting of company assets.

                It took Xerox six weeks to cut my last check and 3 months to pay out my very considerable profit sharing and pension plan. It took an additional 3 months of me pestering them and finally threatening small claims court action to have my final expense report paid.
                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tim Clarke
                  Well, there are a few nasty things about the job that I still have after 29 years. I still work at the local garbage company. The most miserable, without any doubt is welding patches in the hopper of a garbage wagon. patch over the top of another patch. The juice gets trapped in between layers and sizzles when you weld on yet another repair. OOOOHYA, smells SOOO good.

                  TC
                  Been there, done that, just read the above and it reminded me of that delicious aroma, boy, it was so thick, you could chew on it, now I have to go and puke.`

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                  • #10
                    Meet my supervisor: Pete Puma.

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                    • #11
                      When I was young I once worked in a sawmill stacking timbers from morning til night in all weathers outside.Man it was boring boring drive you crazy.Alistair
                      Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                      • #12
                        Cleaning/ repairing the inside of a rendering cooker, Upside was finding all the cow magnets and keeping them.

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                        • #13
                          The one I have now. It isn't the work so much, although 'good enough for our purposes' isn't a standard I'm used to working with. The boss and his family are the reasons I hate the place. There simply isn't enough time to into the whole thing now. maybe later.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by radish1us
                            Been there, done that, just read the above and it reminded me of that delicious aroma, boy, it was so thick, you could chew on it, now I have to go and puke.`

                            LMAO !!! I almost spit my coffee out !!
                            "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" Thomas Edison

                            Better to have tools you don't need than to need tools you don't have

                            73's KB3BFR

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                            • #15
                              Worst job?There have been so many.

                              I guess near the top was shingling helper,100lb bundles of tar shingles lugged up on the roof in 100+ weather.

                              Also changing out head rollers and drives on concrete conveyor lines,100+ heat plus cemet dust
                              I just need one more tool,just one!

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