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What have I done now?? (Got the (new) old VN home!

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  • What have I done now?? (Got the (new) old VN home!

    Really... It didn't look that big in the pics.
    Had to get a 980 Cat to unload it. Couldn't even get it under my lifting beam outside my shop.
    And the extras!!! A good size lil' tool box chock full of collets, ems,great big dividing head... 4 /50 taper arbors...
    Pics at 11...
    Anyone want a deal on a nice old Ohio Universal..
    Russ
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

  • #2
    Oh sure....a teaser with no pictures.

    Paul
    Paul Carpenter
    Mapleton, IL

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    • #3
      Originally posted by pcarpenter
      Oh sure....a teaser with no pictures.

      Paul
      I'll get them... it's pouring rain so it's tarped... and I'm still in shock!
      This thing is beautiful!!! Got a factory mount BP head on it... my motor from my other mill will bolt right in.. this one is 550V...I can't power it up very easy.
      It'll be a little underpowered with only a 3hp 3ph but it'll do fine.
      All this.. $1200 Cnd.... and delivered to my door from 300 miles away over two steep mountain passes... heh heh... nobody else wanted it... it's too big.
      I have tools I don't even know I own...

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      • #4
        It quit raining for a bit...
        Here is the lil' thing..
        OK.. it's not all that big but it makes my Ohio look like a toy.
        This is about 4500 pounds. EDIT.. (it actaully weighs about 6200 or so as it sits...ouch)


        Is this an "M" head?
        Last edited by torker; 06-01-2008, 11:24 PM.
        I have tools I don't even know I own...

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        • #5
          A couple of the rest of the extras..

          I have tools I don't even know I own...

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          • #6
            Looks like a good deal if it runs as supposed too.

            mark61

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            • #7
              Looks REAL good. But think I will keep my VN 12
              That thing should move some metal in a hurry.Good buy.
              Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
              http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
              http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

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              • #8
                Lane... I'd have room for your #12 This one... may have to put up a building around it. It will stick out from a wall 6 1/2 feet.
                Geez... bonus.. I found out this thing is a Universal!!!
                Now all I need to do is figure out how to disengage or unlock the X travel.
                Got y working fine.
                So far the table/knee travel isn't quite as silky smooth as the Ohio. but I think the knee and tables weigh as much as the Ohio does.
                Can't find any broken gears yet... so far I'm light years ahead of where I was with the ol' Ohio.
                I have tools I don't even know I own...

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                • #9
                  Torker, your Bridgeport head is an M-head, spindle taper will be mt-2 or B&S#7. I think it will be 1/2 hp.

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                  • #10
                    Quasi... Yup, You're right on all counts. I went to Tony's UK site and read about it. Not the most desirable BP head for sure but it seems in good shape and dead simple.
                    Pretty light duty head though. Other than power down and the tilting feature I really can't see where this would be better than my 2hp mill/drill.
                    Everything is stouter on the M/D, R-8 and it has way more power.
                    Oh... guess I should put on my BP flamesuit???
                    I have tools I don't even know I own...

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                    • #11
                      The Dividing head showen is from a Cincinnatti Milling machine. Our's had a 3jaw chuck mounted on a 50 NMTB taper that fit into the dividing head. Don't lift using the over arm support, better to lock the knee, move the table to middle of it's travel, sling between the knee and main base, behind the knee lift screw, and a couple of eye bolts in the rear anchor bolt holes. Use slings long enough to go above the over arm, and connect with a large clevis.
                      Last edited by vmil3; 05-30-2008, 11:30 AM.
                      Doug

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                      • #12
                        Doug-- you may know better than I, but most of the knee mills I have seen have some sort of bronze feed nut that the knee elevation screw runs in. I would hate to hang the whole thing by some acme threads in a bronze nut.

                        Russ-- I can't see what the knuckle looks like that mounts the M head, but it may be that the most valuable thing you have is that mount--if it could be used to mount a more modern J-head etc. Its not that there's anything wrong with that M head and likely for end milling its probably perfectly adequate, but spending a bunch of money on MT or B&S collets and other tooling could be annoying. I see more modern Bridgeport heads go pretty cheap from time to time on Ebay etc.

                        That's certainly a stout mill you have there! Good luck getting it all set up. A corner may be the most efficient location. I also can't help noting the irony--didn't you have as your first problem with the Ohio an issue with one of the feeds being stuck engaged?

                        Paul
                        Paul Carpenter
                        Mapleton, IL

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                        • #13
                          Doug... the overarm has big slots in it that have been used to lift this a few times in the past it looks like. They used chains etc...you can see the "chain tracks" in the slots. My Ohio has a lifting eye screwed into the top of the overarm for lifting as well. This over arm is very heavy. I'm not saying it is the right place to lift it but you also had to be there.
                          The guy was from Calgary, rented a trailer here but had to have it back before the rental place closed...then he had to rush home.We couldn't get the machine under my lifting beam... the big chainfall was too low and there was no way to lift it.. I even let the air out of the guys trailer tires but it wouldn't work.
                          There was a 980 working across the road, feeding a rock crusher. I asked the guy if he could come and lift the mill for me. He said "Yup... you got 5 minutes... that's it"
                          So a lot of preplanning time wasn't there.
                          Paul.. the head mount must be a factory piece. It's made to fit the overarm perfectly and it looks as though another more modern BP head would work.
                          Yes.. you are right about the Ohio... it was rusted so badly I couldn't tell what was binding where and actually bust the driveshaft when the knee finally popped loose. I'm trying to avoid any such issues with this. Going slow is the word. I only have a few minutes here and there to play with it so it could be awhile.
                          I have tools I don't even know I own...

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                          • #14
                            Hey Doug... are you very familiar with this type of dividing head? I'm a little unsure how the grads work. There are no numbers on the main plate(so I'll have to count ALL the holes?)....then there are a bunch of holes and a sort of floating pin for holes that are behind the chuck mounting plate. There are three rows of holes behind that plate.
                            Any idears which you use where?
                            Thanks!
                            Russ
                            I have tools I don't even know I own...

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                            • #15
                              Clean the index plates up, each row of holes should have a number, and the numbers will be lined up. That head also has direct indexing, but the worm gear has to be disengaged. Cincinnati made excellent DH's with a unique feature; the plates have a serrated section for fine adjustment, it's pretty easy to figure out.
                              IIRC, there are 2 index plates, double sided, supplied when new. Machinery's Handbook has the charts right after the B&S charts.
                              Harry
                              Last edited by beckley23; 05-30-2008, 11:07 PM.

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