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Help with 15" craftman scrollsaw cam problem

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  • Help with 15" craftman scrollsaw cam problem

    Woodworking forums have been no help...

    My step dad gave me an old scrollsaw before he died and he said there was a cam problem. I know its more than 20 years old. I do have a metal lathe and milling machine if I have to make new parts I can.




    Its model number 572.247202

    Is there a manual online for this machine? Where do I start to tear it down to inspect the cam? How do I change the blade?

    I know nothing of this little machine but would like to repair it and use it.

    here is how it acts in use, it will cut 1/8" but anything like 1/4" the stoke length stops and it stops cutting.

    Any help would be appreciated,,

    thank you ,

    Mike.

  • #2
    have had good luck here: http://www.searspartsdirect.com/part...0071217x00001a
    Hey, it's worth a try.............
    "Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not."~ Thomas Jefferson

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    • #3
      Scroll Saw

      Mike...I have a Dremel scroll saw of the same vintage and they look identical. Removal of the blade on mine is just a spring on the head that you push down until the little cross pins come out of a groove top and bottom. You might find some info from the Dremel folks that would help. I would bet that the Craftsman was made by them.

      It will be well worth fixing up.
      Jim (KB4IVH)

      Only fools abuse their tools.

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      • #4
        To release the blade, don't you lift up that little tab sticking out the top front?

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        • #5
          Thanks that parts diagram is so pixilated its not funny.

          Im just a bit leary of tear down after working on stuff like the like the old clothes dryers. you pull 7 screws and it falls into 149 peices..

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Scishopguy
            Mike...I have a Dremel scroll saw of the same vintage and they look identical. Removal of the blade on mine is just a spring on the head that you push down until the little cross pins come out of a groove top and bottom. You might find some info from the Dremel folks that would help. I would bet that the Craftsman was made by them.

            It will be well worth fixing up.
            If does have and Accessory flex shaft that takes dremel collets and tools. Thats good info to figure the unit out.

            I went to our farmers maket the other day and saw some nice stuff made on a scroll saw and would like to have one that works.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by tattoomike68
              .....Im just a bit leary of tear down after working on stuff like the like the old clothes dryers. you pull 7 screws and it falls into 149 peices..
              HEY, no guts, no glory...............
              "Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not."~ Thomas Jefferson

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              • #8
                Originally posted by smiller6912
                HEY, no guts, no glory...............
                Ok, I will see how good it is....

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                • #9
                  Gutted?

                  Originally posted by tattoomike68
                  .....Im just a bit leary of tear down after working on stuff like the like the old clothes dryers. you pull 7 screws and it falls into 149 peices..
                  Originally posted by smiller6912
                  HEY, no guts, no glory...............
                  Or all guts - all gory?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Advice from the Old Wood Working Machines website:

                    # Copies of manuals for many vintage Craftsman machines are still available. Call the Sears Parts Line, 1-800-469-4663, and have your model number ready.
                    # If the Sears Parts Line does not have the manual you need, try emailing Sam Anderson at sande38 (at) sears.com (replace (at) with the @ sign)

                    Worth a shot.
                    Rolla

                    Newbie or not a Newbie, there's always a question.
                    damifino

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                    • #11
                      I had a similar Dremel one, and it tended to self-destruct. By all means if you can either repair or replace the cam cheaply, go for it, but do not have high expectations. This kind of scroll saw, with a spring on top, can do lots of work, but it's slow and requires a very steady hand, as well as careful setup, to avoid breaking blades at a rate that makes blade cost a real factor. The tension on the blade is maintained only by the return spring, so if you push too hard or unevenly, the blade will bow and break. If you are serious about wanting to do scroll saw work, you'll do much better with even a relatively cheap newer one that uses a full frame (both top and bottom arms move together). On this type, the tension on the blade is constant, making it much easier to push the work in without bowing it and breaking it. You can get a new Ryobi or Chinese-made Delta or the like for something around a hundred bucks. You can still break blades if you push too hard, but once you get the technique sorted out, you'll be able to do scroll work in 2 inch lumber with ease.

                      An added benefit of some of these newer saws is that they take blades either with or without pins. This means, among other things, that you can recycle broken bandsaw blades for coarse work.

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