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Router bits on mild steel??

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  • Router bits on mild steel??

    I hope you all say yes! I'm stuck. We made some really snazzy door handles... a recess in flat plate. The recess is 1" wide, 1/2" deep and 5" long.
    I "hand" rounded the edges over on one before I welded the bottom in. Looks "ok" but not what this fussy bugger is after.
    Ummm... got in a hurry and forgot to round the edges over on the other one. The gurl tigged the bottom on.. all purty and everything... cept I didn't round over the edges. Now I need an easy way to do this.
    Would a wood router bit (round over)with the bearing work for this in a mill?
    I have some really pricey ones and don't want to wreck one just to try it.
    Thanks!
    Russ
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

  • #2
    Router bits on mild steel??

    I have never tried a wood router bit in a milling machine on mild steel, but I know when i hit a nail once with my router it destroyed the bit although it did cut the nail off. Maybe a solid carbide one would work.

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    • #3
      It would have to be turning dead slow with plenty of coolant.In one of the shops I worked in they had a job cutting steel blocks and used a carbide tipped skill saw blade,slow speed,slow feed,worked great.

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      • #4
        Enco has corner rounding end mills, all sizes, radiuses, HHS, cobalt, what ever suits your job. I am sure your favorite Canadian supplier has them available too. JIM
        jim

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        • #5
          Hmmm.. the round over bits I have are two flute. Two flute and low rpm???
          Would that matter?
          I have tools I don't even know I own...

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          • #6
            If it was my shop, I would cut a radius on a piece of similar material and see what happens. A bit of experimenting with speeds and feeds to see what works best. What ever it takes to please the customer, then collect the money!! MY .02$ JIM
            jim

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            • #7
              Never tried it Russ,aluminum and brass yes,but steel no.

              Dig out your body armor and tell us how it worked will you
              I just need one more tool,just one!

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              • #8
                Carbide inserted router bits will work on steel
                Coolant, slow speed a must
                and chatter can be a problem as the shanks are 1/4 " diameter and that reduces the capacity/load
                Keep the radius small to reduce this effect.
                Rich
                Do NOT use a router !
                Green Bay, WI

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                • #9
                  I've tried it on mild steel with a 1/2 shanked carbide router bit from Grizzly, one of their house brands I think it was. Lots of coolant, slow speed, slow feed, little to no chatter, but as I said it was one of the 1/2 shank bits, not the smaller 1/4 inch.
                  Good luck Russ!
                  Steve
                  NRA Life Member

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                  • #10
                    Russ, as others have said...it works on alum. .Have You thought about a carbide burr in a die grinder to knock off the bulk of the material and then maybe finish it off with a small grinding wheel dressed to the radius desired.
                    Steve

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                    • #11
                      I have used router bits in aluminum but not mild steel. If using a mill slow it down and use HSS. if all you have is a router and carbide endmills then put in earplugs and a full face shield and dig in. Have a friend shoot WD40 at the bit or whatever being you are ghetto milling. hell use water just keep it pumping before the bits get hot.

                      nothing is impossible..

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                      • #12
                        I've used the 1/2 inch shanks on steel with satisfactory resuls, mostly used them for aluminum though.
                        With aluminum it's a fairly cheap profile cutter. find one near the right profile and with a bit of grinder work you can make the exact profile needed.

                        Ken.

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                        • #13
                          Russ, I made this cutter out of some mystery metal, its hard but who knows what its is , I needed 1/2 of a 1/4" profile to cut what you see out of CRS, I ran it slow, cut about 10 parts and the cutter is still sharp, I forget how I heat treated it maybe used some casenit to help it out. If you have some drill rod it might be good enuff for one job.





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                          • #14
                            do you have access to a Metal Shaper?

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                            • #15
                              Dewat... nice cutter you made there!
                              Guys here's what i'm dealing with. The one that sits crossways... didn't round over the inner oval. I can file the edges over... but it'd take a long time to do the round parts.
                              I have tools I don't even know I own...

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