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Lest we forget

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  • Lest we forget

    I just need one more tool,just one!

  • #2
    Lest we forget

    A few years ago a lady told me that she was taking her husband back onto the Beaches. He had 'gone in' like so many into that Hell some call D-Day.
    She wasn't going to be properly dressed for the occasion.One thing was missing and it was the simple brass 'Other Ranks' cap badge that the Women's Royal Air Force wore and off duty they wore on their shoulder bags.

    Well folks, this little lady fighter controller who was part of the battle got her cap badge.

    Well, correction, mine!

    Cpl.2400915 Atkinson.N
    The Goldstars, RAF 31Squadron Association

    To 'Lummie' Lord VC and the rest of them- who never came home
    'Well done thou good and faithful servants, enter into the joy of thine Lord'

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    • #3
      I cant even begin to imagine what must have transpired there that day. I can read books, watch movies and even travel to the site. But the idea of a farm boy from Iowa (this would be the US view) who never left the county he was born in, being plucked out of his environment, traveling by steam train to the coast, some quick training if lucky, jumping on a ship to steam to a land that he may only have heard about (let alone read about or even saw photos of) to then jump on a transport and head to a beach where he knew he may not ever leave alive to fight an army he may not have thought would ever be a threat to him for others who didnt even speak his language. As soon as he jumps off the transport into the water, he sees death everywhere. Hell seems like a mild word here.

      What must have been going through his mind! I thank every one of those brave men, including my grandfather, who marched over most of Europe with the military trying to end the threat.

      Let us always remember these horrific days, save the knowledge of what happened to cause these events and pass that understanding to our children in the hopes that this educates them so that they may never have to live through the same torment, death and fear.

      rock~
      Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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      • #4
        That must have been a horrible thing to go through.
        My mom went out with a guy for a short time in the 60's. A big bugger, really nice guy but he turned out to be an alcoholic.
        Poor guy... he'd get drunk and just fall apart. He was in on that, along with almost all his school mates that he grew up with. He was the only one of those kids that made it. All the rest died on that beach. He never got over it.
        He died a lonely man with a mind full of nightmares that never stopped.
        Russ
        I have tools I don't even know I own...

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        • #5
          Amen !
          davidh

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          • #6
            My great Uncle, who just died, was a tank commander in the 2nd Armoured. He would only tell you two stories about that time there. One was about them getting in around the German pillboxes and blowing the doors off with the main gun, and inviting the Germans to surrender. The second was about them rolling into Berlin like they were on a Sunday drive--then came an emergency order to "pull back". They were ordered back about 60 miles. The German reinforcements showed up and built defences into Berlin. It took them two weeks to win back ground they had sped through as fast as their tanks could go. Later, he found out it was done so the Russians could get their piece of Berlin. Not Happy!

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            • #7
              i talked to one d-day vet. he was a substitute teacher. well he kids were trying to give him a hard time. he just stood up and with a clear and firm voice said.

              i landed on omaha beach chased the germans out of france. so there is nothing you little bastereds can say or do that can even come close to upsetting me.

              he got the respect of every one.

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              • #8
                Since you guys brought freedom to my country, I remember the date every year.

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                • #9
                  In the news, today. Not a big story, but a story about a big story and the little things that made life bearable: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new...cle4124354.ece

                  It's a shame these artifacts didn't have better protection but hell, I guess they're just grafitti in the final analysis.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dp
                    In the news, today. Not a big story, but a story about a big story and the little things that made life bearable: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new...cle4124354.ece

                    It's a shame these artifacts didn't have better protection but hell, I guess they're just grafitti in the final analysis.
                    I read the story, and yes, it's rather sad.

                    But I got a good laugh from the comments, one reader invited us to Google 'French Military Victories' and hit the I'm feeling lucky' button.

                    I did. Here's the result:

                    Did you mean: french military defeats




                    No standard web pages containing all your search terms were found.

                    Your search - french military victories - did not match any documents.


                    Guess there's nothing on the Internet about Napoleon?

                    Walt

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DancingBear
                      .

                      Guess there's nothing on the Internet about Napoleon?

                      Walt
                      - The Napoleonic Wars
                      - Lost. Temporary victories (remember the First Rule!) due to leadership of a Corsican, who ended up being no match for a British footwear designer.
                      I just need one more tool,just one!

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                      • #12
                        Lest we forget

                        My wife and I have visited the D-Day memorial in Bedford VA twice now.

                        http://neme-s.org/D_Day_Memorial/Nat...Memorial_1.htm

                        I have nothing but the most profound respect for all who have served their country. Knowing that this in as international forum I include that respect to all veterans, anywhere.

                        Within 15 mmiles of our home is the U.S. Submarine Memorial in Groton CT.

                        http://neme-s.org/Big_Crane/big_floa...rane_and_u.htm

                        Again, my thanks and respect to all who served.
                        Errol Groff

                        New England Model Engineering Society
                        http://neme-s.org/

                        YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/GroffErrol?feature=mhee

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                        • #13
                          Lest we forget

                          Lest we forget????? I 'live' in France or should I say, 'I live part of the time'
                          and I have to say that my wife and I stood at Vimy Ridge War Memorial on Sunday 3rd September on year at precisely 11AM which was the date and time that Britain, her Empire and France went to war in 1939. Her dad was a RAF 31 Squadron-er like me and we were the only ones!

                          Vimy marks the sacrifice of our Canadian brothers in the Great War. How can any one be bothered with trees which are probably at the end of their lives make news in comparison to the travesty of forgetting the slaughter? Does any one realise that there is so much live ammunition underground that it is only safe to walk in roped areas? You know your boys died there in as well.

                          In the past few hours I got a slamming in Practical Machinist. I had been a kid at the beginning of the last war and like every other British kid had taken his or her place to 'do one's bit' in what was total war involving men, women and tiny children. You know I was machine gunned and bombed repeatedly but that experience was repeated in almost every home.the guy could not come to terms with the fact that kids took part in the war effort in hundreds of ways- and then put their uniforms on and hopefully came home and were reservists for decades after.

                          My only thought was that he regarded himself as a social unequal in when his turn came- he did'nt put on a uniform.

                          I don't know what is happening over in your part of the Pond but more and more old vets are finally putting up defiant vets badges alongside their old outfit badge.

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                          • #14
                            I don't think anyone cares about the trees - it's the inscriptions that are the point of interest. It is the only part of the forest after all these years that said 'soldiers were here and they left a note to us that we would remember'. The trees were only the messenger and they are killed.

                            I have an aquaintance who served as navigator on a B-24 called "Racy Tomato". I have a wonderful image of the nose art from that plane. The aircraft was lost in the English Channel and there it remains. I would be offended if it were dredged up to make room for a water front condo.

                            It is probably no accident that the word 'desecration' is ugly both to the ear and to the senses.

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                            • #15
                              Lest we forget

                              Dennis
                              It is a sad fact that trees like us die. It is a sad fact that a B-24 lies in the English Channel. Nothing would please me more than seeing it come up and the remains of both the aircraft and its gallant crew in a more fitting resting place. After all, it could be smashed into oblivion with repeated fishing etc. The English Channel is busy and very shallow.

                              It is probably 60+ years since it crashed. Probably there is only a few fragments to mark the sacrifice by now. You see, I am 'old mountain rescue' and have dived on wrecks as well. As far as crashes on mountain and moorland were concerned, if the aircraft could not be recovered easily, it was buried. I once wrote of B-17 which crashed on the same day as Glenn Miller was lost. Believe me, I have been 'there' too many times.

                              I can say in what must be a gloomy reply that one of our Spitfires is still airworthy and that 2 Devons and 2 Antarctic Austers are preserved. Our dear old VP-981 which served as the hack for the BBMF is still around- somewhere.
                              that old girl and I go back a long way

                              For my period of service, all I have is one photo and a stolen RAF spoon.

                              Life is like that

                              Norm

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