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3/16" taps???

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  • 3/16" taps???

    Did I read somewhere that 3/16" taps are hard to work with? Fragile compared to #10?
    Figures... the lawyer wants socket head hardware on all the stuff we're making him.
    He dug through my bolt bins and came up with one he HAD to have for the door handles. 3/16X24. I can't get #10's here without ordering them in.
    We need this done by next wednesday so I'm hoping the 3/16" taps will be ok for tapping a little better than 3/4" deep. I'm thinking sloooow and easy???
    Thanks!
    Russ
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

  • #2
    Doesn't it depend more on the style and material of the tap than anything else. A 4 flute hand tap is weaker than a 2 flute spiral point tap or not to mention EMSS taps.

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    • #3
      I'm sure it does matter.. I just seem to remember someone saying that 3/16" taps were a bugger to use. I could be wr wr wr... mistaken...
      I have tools I don't even know I own...

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      • #4
        why so deep ? standard practice when i was in eng;r was 1-1/2 times the diameter. . . . . or thereabouts. i must be missing someting here.

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        • #5
          Russ,
          Hand tapping with small taps can be precarious at best, you hit on a couple important steps, here are few to add to "Slow and Easy". Hand tapping is definitely feeling the cut and is learned, once the cut starts you should not stop until you get that feel(that is the learned part) you just are gonna break a few, from the things I see you working on, it's a pretty sure bet you already know that.

          1) High quality tap.
          2) What ever it takes to keep the tap straight.
          3) Back out for chip clearing often
          4) Use tapping fluids.

          Ken

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          • #6
            This is for door hardware.. think of how the usual door knob is held in place.
            This is for sorta the same thing. He's refinishing some antique doors and isn't sure on the final thickness. I need to make these sorta flexible..
            1/2" depth threads may work but 3/4" would be better.
            I have tools I don't even know I own...

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            • #7
              I can't think of any reason that a 3/16-24 tap should be weaker than a #10-24. They are the same size and if the same quality there should be no difference. They are still small enough to break when hand tapping but not that easy. I've never broken a tap larger than a #6 by hand or power and I power tap most everything except the really small ones or in really tough materials. Of course all bets are off if you aren't using a quality tap in good condition.
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #8
                Torker, drill the tap hole oversize-as much as you dare! Example:- #10-24 calls for a #27 for a full (75%,) thread yet a #22 will give a 63% thread AND tap a lot easier. Remember, you are only holding a door knob, not the front suspension on a Pacific logging truck. Then if you REALLY have no faith, use a drop of blue Locktite.
                Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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                • #9
                  Duffy.. good call. I think I'll go the oversize drill bit route and get it over with.
                  Thanks!
                  Russ
                  I have tools I don't even know I own...

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                  • #10
                    Also, use finer thread/per inch when possible, as the finer the TPI the less thread depth, meaning less metal to remove. Also use a starting tap, then finish with a plug or bottom tap as you see fit. Dont forget to use very high quality tapping oil. JIM
                    jim

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                    • #11
                      The one tap size I dislike is 6-32, due to the threads being rather deep in relation to the major diameter of the thread. Makes 'em easy to break.

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                      • #12
                        x39 is correct, the 6-32 is more prone to breakage due to the diameter to thread depth relationship.

                        3/16" & #10 taps are not the same size, 3/16" is marginally smaller and will be more fragile, but an oversize hole will ease the force required.
                        Jim H.

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                        • #13
                          3/16" & #10 taps are not the same size
                          I knew sombody would come along to point that out. I didn't say "exactly the same size". It's close enough that there is no difference in the strength of the taps, which was my point.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                          • #14
                            Are they truly 3/16" or are the hardware stores calling #10's 3/16"?
                            I just noticed 3/16' bolts at the local hardware store and I thought I had the fastener section memorized. It seems weird that manufacturers would make two different sizes of nearly identical bolts and buy two different sets of nearly identical tooling. The major diameter of a 10-24 is .189 to 1818. My handbook doesn't list 3/16" but I would guess they would be .1875' to .1803" (?).
                            Jon Bohlander
                            My PM Blog

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                            • #15
                              Gun Taps

                              Toker,
                              I just did a job that required 1/2" deep 4-40 in 316 stainless.
                              After I busted 6 taps off in almost finished parts I bit the bullet and bought 6 spiral fluted gun taps at $16.00 each from McMaster carr.

                              They were cobalt with a special coating...worked great.
                              Drilling a bit big doesn't hurt either.
                              PaulF

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