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  • Heat Treating oven

    I bought a new toy today. I have always wanted to do some heat treating. Beyond the standard propane torch and bucket of oil which I have decent results with.

    I work with simple steels such as O-1, W-1, 4140 and 4340. Would be nice to play with some high speed steel some day too.

    Anyway, I have been looking for some time and wanted an electric furnace just for the ease of use. A digital control for ease and controllability too..

    I considered making my own, specially after seeing the costs of the new ones. I looked for a used one but they were mostly just too large.

    I am thinking the semi-inexpensive pottery kilns should do the job.. I settled on Paragon because they have a few units with a front door instead of a top hatch. The front loader will work better for me in my shop due to a limited amount of space. Ill have to move the ultrasonic cleaner and ronco rotisserie somewhere though.. I love chicken outta that ronco!!!!

    So I was eyeballin three diff models. The SC2, SC3 and the E14 which all have the same controller. After thinking about the internal dimensions I thought the SC models were gonna be pretty tight if I had a larger batch or a larger single item. So I settled on the E14.

    The SC models are really nice looking units and 120v instead of 220v for folks with power issues. And they are about half the price so I can recommend them just from those points.

    The E14 has a top heat of 2000 degrees. I am thinking it will work for my steels. And with the digital control I can draw the steel down in the garage instead of bringing the part in the house and pissing off you know who.. LOL

    I ordered it with an optional 2x2" viewing port cause Im nosy and wanna watch my metal cook

    Ordered three ceramic shelves, encase I break them. Some posts in various sizes... It was free shipping which is good cause it says truck shipping only for this one...

    So anyway, Ill be sure to give a review once its all up and running... JR

    Oh, and if doesn't work so well as a heat treating oven Ill just get a new hobby, glass and pottery!!!!

    http://www.paragonweb.com/E14AXPRESS.cfm

    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  • #2
    Out of curiosity, why did you get the e14 instead of something like the HT14 which is supposed to be a heat treating furnace with a more sophisticated control?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ckelloug
      Out of curiosity, why did you get the e14 instead of something like the HT14 which is supposed to be a heat treating furnace with a more sophisticated control?
      Oh, thats a simple one.. MONEY Gotta put a stop to the upward spiral of costs. I originally wanted to stay at 600 bucks with the SC series... The E14 was $1097 delivered.... JR
      My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

      https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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      • #4
        Can an over like this be used as a casting furnace?

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        • #5
          Ahh. You failed to mention the price gloat. I looked at the web prices where they're 500 more period and only 600 more for the one with the heat treating controller. Good purchase!

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          • #6
            At the risk of hijacking this thread....

            I have a Johnson casting furnace that I was once going to convert to LP and use for its intended purpose. As it became more apparent that it was one more thing I did not need to get involved in, I decided that if the right opportunity came along I would sell it.

            Now I am wondering if that too would be usable for heat treating? Any ideas? I know it gets hot enough to melt aluminum (somewhere in the 2200 degree range?) which is what it did in its previous life, but don't know how well controlled it would be for something like heat treating. I also believe that I know that it pretty much bathes the crucible in flame, so that too could be an issue? Because its for use with crucibles, it has a round bore maybe 8-10" in diameter designed to be fed from the top which is probably a less than ideal layout. I am guessing that my HF weed burner pointed into a tube of fire brick may be a more efficient route too since the Johnson furnace is supposed to be something like 125k BTUs. Any advice? Have any of you used a casting furnace for heat treating?

            Paul
            Paul Carpenter
            Mapleton, IL

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            • #7
              I've got a new HT22

              http://www.paragonweb.com/HT22D.cfm

              with the vertically-lifting door of the F250 and 2350F temp instead of 2000F (and NO charge for those changes) that should be here by the end of the month. The vertical door means the control has to be remote, but I wasn't keen on the idea of reaching past an 1800F door. Prices at kilndr.com are significantly lower than the MSRP and they were recommended to me by several people who have been pleased in their dealings with them.

              My wife wanted something to cook precious metal clay for her jewelery hobby and I figured adding some money to that would get an oven that I could also use to heat treat metal. Then I realized that if it can melt silver it will melt aluminum so I'm going to see how it works for that. I've wanted to try foundry work for quite some time, but I didn't want a gas burner furnace roaring away in the back yard because I try to keep a pretty low noise level here at home.

              It appears that these ovens aren't ideal for melting aluminum as they take longer than a gas furnace. But I'm not going to be doing production or commercial work so if it takes an extra 30-45 minutes (actual time to be determined) that's no big deal for me.

              cheers,
              Michael
              Last edited by Michael Moore; 06-10-2008, 08:10 PM.

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              • #8
                I have a Paragon KM-14. I've owned it for twenty years and it has been quite handy. The only trouble I've had with it was about a year ago when the heating element broke. It was an easy fix.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Michael Moore
                  I've got a new HT22
                  Michael
                  Hey Michael, thats one nice oven. And smart to be able to have it serve double duty.. Im gonna be afraid to open my electric bill after firing this guy. But its still gonna be less than my gasoline bill and I dont drive anywhere!!! JR

                  Oh, and that site you put up has great prices, specially it you can go local to pick it up. I was afraid of what truck shipping would be these day, diesel fuel is outta control!!!!!
                  My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It won't be that bad, the electric bill that is.

                    That's a relatively small kiln.

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                    • #11
                      About US$320 for truck shipment (residential w/lift gate) from Mesquite TX to SF CA.

                      I figured that any local dealer would still be stuck with freight from TX to CA. On these heavier items you may as just resign yourself to paying a moderate amount of extra money. The savings on the MSRP helps pay for the freight, and if I bought from a dealer that didn't discount like that I'd be paying MSRP + freight.

                      I need to go out and get some 50A breakers and an appropriate plug/receptacle so it will be ready to plug in when it arrives in a couple of weeks.

                      We may try some lost-wax silver down the road. I've seen some different websites showing jewelery where the waxes were done with CNC so that's something else to try out.

                      Unfortunately, neither of us qualify as artists. We can (usually) make something to a pattern, but mustering up some artistic flair is pretty hard for us.

                      We took a class in Chinese ink/brush painting a few years ago. I got to where I could do a bird and bamboo using those techniques, but the bird usually looked like it had too much DDT packed around the egg. Still, it was recognizably a bird of some sort.

                      cheers,
                      Michael

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