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CNC planet maps

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  • CNC planet maps

    I found this in my travels this morning.



    I almost wish I hadn't found this. Now I have another project to add to the list. The only question is what to make a model of first?

    http://www.golemdev.com/services_top...s_english.html
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

  • #2
    Sorry Evan no good.
    It's 3D and if you post any 3D files you will be told the toolpath is too clunky, file is too big, takes too long to cut and it's quicker to get a casting....................

    .
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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    • #3
      Originally posted by Evan
      I found this in my travels this morning.



      I almost wish I hadn't found this. Now I have another project to add to the list. The only question is what to make a model of first?
      Why Williams Lake of course
      I just need one more tool,just one!

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      • #4
        Evan,

        Like WS said, start with Williams Lake for a test and fine tuning. Then... The Sun, Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars........ The possibilities are endless Very slow to cut, but very very neat to see.

        Robin
        Robin

        Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

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        • #5
          depends on what the data is like and, as you probably know, which cutting
          strategy you have access to.

          I'm my limited experience doing ... lets say .. "artsy" stuff, I've always found that upping the resolution (on the cut) gave me exponential growth on cutting times with no real advantage. that is, I found it faster to 'rough it in pretty
          close' and clean them up with sandpaper, small woodworking chisels, etc.

          not to mention it gets back some of the artistic look to remove all the
          grid-like tooling marks.

          depends, again, on how fine the details is.

          also, I've always had better luck with a water-line cutting strategy than
          i did with Z depth (X/Y sweeps).

          I, too, would start with something local -- someplace near/dear to you.
          Finally, if you have the ability, I'd suggest exaggerating the Z height on
          things like maps/planets/etc -- some kind of log base to make it a bit
          more dramatic (depending on your Z travel).

          Please post pictures -- I'd bet you're working on something as I type this.

          -Tony

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          • #6
            I'm working on something alright. I'm tuning up a full user interface version of my spiral toolpath generator for CamBam. A spiral toolpath does a much nicer job of a lot of 3D models than a grid pattern. It produces a different sort of alisasing which isn't as obvious. It's almost like analog vs digital. All I need to do is a cartesian to polar conversion of height data available free from NASA.

            They have databases for Earth, Moon, Mars and Venus online and everything they have including all images and related data is automatically placed in the public domain so you can do whatever you like with it without permission.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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            • #7
              Here is a screen shot of the program. I'n not sure when it will be ready as I have a tendency to succumb to "creeping featuritis".

              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #8
                Originally posted by John Stevenson
                It's 3D and if you post any 3D files you will be told the toolpath is too clunky, file is too big, takes too long to cut and it's quicker to get a casting...
                Damn John, when you did turn into a little girl? All I said was that he could improve the toolpath by following the workpiece (like MasterCam does) instead of doing a raster scan (top-down, left-to-right).
                "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                • #9
                  A 3D terrain map would look really nice if enhanced with contour lines. You could hog it out from a laminate, with a thin light or dark ply spaced at appropriate intervals.

                  I'll bet you've thought of that.
                  Allan Ostling

                  Phoenix, Arizona

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