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Anti-friction Taper Attachment for Pacemaker

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  • Anti-friction Taper Attachment for Pacemaker

    Does anyone here own one of the "anti-friction" type of taper attachment for their pacemakers?

    My lathe sat outside for quite awhile before I owned it and I took the taper attachment apart for cleaning and de-rusting. Apart from the damage to the hardened ways that the bearings ride on, I noticed that the outer races on the bearings were broken. The ways I will surface grind, but the bearings are bothersome.

    Has anyone else had trouble with the outer race of the bearings breaking during ordinary use, or was this a product of the abuse the lathe saw while sitting outside?

    Thanks

  • #2
    Originally posted by Fasttrack
    Does anyone here own one of the "anti-friction" type of taper attachment for their pacemakers?

    Thanks
    Bloody hell whatever next. I know you can get a stent fitted but how do you get the end mills in to grind them.
    I sometimes feel the world is passing me by.

    .
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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    • #3
      Yep, the miracles of modern medicine!

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      • #4
        I can't imagine how weather would break the bearings. More likely someone "worked it hard" while cutting a taper or just plain did not lubricate them so instead of rolling they slide against the ways. Where did the machine come from? Replace the bearings shouldn't be any big deal.

        mark61

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        • #5
          LOL

          Yeah, I'm just trying to figure on what the best bearings for the job would be. There are a grand total of 20 bearings, all of which are either seized or broken so buying the best quality isn't really a feasbile option since 20 high quality bearings = $$


          Plus they are all held in with press fit pins, which will be a bugger to deal with since I don't have an arbor press...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by John Stevenson
            Bloody hell whatever next.
            It's just a ball-bearing taper attachment John, like the 10EE has. Basically an old-school version of a linear slide.
            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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            • #7
              ...who's on first?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Fasttrack
                Yeah, I'm just trying to figure on what the best bearings for the job would be.
                The 10EE's roller bearing taper attachment uses common (non ABEC-rated) 6201 bearings on the bottom, which are 12mm x 32mm x 10mm, and 5210's on the sides of the TA slide, which are 12mm x 32mm x 15.9.

                Check the dimensions of any of the bearings that aren't Fubar'ed -- I bet they're common bearings. Cheap at any bearing supply house.

                You can mount the cam follower studs without an arbor by heating the bearings to 250 F, the studs will just drop in. Note that some of the cam studs will be adjustable (eccentric) to take up the slack on the TA slide.

                Good luck!

                Robert
                "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                • #9
                  Thanks! The bearings as measured were 8mm by 24mm by 10mm but the width doesn't look too important. I've only been able to find (locally and at mcmaster, enco etc) 8mm by 22mm but there's an "ebay store" that has the size I need for 1.10 each. Thats well within my budget

                  Still makes me sad to see how this was mis-treated. The T/A doesn't look to be made by ATW - I suspect, based on quality, that it was out-sourced. It is well made but not the same as the pacemaker. It looks like the same type and construction as the one on a cinci tray-top at school.

                  The trouble now is that the nice, hardened and ground ways that the bearings roll on are all pitted from rust. I have to drive three hours to have access to a free surface grinder and I haven't found a local shop that has a decent grinding operation. I only need to shave about .003 off to remove nearly all of the pits ... maybe I could just leave it the way it is?

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                  • #10
                    Just polish it off. Pits don`t hurt any thing . Lumps and bumps DO Just clean it up with a light sanding with oil .It will work fine. Just remember you got and Old lathe which I figure had some abuse it is not nor will ever be new ,but a lot better than any Chinese machine money would buy. Just do the best you can with it and learn its little Quirks and the two of you will get along just Fine.
                    Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
                    http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
                    http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

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                    • #11
                      Thanks Lane!

                      It was a little bit discouraging at first since the rest of the lathe is in really amazing shape despite its time outside. To go from just brushing off a bit of rust and degreasing to actual substantial damage was disheartening. I don't reckon its any big deal, especially since its only on the taper attachment. I'm not too sure the T/A is an ATW product, I think it was out-sourced but thats just conjecture.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lane
                        Just polish it off. Pits don`t hurt any thing . Lumps and bumps DO Just clean it up with a light sanding with oil .It will work fine. .


                        Yup, You try to avoid pits --- but its really no biggie when you get them, but once you get them you justify them by calling them "oil retention" area's

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