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  • Rust Removal From Inside Water Jacket

    Have a Perkins P6 engine (head removed) with a badly contaminated water
    jacket in the block, does anyone know of a chemical or solution that can be
    used to help in the removal of this.
    I intend to remove the expansion plugs and use a pressure washer for the
    final attempt at cleaning.
    Thank You.

  • #2
    Besides some extensive "pull the block" and bead blast it out -- the way I would go about it is mix up a batch of that stuff thats used to clean radiators and blocks, pour it in before you remove the freeze plugs and let it soak, then car wash it out with high pressure, you might have to repeat...

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    • #3
      This is just an off the cuff suggestion, not completely thought out, but what if you used the electrolytic method I've heard about here and in other places. If you were to remove and replace the freeze plugs with two that are the rubber expansion type, fill the block with the baking soda and water solution and use the bolts in the expansion plugs as the anode and cathode (I think that's the right term), hook up a small battery charger and let electrolysis do the work.

      A second suggestion is to use "inhibited acid" available from A/C & refrigeration suppliers and used to clean the cooling systems on A/C water towers. I've used the stuff myself and it cleans rust and only rust leaving the metal so clean is will immediately rust just from moisture in the air. Inhibited acid isn't used straight but mixed with water according to the recommendations on the container. It can be pumped around until it gets "dead", removed and replace with fresh solution until all rust is removed.
      Last edited by firbikrhd1; 07-03-2008, 08:04 PM.

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      • #4
        Freeze plug?
        Gene

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        • #5
          Evap-O-Rust:

          http://www.evaporust.com/

          O'Reilly carries it, but it's a lot cheaper on Ebay.
          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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          • #6
            Take a look at Evapro-Rust could be the ticket. I've used it and it works very well.

            http://www.evaporust.com/
            Wow... where did the time go. I could of swore I was only out there for an hour.

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            • #7
              freeze plug

              Topct it is actually a core plug where the water course through the head and block mold core is located and have to be machined and core plugs installed. In Canada we hope they pop out when the block freezes before the block cracks. So in the frozen North we call them frost plugs. Never happens of course, the block always cracks first. That's why we use antifreeze all year round.Peter
              The difficult done right away. the impossible takes a little time.

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              • #8
                they actualy plug the holes that are used to get the sand cores out after the block is cast.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by brockley1
                  Topct it is actually a core plug where the water course through the head and block mold core is located and have to be machined and core plugs installed. In Canada we hope they pop out when the block freezes before the block cracks. So in the frozen North we call them frost plugs. Never happens of course, the block always cracks first. That's why we use antifreeze all year round.Peter
                  And that is why they are not "freeze plugs".
                  Gene

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                  • #10
                    Freeze Plug

                    'scuze me y'all, I'm jus' wunna thoz dumb suthern boys. We always called 'em freeze plugs down my way, even if that aern't the proper name. I guess it's sort of a local thang....

                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freeze_plug

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                    • #11
                      I know why their there but I also call them freeze-plugs,
                      I actually got a "superwrench" award/trophy sitting here at home because of one,
                      The sweedish fella I used to work for (still a dear ole friend) was really cool and when someone who worked for him did something out of the ordinary yet positive he would get them a trophy and there would be a saying under it -- the saying under this one was just a card that had some french words that I didnt know what they meant -- I asked him and he said they meant "talent will out"

                      This particular trophy is a mechanical man/figure made of nuts and bolts and springs and he's turning a wrench,

                      Now for the relevance of the topic

                      When I was just 18 I moved out here and got a job working for this guy at his foreign car repair shop, I was doing my thing and he was working on an old toyota -- a corolla - corona or cresenda or something like that, anyhoo, he went to a salvage yard and got an engine to replace the one in the car because it shelled out a rod bearing and blew its guts ----- he totally got the salvage engine in and fired it up and it would not pump up oil pressure, he had checked the oil and it was fine, he planned on running it - warming up the old oil and then dumping it, but what he found after it wouldnt pump up was that there was a load of coolant in the bottom of the pan, UGGGHHH he said -- the engines junk -- all that work to put it in,, he stated that the block must be cracked, I immediately asked if there were any "freeze plugs" he stated nowhere to be seen, I went and looked at the engine and he was right -- nowhere external, I then see a side panel lifter cover (I think actually two of them side by side) I told him I thought they would be worth removing, he said NO very firmly and said they are a very picky salvage yard - if we screw up a gasket and its obvious they might not take it back as its shaky ground to begin with, plus he stated that all there is under there is lifters and pushrods (like i said -- early toyota) I seen how hard he worked putting the engine in, I could not just "let it go" (see fella's -- Iv always been a stubborn ass)
                      So I let him cool down and asked him if I could please remove it and I would take my time with a razor and not destroy anything --- NO!!
                      it was all bad timing as he was already pissed with what went down, Still -- I could not not think about it and it was driving me crazy, --- it was only two bolts, then I remember him going to the house (20 ft. away) to talk on the phone with the salvage people --- now was my chance, I grabbed a ratchet and a socket --- I popped the first cover off -- as I removed it something fell onto the cement under the car --- and then I see the vacancy hole where the plug was --- BINGO I got it, I had enough time to retrieve the plug and when Captian Crunch (he got that nickname for dropping a volvo trans on his pinkie) was walking back from the house to the shop I flipped him the plug (like a coke bottle top) He caught it, looked at it and there wasnt an expression --------- he immediately left the shop in a furry (burned rubber in somebodys saab) I thought I was in really big trouble, I not only disobeyed a direct order, i basically disobeyed three of them, then he shows up fifteen minutes later with my superwrench award, he's all smiles and gives me a big hug -- then thanks me for not listening to him! we press the old plug back in with some sealant ------ he changes the oil we get pressure and the car burns a little oil but other than that it goes down the road....
                      Moral of story; To each there own, but I call em a freeze plug

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by topct
                        Freeze plug?
                        Welsh Plug
                        Precision takes time.

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                        • #13
                          Known as a frost and a welch plug down this way.
                          If it's my motor, it gets the brass version... and don't forget the bugger behind the flywheel.

                          addition: http://www.britishcarweek.org/welch_plug.html
                          Last edited by speedy; 07-04-2008, 01:24 AM.
                          Ken.

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                          • #14
                            I have a set for a 22RE sitting in of all places the built in spice cabinet that I never use in the kitchen --- I just went and checked what the plastic covered cardboard pack says and its none of what anybody says - but it has to do more with freezing than any other term other than "freeze plug" --- the pack is labeled "expansion plugs" I dont believe their talking in expansion as in the plug itself as it actually physically goes through a compression whilst pushing it into the block

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                            • #15
                              They would be the cursed shallow dished type?
                              Ken.

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