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OT..An amazing website!(not what you think..lol!)

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  • OT..An amazing website!(not what you think..lol!)

    This guy is unreal! Sorta my new hero actually!
    http://www.kingofobsolete.ca/
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

  • #2
    Wow! I don't know what to say,is it madness or obsession or both?A collection of IH dozer iron that big he must have the patience of a saint.

    Got a bud with a TD14 and TD24 and a TD25,I thought that was a collection,but this guy takes the cake
    I just need one more tool,just one!

    Comment


    • #3
      WS I've got a TD14, 18 and an adams grader with 14 power, missed out on a TD25B for $4K 2 years ago.......that cheap $$$ for 85,000 lbs that will make a D8H suck sloughwater............LOL

      High scrap prices are making all brands of this old iron disappear now....frown
      Opportunity knocks once, temptation leans on the doorbell.....

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by hardtail
        WS I've got a TD14, 18 and an adams grader with 14 power, missed out on a TD25B for $4K 2 years ago.......that cheap $$$ for 85,000 lbs that will make a D8H suck sloughwater............LOL

        High scrap prices are making all brands of this old iron disappear now....frown
        Yup 85k alright,buddys 25 has 40" pads on it,but spit on the ground in front of it and she goes down like the Titanic

        He also has a 18' double cutter(double sided snowplow,but made to winrow trees)Prolly weighs 15 ton by itself.
        I just need one more tool,just one!

        Comment


        • #5
          Wow

          Just goes to show what can be accomplished when one is in possession of heavy equipment and internal head injuries.

          Comment


          • #6
            LOL! I liked this guy right from the getgo.. I spent quite a few years running old cats in the bush as a young fella. That's actually where I first got the welding bug. Gawd.. in the winter when it got really cold.. you'd break a lot of stuff on them old girls. Not that many years of torture causing millions of stress cracks would have anything to do with that.
            Did a lot of welding on that ol' stuff. Dig out the open can of 7018 that was always in the back of the truck and go to it. Rod oven??? What's that?
            Yep.. me and KoO could be buds I figure.
            LOL! Reminds me of my first cat drivin job..The boss asks if any of us have ever had experience on a cat (A lil' D2). I was pretty brave about taking on anything back then so I piped up"Oh ya.. I can run that thing.." (Didn't have a damm clue)
            I jump on it...it was already running. Start trying to make it move. Start pulling levers and pushing pedals when all of a sudden it takes off. We were "supposed" to be backfilling a bridge approach with it.
            I drop the blade.. take on WAYYY too much dirt for the lil' cat...raise the blade...then try to lower it.. you know what happened next... almost like riding a bronc... front end raising and dropping..
            Meanwhile the almost full approach to the bridge was coming up fast... I'm ready to push the dirt in the remaining hole and back up.. but for one thing.. I couldn't remember where the clutch was. I thought it was one of the foot pedals...but it was the handlever. I'm pushing on pedals...jerkin on levers..tryin to stop the cat...no luck...over the approach and "Sploosh" into the creek..dead motor hissing from the cold water on hot metal..me..floating away..
            I was pretty darn popular with the boss. Got demoted immediately.
            LOL! A month later I talked him into letting me try the ol' cable dozer.. D-8.
            He never told me you don't turn them big ol' wore out cats around real sharp.. My first turn.. walked the damm cat right out of it's tracks.
            I got seriously laid off right about then
            Russ
            I have tools I don't even know I own...

            Comment


            • #7
              See torker I knew you were 2 peas in a pod........you guys on cats are magnets to water.......LOL You guys could meet in the middle so to speak at my place (OK KOO will complain that somewhere in SK is the middle) then you could have a few pops and I would be the voice of reason.......likely crowbar hotel dead ahead........LOL Oh yeah don't tell your wife about all his ex's........

              WS 40" pads and an 18' dozer sounds like that thing wants to walk on water.....well as much as 40 ton can........big blade usually for light material, snow, wood chips, coal........
              Last edited by hardtail; 07-22-2008, 12:13 AM.
              Opportunity knocks once, temptation leans on the doorbell.....

              Comment


              • #8
                We don't see the little machines much around here. One of the things that makes this a tolerable small town to live near is the high density of heavy equipment dealers and related support services. With logging and mining being primary industries I have few problems find locally available machining and welding consumables.

                Here is some pretty standard work around here. This entire province is rock. My well log says the first bit is hard clay and then it's grey rock, black rock, red rock, dark rock, light rock followed by more rock for 350 feet down.. Building anything usually means blasting.

                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                • #9
                  Check out "KING'S BAR STARTER" Insane people make me feel more comfortable about myself Cant believe he didnt snap a flywheel tooth or pinon drive gear -- note the "lever" he hooked up to it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Evan I believe the Alcan project/ Kitimat dam was the largest earthmoving public/private project to date in the 50's? TD24's and cans were thick on that job, bound to be some still around even though those didn't turn out to be a very reliable machine for IH. A fellow has just restored one that had a triple drum yarder winch on it, low hrs and it came off that project.
                    Opportunity knocks once, temptation leans on the doorbell.....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I find it interesting that with the amount of rock that has to be moved to do anything here we are still well behind on one particular technology that is probably one of the most important contributors to reliability of components that make ground contact.

                      The company my wife manages imported a special welder from Germany some years ago that is used to apply hardened studs to surfaces that would normally be treated with hard facing rod here. The tungsten carbide studs have a much better lifetime and do a much better job of protecting rock contact surfaces than hard facing does. I'm not trying to promote this product or make a sale here but it strikes me as odd that this technology is common as, umm, dirt in other parts of the planet but not here. Her company hasn't been able to sell a unit yet even though there is a huge user base outside of North America that swears by it.

                      The result looks like this:



                      The stud treatment is more costly up front but easily pays back the investment in reduced maintenance and doesn't even require a trained weldor to apply. The machine is automatic and just about anybody can run it.

                      I would appreciate any comments that might help her company sell this product or at least explain why they haven't been able to convince anyone to use it. It isn't cheap but also isn't much more expensive than a regular heavy duty regular welder. They thought and I think it would be a no-brainer since the stud treatment will outlast hard facing by many times.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Is the oil sands using it, that looks familiar on the shovels??
                        Opportunity knocks once, temptation leans on the doorbell.....

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I don't know but once you get into Alberta most of the rock problems go away. The oil sands are all in sedimentary formations so there isn't any hard rock to deal with other than glacial sporadics.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Evan.. is that sort of a big stud welder gun that they install those with?
                            I actually work with a lot of rock equipment. Some of these guys are a funny breed.
                            One guy.. i rebuilt his buckets for years. He refused to even hardface anything...thinking that he spent all the money on T425 so that should be good enough.
                            Then one day he weakened...sorta...he bought a bunch of cans of hardface rod from a yard sale or something and had me "try" to use it. It was awful stuff... never could get it to run right. Of course it didn't last so he was sceptical about hardfacing.
                            I finally had to use some of my own rod..for free.. to get him to see the light. Now he gets it... he's using hardface like he should have been all along.
                            These studs.. that's prolly how to sell them...instal them for free to some big outfit for actaul testing.
                            I'm actually interested in those. Does Janet have any info she can send me?
                            Russ
                            I have tools I don't even know I own...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Evan
                              I don't know but once you get into Alberta most of the rock problems go away. The oil sands are all in sedimentary formations so there isn't any hard rock to deal with other than glacial sporadics.
                              The sand in the bitumen is awfully abrasive, production rarely ceases........
                              Opportunity knocks once, temptation leans on the doorbell.....

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