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mmade a barrel band for my crosman 2240 today

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  • mmade a barrel band for my crosman 2240 today

    i needed to get rid of the original i hate pot metal and pastic any how i used some brass flat bar i had. here are some pics and a short video of the boaring head in action on my Ct129 mill, i borrowed this boring head from my buddy and it works great now i gota get me one of these no more expensive drill bits that are a pain in the neck...the shaping of the band was all done on my grinder by hand and finished finish was done on my belt sander ...








  • #2
    Nice job on the barrel band.

    When watching the video the first thing that came to mind is that a larger hand wheel for your down feed would help out a lot. It would give you a smoother even feed. You could use the top off of one of those new pistons that you have.

    Bore a hole in the center that is a nice fit over your existing knob and use a set screw to hold it on. (just like the field target fellows do on their scopes) Put a crank handle on it and you're all set.
    To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

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    • #3
      When useing a boreing head I rarely go over 300 RPM or so and that is on a full size mill.

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      • #4
        It is unsafe to grind non ferrous metals. The wheel will load up and get out of balance and blow up!

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        • #5
          i like the idea george ill start on the piston mod tomorow and take some pics when its all set up...


          any how these are the last 2 for now in brass till i get more brass flat bar these are also a thinner profile as well then the first one i made not bad for under 6 hours of work for the day for 3 of these ,, i suspect the SS ones are going to take alot longer to make then the brass ones did..



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          • #6
            Instead of grinding the taper, why not mill the angle, and turn the radius on the ends with a radius turning fixture (Marv Klotz and the prolific Japanese guy have posted great examples...)
            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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            • #7
              ii dont have a turnning fixture and iam pretty broke right now so i do the best i can with the stuff i have for now , iam saving up towards my own boring head as well as the indexing table and tail stock kit and a few other toys as well ,, conrsidering iam hand grinding this things out i think i do pretty darn good at it.. but yes i would like my life made much eaiser but like all good things i have i to waite till i can afford them ..

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              • #8
                Originally posted by airsmith282
                ii dont have a turnning fixture and iam pretty broke right now so i do the best i can with the stuff i have for now
                It's dirt simple: you can cobble one together with stuff in your junkbox in less than 15 minutes: basically just a pin that's held in a vise. You stick the piece you're rounding onto the pin, and rotate it around the spinning endmill.

                This is Marv's more involved version, where he mounted the pin on a sub-plate, and added stops:




                A rounding over fixture for small parts
                "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                • #9
                  ill have to make one one of thoes set ups i have some aluim sheet thats abotu 1/4 thick might be thicker any chahce that would be sturdy enough to do the trick

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                  • #10
                    I found Ishamura's link: just a pin in a hole in a piece of scrap. He had a video showing this being done, but I can't find it:

                    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                    • #11
                      cool ill have to set someting up when i start on my ss barrel bands tomororw might just save me grinder wheels some hell

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                      • #12
                        Brass is hard to beat

                        Nice job airsmith.

                        If you are careful you can avoid the boring head by making a solid short boring bar with a HSS tool in it and putting it in your collet - or a drill chuck if needs be. Just adjust cutting tool projection out of the boring bar.

                        I'd use the three handles on the drill instead of the fine feed. Just grip the "top" handle with your hand and "lock" the next one down to your elbow and you will have very good control - it might surprise you just how much control you have. I use it on my mill/drills (2) and my pedestal grinder when I need control of the "drilling" and "break-through/out" (as in thin sheets).

                        I'd stick with brass in preference to stainless steel as brass is very easy to work with.

                        You can use either hack-saw (hand) or band-saw (vertical) cut cut brass very easily, quickly and accurately.

                        Brass can be ground using a silicon carbide ("green") wheel. Even if you use a common old emery wheel or an aluminium oxide ("white") - (preferable over emery) you will get a good result.

                        The wheels will NOT "blow up" - but they will need "dressing" as they "clog up". No real need for a diamond dresser either. You can use a "star wheel" or a bit of old emery wheel - or a "dressing stick" (square - looks like "emery") and are very cheap.

                        If you have a belt sander, that is even better.

                        Brass works very well with HSS (or at a "pinch" carbon steel/"Jobber") hole saws which are not expensive and come with a 1/4" pilot drill - a lot better and cheaper than large HSS morse taper shank drills.

                        I have the same lathe as you and I'd have probably drilled and bored that larger hole either in a 4-jaw chuck - or if there were several to do - I'd make a simple location fixture for it for use on a face-plate.

                        Brass looks really good and is easy to work.

                        If I recall your (very nice) mill (Busy Bee?) you have a good down feed for your milling head on the vertical dove-tail slide as well - why not use or try it out? It is only a matter of getting the gib/s set "nice and snug".

                        The advice about keeping the speed down when using a boring head is very sound as the head gets out of balance and "throws" off very easily. You can feel it easily if you put your hand on the milling head. The slide/way lock should be set after re-adjusting the boring head. The gib should be "snug" to "firm".

                        I fully support lazlo's suggestion about the radius mill/filling fixtures as well as they are very versatile and useful. But a word of caution - DON'T "climb mill" as it may "get away from you" - normal milling is just fine.

                        You have every reason to be very pleased with yourself and that job you turned out - I sure would be.

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                        • #13
                          thanks oldtiffie for the comments and sudjestions and thank you all as well auctualy ,, ill have some things to do over the next few days and ill cut back the speed as well,i hadnt noticed any vibration at all form the 450 rpm it was going but ill try a lower speed either way and i know on the stianless steel ones i really gota cut the speed back for sure , iam leaning lots thats for sure,, any milling i have been doing before i got my mill was all done on my lathe with a home made rig , i love having a really accurate machine alot better as well, i got some bugs i never wokred out of the rig for my lathe so now i can take some time and fo thart for any kind of angle slot cutting i want to do i prefer it on the lathe attachment as i can turn my vice around on the fly on it ill have to save for a swivel vice for my mill eventually.. that out i supposed i can take the rig form my lathe i built and use parts of it wow ideas just come to my head now why buy what i can modiify.. any how thanks again i really love munching metal.. i got more parts to make for my airgun plus i got more of these barrel bands to do as well.

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                          • #14
                            Great Job! I hate the Crosman bands too! Need to make some more myself.
                            Largest resource on the web for Taig lathes and milling machines, www.cartertools.com

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by lazlo
                              I found Ishamura's link: just a pin in a hole in a piece of scrap. He had a video showing this being done, but I can't find it:
                              Here ya go: http://homepage3.nifty.com/amigos/knurl2/round2.wmv

                              Peter

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