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  • Todays project

    I lurk a lot here as I usually find answers to my questions by reading the posts from those of you more experienced. Now and then I'll post an experience or try to answer something I think I know about.

    Today I was doing a woodworking project. Restoring an old wood chair we rescued. One of the rails had both the dowels broken off during dis-assembly. It would have been difficult to drill out a 9/16" dowel on my drill press as it would be hard to clamp securely. I sawed off the dowels stubs flush with the rail. I decided to build a table for my SB9 lathe and use the carriage to hold the work. I used a base of 3/4" plywood with a square piece of pine screwed to the base and sized to put the vertical center of the work on the lathe center line. Then a piece of wood in the back to give a corner into which to clamp the work.



    I used a center drill in my chuck to start the hole on center. Used the cross feed to align the Y axis on center.



    Then I switched to a 9/16" spade drill bit. The hole from the center drill helped keep things on center. I used the middle speed pully low range. A moderate speed for a spade bit. The bit is fairly long but ran quite true (to my surprise). I went in about 3/4".





    This was an interesting way to do this job. It was very stable and sturdy. No vibrations beyond what you would expect from a spade bit. I had a great deal of depth control using the carriage. The fixture was held to the cross feed with two 5/16-18 bolts (well, one allen head cap screw and one bolt). Hope this was an interesting post. Just trying to give back a little.
    Bill
    San Diego, CA

  • #2
    Drilling.

    Nice job Bill. Good lateral thinking too.

    There was a post here some time ago where someone did a somewhat similar thing by making and putting a drill/MT holder on the cross-slide (and with the job in the head-stock chuck).

    Someone else posted a similar arrangement by mounting the drill/MT in a holder for his quick-change tool-post as well. It too worked well.

    It made for very good drilling under better control and depth that was available by using the tail-stock for the drill. The apron hand-wheel was used for insertion and withdrawal and the power feed could be used for the actual drilling.

    Three really good variations of the same or similar principles.

    If you have anything of interest to anybody - please post it.

    Those pics were excellent.

    If anyone has the links to the two other I mentioned, could they please post them here - on this thread.

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    • #3
      Bill...always nice to see machines getting put to good use...
      I'm wondering tho...don't you get a bit nervous having that lion looking in the door as you work
      Russ
      I have tools I don't even know I own...

      Comment


      • #4
        Oldtiffie,
        Thanks. I had been putting off trying to repair that rail till it dawned on me to use the lathe. It worked better than I expected. The pictures were taken with a little Fuji 2600 point and shoot. I have had very good results with that camera.

        Russ,
        Nah, the lion doesn't bother me. He's pretty slow (concrete). Sometimes thought the light from the afternoon sun gets pretty oppressive coming in that door. Gotta let my better half have her decorations. She cleans up after me in the shop after all.
        Bill
        San Diego, CA

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        • #5
          I would have just chucked the piece up in my four jaw chuck and drilled it with the spade bit mounted in a drill chuck mount in the tail stock. No need to build a special fixture, or is there some thing I am missing? Gary P. Hansen
          In memory of Marine Engineer Paul Miller who gave his life for his country 7-19-2010 Helmand Province, Afghanistan. Freedom is not free, it is paid for with blood.

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          • #6
            The piece in question is clearly larger than the spindle bore, otherwise the four jaw would work.

            Joe

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            • #7
              Gary,
              Optics Curmudgeon is correct. The rail in question would not have fit into my spindle bore which is only 0.75". I do have a steady rest but would have had to build a cats paw of some sort to hold the square rail. The round tennon was gone on both ends of the workpiece. The rail is about 11 inches long and 3/4 inches square.
              Bill
              San Diego, CA

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              • #8
                "The rail is about 11 inches long and 3/4 inches square."


                All you need to do was draw a X from corner to corner on the tail stock end of the rail. Center the head stock end in the chuck and then advance the point of the spade bit into the center of the wood a 1/8" or so with the tail stock before starting the lathe. No real trick to it. Gary P. Hansen
                In memory of Marine Engineer Paul Miller who gave his life for his country 7-19-2010 Helmand Province, Afghanistan. Freedom is not free, it is paid for with blood.

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                • #9
                  Oh, Let me add, I have owned a South Bend 9N for close to 30 years and have done just about every thing you can do with one and a few things you would not think possible. Gary P. Hansen
                  In memory of Marine Engineer Paul Miller who gave his life for his country 7-19-2010 Helmand Province, Afghanistan. Freedom is not free, it is paid for with blood.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Nice job! Just make sure you get the wood dust cleaned up quickly. Mixed with some way oil and it turns into cement! I found some wood bits under my motor the other day from a tap holder I made out of wood a year or so ago. It was rock hard and stuck like epoxy to the metal!

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                    • #11
                      wood dust

                      Oh yes. I clean up when done. Wood dust can be abrasive too. My shop is combination wood and metal work so I keep the machines covered when not in use.
                      Bill
                      San Diego, CA

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