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Rotary table oil Recommendations?

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  • Rotary table oil Recommendations?

    Just got a rotary table off Fleabay
    no manual, and nothing on the manufacturers website. Need an oil for it.

    In the interim it has my Ggeneral purpose straight mineral ISO 100. btw the table is a Fritz Werner 2.940 250mm (10"). Many thanks in advance

    Derek

  • #2
    If it has bronze gears a mineral gear lube is needed, as for weight you are probably good where you are.

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    • #3
      Enco recomends straight 30wt spindle oil for their rotary tables.

      Comment


      • #4
        I would second the caution about gear lubes in anything with yellow metals (bronze, brass) bushings. Its common for gear lubes to contain sulphur as an EP (Extreme Pressure) lubricant for use in high-shear applications, and it will attack yellow metals.

        What exactly is a "mineral oil" used in the context above? I would think that petroleum products would be classed as a "mineral oil" would they not? I have always sort of wondered about this so here is a chance for me to learn what the term means.

        I think its not the type of base oil that is at issue, but the additives (as mentioned above) that show up in "gear lubricants"??

        Paul
        Paul Carpenter
        Mapleton, IL

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        • #5
          Originally posted by pcarpenter
          I would second the caution about gear lubes in anything with yellow metals (bronze, brass) bushings. Its common for gear lubes to contain sulphur as an EP (Extreme Pressure) lubricant for use in high-shear applications, and it will attack yellow metals.

          What exactly is a "mineral oil" used in the context above? I would think that petroleum products would be classed as a "mineral oil" would they not? I have always sort of wondered about this so here is a chance for me to learn what the term means.

          I think its not the type of base oil that is at issue, but the additives (as mentioned above) that show up in "gear lubricants"??

          Paul
          The oil is Castrol Magna 100 I quote from the Castrol datasheet

          Castrol Magna lubricating oils are a range of highly refined straight mineral
          oils primarily intended for the lubrication of bearings, spindles and, using the
          heavier viscosity grades, moderately loaded gearboxes.

          Castrol Magna lubricating oils are available in a range of viscosities from 320
          cSt for gear lubrication down to 2 cSt for use on fine clearance high speed
          spindles.

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          • #6
            The best lube I've found for rotary tables is NGLI 00, "semi-liquid" grease. It doesn't run out when you tilt the rotab, or turn it on it's side.

            I would second the caution about gear lubes in anything with yellow metals (bronze, brass) bushings. Its common for gear lubes to contain sulphur as an EP (Extreme Pressure) lubricant for use in high-shear applications, and it will attack yellow metals.
            JC Hannum pointed out last time that modern EP lubes don't use sulphur as the EP additive anymore. The DTE EP hydraulic oils, for example, are safe for red metals.
            Last edited by lazlo; 09-18-2008, 03:42 PM.
            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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            • #7
              My point was that I don't think that the term "mineral oil" by itself mandates that its safe as I thought that petroleum oils *are* considered mineral oils and that some *gear lubricants* do contain sulphur. I suppose in the since that hydraulic or circulating oils may be considered gear lubricants in the non-specific sense, I see the point that some do not contain it.

              However, the common goop you put in rear axles and manual transmissions in automotive applications is also (and perhaps more commonly) considered "gear lubricant" by the average Joe and I believe some of them *do* still contain sulphur. I haven't bought any recently that were non-synthetic, but I still have a maybe 8 year old bottle of the stuff that still smells of it. Sulphur is the stuff that makes them stink. I will have to see if I can get myself thrown out the next time I go to Wal-mart by sniffing bottle of gear oil I could make up my eyes all red and slur my speech when the rent-a-cop shows up

              http://www.stdrivers.co.uk/forum/sho....php?tid/9550/
              Paul Carpenter
              Mapleton, IL

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by pcarpenter
                My point was that I don't think that the term "mineral oil" by itself mandates that its safe as I thought that petroleum oils *are* considered mineral oils and that some *gear lubricants* do contain sulphur. I suppose in the since that hydraulic or circulating oils may be considered gear lubricants in the non-specific sense, I see the point that some do not contain it.

                However, the common goop you put in rear axles and manual transmissions in automotive applications is also (and perhaps more commonly) considered "gear lubricant" by the average Joe and I believe some of them *do* still contain sulphur. I haven't bought any recently that were non-synthetic, but I still have a maybe 8 year old bottle of the stuff that still smells of it. Sulphur is the stuff that makes them stink. I will have to see if I can get myself thrown out the next time I go to Wal-mart by sniffing bottle of gear oil I could make up my eyes all red and slur my speech when the rent-a-cop shows up

                http://www.stdrivers.co.uk/forum/sho....php?tid/9550/
                FWIW Castrol Magna 100 is almost odour free...

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                • #9
                  duplicATE POst
                  Last edited by derekm; 09-18-2008, 06:35 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Derek-- I now see why you keep clarifying about the Castrol product after each time I post. I was not clear that I was really responding to Macona's post indicating that if yellow metals are present, you need a mineral oil. What I was driving at was that theoretically, "mineral oil" is not descriptive enough to insure that a product does not contain *sulphur* which is the thing that is typically worrysome with bronze bearings. The type of oil is one thing...the additives that are in it is another.

                    It would sound like the Castrol product you are looking at should be fine if the "sniff test" is adequate, but its also possible that they have data sheets on thier web site as some other oil companies do that would give a clue about the possible addition of sulphur as an EP additive.

                    You can always look at your bronze worm or bearing after a bit of exposure and see if it was darkened by the oil. If so, drain, flush, and fill with something else. I would think that short term exposure would be enough to change the color without doing real damage. I have seen bronze really stained almost black by the stuff.

                    Paul
                    Paul Carpenter
                    Mapleton, IL

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                    • #11
                      Am I missing something here? A rotary table? A hand crank? If mine ever got dry enough to squeak and I spit in it it would last a thousand years.

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