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  • Clausing "Student Lathe"

    I have had a limited exposure to a lot of different lathes, but I am going to guess that a 'student lathe" is of a lighter duty or so it may seem by reading these threads. In fact, I've never heard of one before reading this forum. Could someone enlighten me if this is incorrect. Are there any more differences between a "production" or "industiral" lathe or am I guessing correct. I am inquiring as I own a 6918 Clausing that was indeed purchased from a trade school. Thanks.

  • #2
    The "Student" was a model of Clausing lathe. Actually a Colchester.

    http://www.lathes.co.uk/colchester/page2.html

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    • #3
      Originally posted by thebigron
      I have had a limited exposure to a lot of different lathes, but I am going to guess that a 'student lathe" is of a lighter duty or so it may seem by reading these threads. In fact, I've never heard of one before reading this forum. Could someone enlighten me if this is incorrect. Are there any more differences between a "production" or "industiral" lathe or am I guessing correct. I am inquiring as I own a 6918 Clausing that was indeed purchased from a trade school. Thanks.
      The Student designation was just a reflection of the size and the major target market at the time in education. It was designed when training shops etc were working flat out and in ours, the 60 plus Colchester Student lathes were worked 5 1/2 days a week, 10 hours a day. Operated by students who had no idea what they were doing initially. The machines were accurate, robust and very reliable with a working life of at least 30 years. Most of the problems we had were through miss-handling, wear was rarely a major issue. If you can get a good one they make a first class Home Shop Machine.

      The modern concept of "cheap training" lathes which stand unused for 90% of their time was not the way things were done. At the time I first used one (1960s) it was recognised that students would be hard on the machines (not always intentionally) and they were built to absorb the knocks which they did with ease. These were not the cheap import lathes of their day but very well made robust machines many of which have done stirling work both training and in small production shops for 40 plus years. They are simpler in concept (smaller speed and threadcutting range etc) than toolroom or production lathes of their time but very capable as a general "jack of all trades" machine. Lightweight is a relative term but not one I would apply to the Colcheter Student.

      Regards

      Keith

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      • #4
        the Colchester Students I have seen are simpler, less expensive versions of the same timeframes 13" Colchester Master lathes. The q.c. gearbox has less thread settings is one thing I remember. They are good lathes. I seem to remember Colchester Dominion model lathes being very similar.

        The smartest thing Clausing ever did was importing Colchesters, they are a better quality lathe than the ones Clausing themselves made.

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        • #5
          You guys must have some crap machine makers over there if you think an old roundhead Student is a great lathe.They were total rubbish.Headstocks were soft and noisy,feed gears soft and wore quickly and the feed engaging mechanism in the apron just wore away.Probably one of the worst British built lathes of the second part of the twentieth century.Ok for a young person`s first introduction to turning but nothing else.

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          • #6
            Geeze, I bought Emco V-13's for my "student lathes", and they have been bombproof for 15 years now. Of course i am crazy about the maintenance.....
            CCBW, MAH

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Mark McGrath
              if you think an old roundhead Student is a great lathe.They were total rubbish.Headstocks were soft and noisy,feed gears soft and wore quickly and the feed engaging mechanism in the apron just wore away.Probably one of the worst British built lathes of the second part of the twentieth century.

              I paid a grand for mine

              not a roundhead though, Master Mk2, two speed 3 horse motor,
              big enough for me, light enough to go on a trailer,

              Anyone got a mint Smart and Brown 1024 for sale?
              I no longer own tools I had.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Mark McGrath
                You guys must have some crap machine makers over there if you think an old roundhead Student is a great lathe.They were total rubbish.Headstocks were soft and noisy,feed gears soft and wore quickly and the feed engaging mechanism in the apron just wore away.Probably one of the worst British built lathes of the second part of the twentieth century.Ok for a young person`s first introduction to turning but nothing else.

                Hmm, strange,

                my one runs like a swiss watch, all its features still function and cuts good threads etc.

                Second to my bridgeport, it my favourite machine.

                Dave
                If it does'nt fit, hit it.
                https://ddmetalproducts.co.uk
                http://www.davekearley.co.uk

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mark McGrath
                  They were total rubbish.and the feed engaging mechanism in the apron just wore away.Probably one of the worst British built lathes of the second part of the twentieth century
                  Are you refering to the screwcutting half nut? My MK2 was half worn out but then it was probably the original issue item and had survived for 35 years. Lubrication helps. Then I came upon 2 new buggers and some other spares.
                  Last edited by speedy; 09-22-2008, 08:05 AM.
                  Ken.

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                  • #10
                    Quote "my one runs like a swiss watch,"

                    There has never been a Colchester made that runs like a Swiss watch.
                    Have you run many other machines in order to have a comparison?

                    The feed arrangment used to consist of a cast iron cradle which pivoted on the feed shaft.The holes in it would wear which meant that the worm gear was not fully engaged when you used the feed thus resulting in the gears wearing away.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mark McGrath
                      Quote "my one runs like a swiss watch,"

                      There has never been a Colchester made that runs like a Swiss watch.
                      Have you run many other machines in order to have a comparison?

                      The feed arrangment used to consist of a cast iron cradle which pivoted on the feed shaft.The holes in it would wear which meant that the worm gear was not fully engaged when you used the feed thus resulting in the gears wearing away.
                      I own a boxford VSL and have used a Colchester Master, I guess my student has not seen much abuse as the cradle is good and firm. I suppose if caught early it could be bushed instead of letting it wreck the gears?

                      Ok maybe not a swiss watch, but it is smooth and relatively quiet for its age.

                      I use it for the heavy stuff and do the fine work on the Boxford.

                      The price was great as i paid bugger all for the student, i had a choice of three, i guess i got lucky!

                      Dave
                      If it does'nt fit, hit it.
                      https://ddmetalproducts.co.uk
                      http://www.davekearley.co.uk

                      Comment

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