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  • Anvil "thingy"

    Hi

    We have this anvil like device at work. It is basically a (very) lightweight "anvil" shaped device. The school has done jewelry and metal embossing courses in the past so perhaps it was used for these courses.

    The "T" shaped item is made from 2" square bar, approx 14" long across the top and the stem is approx 12" high. (Perhaps it is a casting but without closer inspection, looks to be made from large square bar stock).

    Something like this but scaled up a little...



    The stem of the tee is placed into a square hole in the workbench, the top of the tee is similar to an anvil. It has a flat section on one leg of the tee, tapered from the middle to approx 3/4" thick at the end. This is simple enough to mill.

    The other leg of the tee is like the horn end of an anvil. Turning a taper to produce a cone shape is not a problem, my quandry is how do I turn the cone so that the tip of the cone is flush with the top of the tee. That is, if you look at the device from the side, the top of the anvil is flat across the top, one side of the "cone" or horn is in line with the top surface of the anvil.

    How do I turn such a cone?

    kind regards

    Peter
    Kind regards

    Peter

  • #2
    Let me get this straight

    You want to make one of these "anvil thingy" am I correct?

    If you have a CNC mill it isn't a problem to turn a cone. Use a wheel cutter and just go around it.

    If you have to do it in a lathe... now there is some fun . You have a couple of choices as I see it. You could use a 4 jaw chuck and a center. You will have to calculate where the center drill goes (I would leave enough material for a false center) and dial the back side straight using the adjustment of the 4 jaw.

    Or, do the same thing with centers on both ends. Either way remember to drill the centers inline with the turning angle and not the center of the raw stock.

    Or if you really want to be lazy turn the cone straight and first then mill the rest of the part to what you want it too look like. But that is not a challenge.

    If I had to hazard a guess, I would say it is a forging. Not sure a casting would be strong enough... well maybe....

    Comment


    • #3
      Peter, sounds like what you have is a sheet metal forming "stake".

      Unless you want to machine and weld, you are out of luck.
      They are forged.
      You could also search "pritchel" and "hardie" or "hardy"
      These fit in those odd square holes you see in some anvils.

      Rgds,
      Lin
      Just got my head together
      now my body's falling apart

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by huntinguy
        You want to make one of these "anvil thingy" am I correct?
        Yes.

        If you have a CNC mill it isn't a problem to turn a cone. Use a wheel cutter and just go around it.
        No CNC

        If you have to do it in a lathe... now there is some fun .
        Yes, hence my question

        You have a couple of choices as I see it. You could use a 4 jaw chuck and a center. You will have to calculate where the center drill goes (I would leave enough material for a false center) and dial the back side straight using the adjustment of the 4 jaw.
        Two problems with the lathe option, the end held in the 4 jaw would be turning subtaitially off center, as the offset would have to be the full 2" thickness of the material so that the horn's center line would be flush with the top of the material. The second problem is where to put the center, as it too needs to be inline with what will be the top of the device. Basically the center hole has to be where the point of the horn is to be.

        The top of he device would become one "side" of the horn, the compound slide angle creates the other "side"

        It is impractical and a little unwieldy, I think, to do this in the lathe.

        I think I'll go with the machine and weld option as Swarf&Sparks suggested.

        Thanks for the info....

        Kind regards

        Peter
        Kind regards

        Peter

        Comment


        • #5
          Turn it on a lathe. Make the base oversize. Then cut the square base at an angle

          Comment


          • #6
            Turn it on an angle plate on a faceplate in the lathe?

            David
            Montezuma, IA
            David Kaiser
            “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
            ― Robert A. Heinlein

            Comment


            • #7
              Start out with the square bar centered in the 4-jaw chuck, and turn the bar so it's round for the entire length of the right end. This is necessary to get the square shape you see in the center when you look at the anvil from the side. Make the cylinder a little longer than needed for the finished part.

              Now tack two wedge-shaped pieces to the top and bottom of the square to match the offset angle of the cone you want to turn. Chuck it in the 4-jaw so a center drill in the tailstock will touch the outer edge of the end of the cylinder you turned earlier. Drill a shallow hole for the live center, then turn the cone. Back the tailstock away for the final cuts on the end of the cone.

              The top of the cone should be a very narrow untouched portion of the cylinder, so it's going to be all interrupted cutting.

              Roger
              Last edited by winchman; 09-22-2008, 01:17 PM.
              Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

              Comment


              • #8
                Or...........
                you could just fork over the $12.97 and buy one.
                http://www.widgetsupply.com/page/WS/...nvil/SAA2-51RJ
                I know it ain't as much fun but, you sure are not going to build one this cheap................
                "Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not."~ Thomas Jefferson

                Comment


                • #9
                  Forging onward

                  Peter.

                  Turn it with the taper concentric/axially aligned etc. in a 4-jaw chuck and then heat it (furnace or torch -your choice) and hammer/forge it until the taper is "bent" to have the top of the taper aligned to the "flat face" on the top.

                  Most of the "hammer marks) will be on the "bottom" - but do try to prevent and "bouncing" or marking of the top face during forging or bending.

                  It will work - but will require some "care" and "finishing" - so I'd suggest a couple of "practice runs" on "scrap" first.

                  Material choice will be an issue.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    From what I see and from other anvils, that does not look like a perfect "cone" shape. The point seems/ is straight in line with the top and the bottom slopes up to meet it.

                    mark61

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Show and tell

                      S&S (Lin) is quite correct - most if not all are forged.

                      The "block with tapered square holes" is a (Blacksmiths) "swaging block". Some larger anvils have these tapered holes in them too.

                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swage_block
                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anvil

                      It is quite possible to make the centre stem, back tapered "flat" and front round taper/cone separately, weld them together and finish them off.

                      It really gets down to whether you want it as a show-piece or a working/functional tool.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hi Guys

                        Thanks for the feedback.

                        I thought i'd wait until I had a closer look at the device and take some photos (camera phone). The photos arenlt too bad except the autofocus autofocussed more on the background

                        here it is...



                        welded to the support post, not forged it seems...



                        there is a visible center drill hole in the end of the horn...



                        ...to be continued...
                        Last edited by Peter Sanders; 09-24-2008, 12:23 PM.
                        Kind regards

                        Peter

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          ...continuing on from the previous post

                          you can see there are no visbile welds here... (could have been machined away of course, but does not seem likely...



                          this would be the approximate centerline to turn a horn...



                          After a review of the device, it now looks simple enough to turn - I'll probably use a faceplate to mount the (eventually tapered) end.

                          After turning, I'll clamp the bar vertically on the "outside" of the bandsaw and cut the taper that way. I may even use the bandsaw to cut away most of the material surrounding the horn - that would help minimise the amount of interupted cutting.

                          Doing it that way, I would be cutting corners (groan ...)

                          Kind regards

                          Peter
                          Last edited by Peter Sanders; 09-24-2008, 12:19 PM.
                          Kind regards

                          Peter

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hi

                            I just tried photobucket.... it's not bad...

                            please excuse the additional "test" post, here's my slideshow...



                            I wanted to see how well the slideshow feature works...

                            Kind regards

                            Peter
                            Last edited by Peter Sanders; 09-24-2008, 12:24 PM.
                            Kind regards

                            Peter

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