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  • Neat show on right now.

    Natgeo,World's Toughest Fixes-

    http://channel.nationalgeographic.co...s/all/Overview

    Anybody watching?
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  • #2
    Yeah, i saw the 767 repair show.
    The host was bragging about the amazing "Inconel" bolts used to hold the tail onto the body of the plane.
    What's so amazing about Inconel ? ..... except for the fact that it's a bitch to drill.

    Comment


    • #3
      Got it on Tivo -- about to watch it now... Next week's episode is about the power line jumpers, which has been done a thousand times, but maybe they'll show something new.

      The host was bragging about the amazing "Inconel" bolts used to hold the tail onto the body of the plane.
      Inconel is a nickel superalloy designed for ultra-high temperature environments (gas turbine blades, combustors, ...). Anything Inconel should be inside the turbine engines -- I'm surprised they'd use it on tail bolts?
      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by KiddZimaHater
        Yeah, i saw the 767 repair show.
        The host was bragging about the amazing "Inconel" bolts used to hold the tail onto the body of the plane.
        What's so amazing about Inconel ? ..... except for the fact that it's a bitch to drill.
        Did you catch the price of those bolts?
        I just need one more tool,just one!

        Comment


        • #5
          The blast shoes for the space shuttle engines are made from Inconel.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Mcruff
            The blast shoes for the space shuttle engines are made from Inconel.
            Right, I've always seen/heard Inconel used on high-temperature applications. Not sure why a superalloy would be used to bolt the tail on a passenger aircraft?
            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

            Comment


            • #7
              Perhaps it's good against extreme cold as well. Regular cold rolled or HR steel becomes brittle at around 30 below F.

              The price probably reflects that everything that went into making that bolt had to be documented and tested. You just don't run off to Ace Hardware for some screws for your 747.

              Comment


              • #8
                Don't know, but I did see an awsome video and display at the Nasa Glen Research Center during the Ohio tour. I don't remember all the details now, but they were looking at using inconel as a shell for various components of aircraft, including the cabin and jet engines. They blasted a 75 kg slug at it and videotaped the whole the thing. I forget the velocity of the slug, but it was supposed to hit at the same velocity that the aircraft would be flying at, so it was really fast! Anyway, the inconel shell was catastropically damaged, but it managed to dispate the energy before any of the "internals" could be destroyed.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I watched that show apparently in rerun. I think he said of the Inconel bolts that they "probably cost $x000 a piece"...which, if correct, translates to "I made something up so it would sound really amazing"

                  That is a neat show....just before the tail rework, they had one on about replacing a rotor in an unbelievably huge turbine in a nuclear power plant. Talk about tedious....one slip and its got a ding in it rendering it $5 million scrap. On top of that, the inside of the turbine housing is nuclear wasteland so they have to suit up while working once the cap is off the thing. They had to swab the floor after they lifted the 110 ton outer turbine housing and moved it over it with a crane. I wish, however, that they had showed how the bearings for the thing worked and how they went about shimming it all to fit. The turbine shaft itself fits inside a huge housing and that huge housing (with vanes cut to match the shaft) fits inside an outer housing that had the 110 ton one-piece steel outer shell.

                  Its worth seeing.

                  Paul
                  Paul Carpenter
                  Mapleton, IL

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pcarpenter
                    I watched that show apparently in rerun. I think he said of the Inconel bolts that they "probably cost $x000 a piece"...which, if correct, translates to "I made something up so it would sound really amazing"
                    Inconel is a whole family of nickel superalloys, but a quick Google search turned up several dealers of Inconel 600 (one of the more common alloys) running $7.50 - $10.00/lb.

                    It's supposedly a bitch to machine (work-hardens like nobody's business), but even if you had a machine shop make a set of bolts @ $100/hour, they're not going to be thousands of dollars each, unless there's some major FAA certification costs going on...

                    Ironically, I just checked HSM Forum on a new simulation machine at work that doesn't have an Ad Block installed yet, and the HSM Machinist Forum has a neat Flash Ad for The World's Toughest Fixes
                    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by pcarpenter
                      I watched that show apparently in rerun. I think he said of the Inconel bolts that they "probably cost $x000 a piece"...which, if correct, translates to "I made something up so it would sound really amazing"

                      That is a neat show....just before the tail rework, they had one on about replacing a rotor in an unbelievably huge turbine in a nuclear power plant. Talk about tedious....one slip and its got a ding in it rendering it $5 million scrap. On top of that, the inside of the turbine housing is nuclear wasteland so they have to suit up while working once the cap is off the thing. They had to swab the floor after they lifted the 110 ton outer turbine housing and moved it over it with a crane. I wish, however, that they had showed how the bearings for the thing worked and how they went about shimming it all to fit. The turbine shaft itself fits inside a huge housing and that huge housing (with vanes cut to match the shaft) fits inside an outer housing that had the 110 ton one-piece steel outer shell.

                      Its worth seeing.

                      Paul

                      My Dad is a nuclear engineer and always has neat stories about that kind of work. I'll have to see what I can dig out of him about the bearings. A few years ago at the plant where he works they had a problem with a large brake rotor. Basically this is a HUGE metal disk that attaches to one of the steam turbines to prevent over-spinning. Anyway, it had a little warp in it that made it shake so bad that sensors were going crazy. Unfortunantly, they can't just remove the rotor for machining or replacement as you would with a car. It turned out to be cheaper to have a contractor go in, cut out the section that was warped, and actually weld a new section in. That was mind boggling. They had to come up with a procedure to weld in a new section without warping the new section or the remaining rotor. And these puppies spin pretty fast for thier diameter, so its not something you want a weld failing on!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lazlo
                        Inconel is a whole family of nickel superalloys, but a quick Google search turned up several dealers of Inconel 600 (one of the more common alloys) running $7.50 - $10.00/lb.

                        It's supposedly a bitch to machine (work-hardens like nobody's business), but even if you had a machine shop make a set of bolts @ $100/hour, they're not going to be thousands of dollars each, unless there's some major FAA certification costs going on...

                        Ironically, I just checked HSM Forum on a new simulation machine at work that doesn't have an Ad Block installed yet, and the HSM Machinist Forum has a neat Flash Ad for The World's Toughest Fixes
                        I could see them going into the thousands pretty easy.With all of the QC controls,destructive testing and liability involved.

                        Plus I'm thinking that inconel probably doesn't have the same problems as stainless or titanium.
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lazlo
                          ...............It's supposedly a bitch to machine (work-hardens like nobody's business), but even if you had a machine shop make a set of bolts @ $100/hour, they're not going to be thousands of dollars each, unless there's some major FAA certification costs going on..................
                          I remember a news story of some 15 years ago where some bolts were substandard in the tail sections of planes but don't know if any actually fell out of the sky. Yes, the FAA has their hand in what kind of hardware they hold the planes together with.
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                          Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                          It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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