Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

First Lathe

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • First Lathe

    Also first post.

    Will probably be making my first lathe purchase around the beginning of the year. Had thought about going used, but decided that I may be better off buying new. I have narrowed my choices down to...

    A Grizzly 10x22 or Jet 9x20. From what I have been reading, it sounds like they 10x22 is better, but the packaging is lacking.

    The big strong point I have for the Jet is that I can pick it up locally and not have to deal with shipping.

    Opinions?

    Im sure this will result in a epic thread.
    Tim

    Knows a little about many trades.

  • #2
    I understand your concerns as a new buyer looking for new as oposed to used but please don't close your mind too soon.There are a lot of good bargains to be had in some areas .Manufacturing is not what it used to be even in America and a lot of really good stuff is coming onto the markets as firms are closing.This does not mean to say that you will be looking at a dinosaur or very large machine.You may well find schools also selling perfectly good as new machines so between now and the new year at least do your homeowrk checking out all that is on offer.keep your enthusiasm boiling and take your time if you do decide to go new then take best advice you can ask for a demo if possibvle before you part with your hard earned sheckles Alistair
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

    Comment


    • #3
      Welcome aboard!

      Buy used. You'll be happier. If you can keep a crappy ol' ford running, you can fix up a used lathe.

      I bought a Smithy 3-in-1 chineese machine and, after learning the basics, I bought some old American iron. The fit, finish and accuracy of those old machines are better than my Smithy!! Having a new machine might be nice to learn on, but once you get pretty handy as a machinist, you'll want an old "American" lathe.

      *When I say "American", I'm just refrencing the machines from the golden age of machine tools. UK, Germany, etc also made some really nice machine tools.

      Comment


      • #4
        I just want to add in a few points...

        If you do buy used, make sure you gets as many of the attachments (follow/steady rest) for the lathe as you can. Secondly, depending on where you live, used machines can be plentiful or nonexistent. Not to mention in some areas of the country, Old lathes are ridiculously overpriced.

        In your size range, if you want to buy New I would recommend the Lathemaster 9x30 http://lathemaster.com/LATHEMASTER9x30Lathe.htm.
        Last edited by dan s; 10-13-2008, 07:02 PM.
        -Dan S.
        dans-hobbies.com

        Comment


        • #5
          The Jet and Grizzly are both good choices. There is a greater difference between a 9" lathe and a 10" lathe than the one inch may infer. A large lathe is always a better choice than smaller.

          I am not sure what you mean by the packing being lacking, Grizzly is a highly regarded distributor, and have no issues with shipping damage that I am aware of. If there is, I am sure they will rectify the problem.
          Jim H.

          Comment


          • #6
            You anywhere near CT?
            http://hartford.craigslist.org/tls/873337896.html
            I hear the prices aren't bad either.
            Personally, I can't go in there....the first step is to admit you have a problem

            If you go Grizzly look at the 9972Z, 11X26. I've got one and it's a very decent "first" lathe.
            Len

            Comment


            • #7
              Buy a new Chinese lathe and a used American lathe. Then see which one you work with most vs work on most.

              Comment


              • #8
                I have the Jet 9x20 and I am not very impressed with it, not for what it cost anyway. a buddy of mine bought the Harbor Freight 9x20 and danged if I can tell the difference between the two other than the color and price! I know some might say the Jet is of better quality but after using both machines quite a bit I think they are EXACTLY the same except the HF lathe is about $300 cheaper and even includes a few items the Jet does not have, such as a splash guard and a live center included.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Im trying to budget no more then $2 grand for a machine. There is a 5' South Bend on Ebay for $150 right now.

                  http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...ayphotohosting

                  I thought the Jet and the HF one are different? The Jet's spindle taper is different, also minimum speeds.
                  Last edited by OldRedFord; 10-13-2008, 08:08 PM.
                  Tim

                  Knows a little about many trades.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Grizzly Packing

                    I bought a new Grizzly mill and it was packed EXTREMELY well. It took me almost an hour just to unpack my mill. I could have used a chain saw to open the box but I wanted to do it correctly and not damage anything inside, so I disassembled the box to make sure I didn't damage anything.

                    I would have bought a used mill but finding one in my area was hard. The few I did look at were described as in "good working" condition. Perhaps the previous user really enjoyed working with rusty equipment that had handles frozen! After looking for over a year, I bit the bullet and ended up getting a new Grizzly mill and I am really pleased with it.

                    Bill
                    Bill

                    Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

                    Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I hope that's not grinder grit that thing is covered in. Other than that, you might want to get confirmed what it comes with.

                      Originally posted by OldRedFord
                      Im trying to budget no more then $2 grand for a machine. There is a 5' South Bend on Ebay for $150 right now.

                      http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...ayphotohosting
                      -Dan S.
                      dans-hobbies.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Buying used American gear sounds like a good idea when you hear from the experienced folks. That's what I did at first, and ended up with a big old Southbend with issues far beyond my skill and experience to deal with. It sat for years before I finally passed it along to an old machinist who could fix it up and use it.

                        I ended up buying a working, slightly worn, Taiwanese 11" lathe and I was making chips the next day. With it, I was able to learn a lot about turning, threading and all that, and a couple of years later I realized I should look for a more substantial machine. I spent the $$ for a new Hardinge clone from a local family owned tool supplier and metrology shop, and have not regretted that move for an instant.

                        When it came to getting a milling machine, I skipped the first two stages, and bought a new Bridgeport clone - DRO and all.

                        Now, after 6 years of working about 20 hours a week machining in my home shop, I think I could handle old American iron and do at least some of the work necessary to get it in shape.

                        Now, if I had the room, I'd get a bigger lathe to add to my collection, and for that I'd be tossing around the idea of an old Monarch vs. a new higher-end import.

                        Much as you hear disparaging comments about new imported tools, they do have the advantage of being ready to run, particularly if you get them from reputable dealers who service the gear they sell.
                        Last edited by Frank Ford; 10-13-2008, 08:20 PM.
                        Cheers,

                        Frank Ford
                        HomeShopTech

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by OldRedFord
                          I thought the Jet and the HF one are different? The Jet's spindle taper is different, also minimum speeds.

                          No difference in the two that I know of except for the color and I have been around both machines quite a bit. The Jet has the same crappy soft screws and bolts etc, and honestly I can see no difference at all in fit and finish. At the usual $699 "sale" price the HF lathe is not a bad deal at all and I suppose even the Jet is a decent machine but for over $1000 IMO it is not near as good a deal as the HF machine which I am convinced is the exact same thing!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Frank Ford
                            I spent the $$ for a new Hardinge clone from a local family owned tool supplier and metrology shop, and have not regretted that move for an instant.

                            Now, if I had the room, I'd get a bigger lathe to add to my collection, and for that I'd be tossing around the idea of an old Monarch vs. a new higher-end import.

                            Much as you hear disparaging comments about new imported tools, they do have the advantage of being ready to run, particularly if you get them from reputable dealers who service the gear they sell.

                            Don't get a "higher-end import" - get a Monarch. Then you can shine it up and roll it out on the holidays and show off to the neighbors

                            In essence, I agree with what you mean. I could not have handled my Pacemakers four years ago when I bought my import machine. However, if OldRedFord has machining experience or a friend who is a machinist, an American made machine is a great choice. If you know a decent amount about the subject, you can make an informed decision and not get stuck with a lathe that is totally beyond your help. (Don't take that the wrong way! I don't mean for that to sound condescending! I use the term "you" in a general way)

                            On the other hand, I've had the extreme displeasure of using import machine tools. I have yet to find one that has the same fit, finish and ease-of-use as either my Pacemakers, Cincinatti, Leblond, Clausing or Harrison. I've not used any other "American" made machine tools besides those, but comparing them to Emco, Grizzly and MSC ... whew there is a big difference. And these weren't the crappy imports either - they were the nicer large ones with hardened ways and whatever else nonsense they claim. They work fine once you get used to them, but they just aren't as nice to use, imo. And considering that used machines usually go for less than the imports, I'll always look for used machines first!

                            Now thats not to say that you can't get a good import (just look at Mori Seiko!) but then the cost (and size) is way too high for most home-shop budgets!

                            With my import stuff, it seems like they might be able to make chips "right out of the box" but to make chips "comfortably" I end up spending alot of time, money and effort working on less of a machine than I could've bought used. At least that is how my own expierences have been.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I have no machining experience as of yet. But after I finish the welding program at college, I will be taking machine tool. I do have a friend that seems to know his way around a lathe.
                              Tim

                              Knows a little about many trades.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X