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Who owns what power tool brand and where is the company headquartered

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  • Who owns what power tool brand and where is the company headquartered

    Here is an interesting section on a woodworkers web site. The manufacture section goes in depth about the history of each manufacture. Under each manufacture, you can read more about each of their power tools they offer.
    And for instance who makes the Kmart, Craftsman tool and products

    Sears and Craftsman Source Product Code

    LISTING OF SOURCES BY SOURCE NUMBER
    For many products, the first three numbers of the Model Number (usually followed by a decimal point) indicate the actual manufacturer of the product. For instance 316.43234 is a cordless drill built by Ryobi.

    Milwaukee Power Tool Company is a privately held company located in Hong Kong and is an industry leading manufacture of heavy duty tools used worldwide.
    Along with all the other name brands. Who woulda thunk that Black&Decker owns Dewalt, Porter Cable, Delta and others making it the world's largest tool maker.
    Here is an eye opener on a Saturday morning http://professional-power-tool-guide.com/manufacturers/
    Glen
    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

  • #2
    I learned a few weeks ago that Black and Decker owns Dewalt as the products we sell, we have a control numbers/id's to indicate the products origin and who made it...(I work at Fastenal)

    So all the Dewalt tools show up as Black&Deck...

    Almost all of the products have multiple control numbers. An example right off the top of my head is Metabo items. All the grinders are made in Germany, so show up as Metabo as a control number, but their various disks for the grinders have about 4 different control numbers to indicate different manufactures and locations made... including Metabo which of course is made in Germany.

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    • #3
      Made or labeled?



      Milwaukee is headquartered in Brookfield, Wisconsin, which is also home to research, new product development, manufacturing support, marketing, sales and information systems. It has modern production facilities in Greenwood, Jackson and Kosciusko, Mississippi; Blytheville, Arkansas.


      Milwaukee’s power tool and accessories are also manufactured to its exacting standards in modern facilities in Europe and throughout the world. In 2001, the Milwaukee brand was launched in Australia by Milwaukee’s sister company AEG, located in Winnenden, Germany and was re-launched in Europe and the rest of the world in 2002. The company employs over 2,000 people serving customers globally
      My findings.. Things change as fast as the wind blows.

      I really hate things labeled "made in America" when they are ReLabeled in America.
      Excuse me, I farted.

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      • #4
        Black and Decker has owned Dewalt since the early 60's . Heck, I can remember when Black and Decker were actually top notch tools, there mouse sanders even though they look cheap are awesome sanders that hold up exceptionally well.

        I thought Milwaukee was bought about 2 years ago by a Chinese firm.
        edit:
        Milwaukee Electric Tool Corporation was sold to Techtronic Industries, a Hong Kong-based company, in 2005

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        • #5
          Some of the most trusted Harley-parts manufacturers were bought by the Chinese for the "well respected name"..

          What a surprise to pull parts from the American labeled box and see a Made in Tawain label.

          Can you guarantee jobs done with "unknown" parts? no.. I've seen cast cylinders wear out in less than 500 miles. More of the throw-away now, it's wore out technology forced upon us.
          Excuse me, I farted.

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          • #6
            The throw-it-away and get a new one mentality did not include the labor to replace that piece of cr-p Seeing that again and again on ball bearings and plumbing items.

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            • #7
              I knew about Dewalt and B&D. My 14.4 dewalt drill needs new batteries. Wouldn't you know a B&D battery fits. At about 1/2 the cost. Plus the B&D battery is cheaper than having the batteries rebuilt. Of course rebuilding them myself is an option. Anybody have experience with that?
              Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Spin Doctor
                I knew about Dewalt and B&D. My 14.4 dewalt drill needs new batteries. Wouldn't you know a B&D battery fits. At about 1/2 the cost. Plus the B&D battery is cheaper than having the batteries rebuilt. Of course rebuilding them myself is an option. Anybody have experience with that?
                I did it many years ago with success. I had a drill whose batteries were going bad, so when I found a closeout bargain on another brand of the same voltage, I bought it, disassembled it, and rearranged the cells in my old case. If you're careful, and good at soldering, you can do it that way. It may require extra connectors or wires to be soldered in, because you have to snip off some of the tabs. New cells are probably easier, but at the time I couldn't find any that were cheap enough to be a better deal than a whole new battery.

                Thank you, by the way, for the hint on BD batteries, because I also have a 14.4 volt DeWalt drill, and it's about due for new batteries.

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                • #9
                  There is no way to tell where something is actually made regardless of the part numbers or other control numbers etc. At the most that will indicate where some sort of value was last added to the product which can be as simple as repackaging it from bulk to retail packaging. For instance, pipe fittings made in China may be labeled Made in USA if they are deburred in the US. Similar rules apply to other products but there is not yet any unified set of rules that applies to all products. Up until now in the US the rules have been established on a "one product at a time" basis. New rules are in the process of being adopted which will make it possible to claim country of origin as USA if anything is done that alters the duty class of the product. That can be as easy as changing the packaging, the paint color or, as in the case of plumbing fittings, deburring the part as that puts it in a different duty class.

                  The new rules will not depend on the value added, only on changes in duty class. That generally means that any amount of assembly will qualify for a different duty class.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bruto
                    I did it many years ago with success. I had a drill whose batteries were going bad, so when I found a closeout bargain on another brand of the same voltage, I bought it, disassembled it, and rearranged the cells in my old case. If you're careful, and good at soldering, you can do it that way. It may require extra connectors or wires to be soldered in, because you have to snip off some of the tabs. New cells are probably easier, but at the time I couldn't find any that were cheap enough to be a better deal than a whole new battery.

                    Thank you, by the way, for the hint on BD batteries, because I also have a 14.4 volt DeWalt drill, and it's about due for new batteries.
                    I remember a story in a R/C car magazine where the author opened up the rechargeable pack for his drill and replaced the cells in it with matched cells he said it improved his run time, the cells are called sub C cell battery's, you can buy them individually, I don't know what the cost difference would be I didn't run battery powered cars, it might be worth looking in to.
                    Mike
                    Brandon MI
                    2003 MINI Cooper S JCW#249
                    1971 Opel GT
                    1985 Ford 3910LP

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I knew about B&D and Dewalt,B&D made the B&D Industrial line of powertools which were top notch,but they also made the cheap dime store powertools.I remember my first powertool was pea soup green 1/4" B&D drill when I was 8,cost me $9.25.Still had it until a few years ago,even the cheap stuff used to be decent.

                      DeWalt,well they are famous for Radial arn saws.I was pleased to pick up one of these at auction a few years back-


                      Mine is a 5HP 1~ 16" super duty unit.These saws make the Rockwells look and feel dinky.

                      The RAS divison was sold off and divided up and the B&D industrial line was re-named Dewalt which now bears no resemblance to the old line.

                      The Ogrinal Saw co. now builds the RAS and Wolfe Machinery does rebuilds of DeWalt RAS.

                      http://www.wolfemachinery.com/
                      I just need one more tool,just one!

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                      • #12
                        porter cable is also owned by black and decker as well

                        aparently rayobi now also owns rigid

                        ill certenly never by delta or portorcable now i know they are owned by Black and decker

                        delta is also way over priced as well , my rigid cordless drills i just bought can eat for breakfast delta and BD drills in a heart beat even mastercraft cant touch rigid ...

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by wierdscience
                          I knew about B&D and Dewalt,B&D made the B&D Industrial line of powertools which were top notch,but they also made the cheap dime store powertools.I remember my first powertool was pea soup green 1/4" B&D drill when I was 8,cost me $9.25.Still had it until a few years ago,even the cheap stuff used to be decent.

                          DeWalt,well they are famous for Radial arn saws.I was pleased to pick up one of these at auction a few years back-


                          Mine is a 5HP 1~ 16" super duty unit.These saws make the Rockwells look and feel dinky.

                          The RAS divison was sold off and divided up and the B&D industrial line was re-named Dewalt which now bears no resemblance to the old line.

                          The Ogrinal Saw co. now builds the RAS and Wolfe Machinery does rebuilds of DeWalt RAS.

                          http://www.wolfemachinery.com/
                          I love old DeWalt radial arm saws. I am green (well, sort of a speckled olive green, perhaps) with envy!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            DW sale

                            Black & Decker's Canadian head office in Brockville is holding a clear out sale on 7-9 (inclusive) Nov. Includes B&D, DeWalt, Delta & Porter Cable. Don't have any idea of what (or quantities) will be on sale.

                            Have purchased - many years ago - stuff from their factory outlet at the same location and found some real deals. Most was "industrial quality" and still works.

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