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  • Wells saw adjustment??

    Hi, Got a new saw, don't know much about it, but the blade seems to cut well.
    Put in some 4" round steel shafting, About 1/2 way through the cut the blade will jam and jump off the wheel. Blade tension is pretty tight, blade seems to ride on the wheels where it should. The cut seems to wander, the piece of stock being cut off gets slightly thicker as the cut progresses. I can't find any serious damage or kinks in the blade.
    So, saw adjustment, or try different blade. Try adjustment first.
    Well, historically I haven't had much luck with adjusting bandsaws. Can I get some help on the proper setup of a wells type saw? Here's what I have:

    Click for full size - Uploaded with plasq's Skitch
    and the multiple guide adjustments:

    Click for full size - Uploaded with plasq's Skitch

    Click for full size - Uploaded with plasq's Skitch

    Click for full size - Uploaded with plasq's Skitch
    I guess that the upper screws move the guide laterally and the lower tilt the bearings? Anyone with some tips before I start??
    Thanks for your help.
    Paul L

  • #2
    Over in yesterday's thread, Weirdscience found and linked the manual for these saws. (It's a PDF. Other saw model options here.)

    If it's binding, welll, I'm no expert yet, but that's a pretty thick piece for what looks like a pretty fine-tooth blade. For something that size, I think you'd need to go with a much coarser blade.

    You might also try some lube, maybe just a spritz of WD-40 at least.

    And last, you may have an already-worn blade that's lost some set, or worse, lost the set on just one side.

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

    Comment


    • #3
      The first tip before you start is to replace the blade. If you start trying to adjust a bandsaw with a blade that is worn, or has partially lost it's set as Doc suggests, you will chase your tail all day long. If you have any success, you will have to readjust when you do replace the blade.

      There have been a couple of posts on making a straight edge to clamp to the blade to check for perpendicularity if the blade. It is basically just a straight piece of steel with a relief milled for the teeth. It is clamped to the blade, and checked with a square. Set the blade with this.

      Do check for worn, damaged or repaired blade guides and make sure everything is in line. Inspect the frame pivot and bearings for looseness or excessive play.
      Jim H.

      Comment


      • #4
        Paul...What JC said...get a new blade. Go to Acklands and get a Lennox blade(I use 5-8 pitch...pretty course but no biggie if you have adjustable down). These Lennox blades are in a class of their own...worth every penny IMO.
        I strongly suggest you do NOT try a Simmonds blade. They are made out at the coast and used to be one of the best blades around. No longer the case. The welds break on everyone i've tried in the last year. About 30 of them. I was taking them back to the dealer...they'd replace them. Then the dealer went out of business.
        Blade tension...be careful. Darin pointed out to me that these saws don't need much blade tension. Tighten it up til you think it's too loose...that's just about right...lol! Honestly.. My lil 4X6, I have to tighen the crap out of it...this one...hardly any pressure.
        They have a mightly strong blade tensioner.
        Another caution...the vises on these saws.... watch them. The sliding dog that pushes on the jaws...Always back the handwheel up and make sure it hasn't run out of travel. A couple of times now I've broke a $75 blade because I thought the vise was tight. It wasn't...the handwheel screw had run out of travel. It just worked out that the sliding dog caught in just the right place so the stock felt tight enough...that combined with the fact that I'd tightened the snot out of the vise screw (that had run out of travel) led me to believe the vise was tight. It wasn't pretty.
        Somewhere here is a thread that shows how I put an air over hydraulic downfeed/lift cylinder setup on mine...with help from all the geniuses here...lol!
        Russ
        I have tools I don't even know I own...

        Comment


        • #5
          Here you go...all the trials and tribulations...lol! (Psssst...use the bigger diameter cylinder than i did)(And yes.. I did cleanup all the lines etc...looks nice and neat now)
          http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...t=Air+cylinder
          Russ
          I have tools I don't even know I own...

          Comment


          • #6
            OK, will first try a new blade, still, can anyone answer the adjustment questions?
            Paul

            Comment


            • #7
              Paul...what I did to check mine when I first got it..clamped a short piece of alu bar to the blade in the verticle position. Checked that against a square on the table. Mine was good there.
              Then i pushed the guides as far apart as I could get them...hoisted the saw up and eyeballed the blade to see if it had any dogleg in it.
              Then set the saw back down and put a square against the back fence to check against blade alignment.
              Then stood a big framing square up on the table and checked the swing travel for any runnout.
              Sorry...everything checked out fine so I didn't have to make any adjustments.
              This antique lookin old saw will cut to .005 (vert) in 6". I can live with that.
              But then...us round column mill guys are pretty easy to please
              BTW...you can have a perfect running saw...put a wonky blade in it and it'll drive you nuts. I've even had new blades cut crooked and blamed the saw(with my 4X6)
              Russ
              I have tools I don't even know I own...

              Comment


              • #8
                OK Torker, now I'm going to have to try the hydraulic downfeed! Promise, just as soon as I have time! First I'll concentrate on the blade problems.
                Did the kerosene solve your problems?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ya...the kerosene helped but it still needs a bit bigger cylinder. I have all the part numbers for the stuff from Princess auto if you want to use the same stuff. Pretty reasonable money wise.
                  Russ
                  I have tools I don't even know I own...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here's a link to most any manual from the Wells or Wellsaw companies. There is also a small troubleshooting guide and a couple of links that might be helpful. There is an intersting chart on analyzing blade and cutting issues at the Simmonds Industrial link. I never even knew there was a "North American Sawing Association" [NASA]

                    http://wellsaw.com/index.php?option=...ask=view&id=17

                    By the way, I've had good luck with the Starrett bimetal bandsaw blades on my little Wells 5m. I've looked at Lennox, but usually can't find a blade small enough. Seems like they all satart at around 1".

                    Your pictures look very similar to my #5, but I notice one of your overarm brackets is different than the other. Could be a newer replacement, that doesn't match the old one. Both of mine look like the ouboard one (closest to the vise tightening handle)
                    Last edited by Jim Caudill; 10-21-2008, 03:49 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Paul, the more I look at your pictures, the more concerned I am about the 2 different brackets. You might want to measure from the overarm support to the top of the saw blade to see if the blade is traveling parallel. It could be that if the more "squarish" looking bracket is indeed a newer replacement, that they may have reccommended that they be replaced in "pairs".

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Good eye Jim...geez...that one slipped right by me.
                        The "real" one should be the one with the thumbscrew in it. Of course...it doesn't matter if they are the same. They're a pretty simple thing to deal with if you have to modify it.
                        I have tools I don't even know I own...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The lower (blade) ends of the Wells saws have a movable element, that can both slide left and right, and also pivot. I doubt there's enough mismatch between the arms that that adjustment can't compensate.

                          But, it's also definitely worth a look to be sure that said adjustment has, in fact, been adjusted properly, and somebody didn't just throw that arm on and try to saw away.

                          Doc.
                          Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The 2nd arm has been fabricated, but looks ok. Whole saw has been severely damaged at one time - lots of broken castings have been welded up. I'll get a new blade soon and check tings out. Blade looks to be 1/2" and about 98 inches, is this a common size?
                            Torker, may have found a cylinder, I'll cut it loose and check it out.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The exact blade dimensions that I have is 98-1/2" x 1/2" x .025"

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