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  • 220 wire for shed

    i am finally getting close to running good 220 power to my shed to run my SB13. i got wire today, 2-2-2 aluminum good for 100 AMPS. the question i have is what type of connector do i need to connect the aluminum to the copper wire ( splice ). is this something i can make. I'm told there is some material between the copper and aluminum wire when clamping together so they won't react with each other. any one got a pic of said connector?

  • #2
    Originally posted by quadrod
    i am finally getting close to running good 220 power to my shed to run my SB13. i got wire today, 2-2-2 aluminum good for 100 AMPS. the question i have is what type of connector do i need to connect the aluminum to the copper wire ( splice ). is this something i can make. I'm told there is some material between the copper and aluminum wire when clamping together so they won't react with each other. any one got a pic of said connector?
    I am not sure what you mean by, "what type of connector do I need to connect the aluminum to the copper wire (splice)." I would have thought that the aluminum would go into a plug-in and that is determined by the circuit breaker you put in (they are amp rated). Or that is how my kitchen stove in put in. As for the, "there is some material between the copper and aluminum wire when clamping together so they won't react with each other." Check with your local hardware store, there is a "grease" like stuff that you use. I am not sure where mine is or I would give you a name, sorry.

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    • #3
      You'll probably have to go to an electrical supply house. The connector will cost around $8 each. It is basically a plated copper tube with a wall in the middle. You insert the aluminum in one end and tighten a pinch bolt, then insert the copper wire in the other and tighten its bolt. It would definitely be a good idea to coat the aluminum wire with the "oxide prevention" stuff. The barrier in the middle prevents the copper wire and aluminum wire from ever making contact with each other.

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      • #4
        You might be well-advised to put a 100a panel in the shed; then you can have a local breaker, and also can later add other electrical service as needed.

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        • #5
          A popular brand of that anti-oxidant past is "No Alox" or something similar. Use it on every aluminum connection; some folks use it on all connections.

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          • #6
            You can get the bare connectors at Home Depot, if there is one nearby. If you go to an electrical supply, you can get one that is insulated. The insulated connectors are more than double the price of the bare unit.

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            • #7
              got three connectors tonight at Lowe's, 6.00 each, also got the anti oxidant and lots of tape to tape up the spices. will have a breaker box in the shed and a ground at the shed. i would think 8-12 breaker box should do it for now. i have direct to bury cable but will run it in 1 1/2 PVC conduit under ground. gonna be a bitch to dig the 130ft ditch for the conduit.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Jim Caudill
                The connector will cost around $8 each. It is basically a plated copper tube with a wall in the middle.
                Too Late

                I should have checked this thread earlier

                Those Mechanical Butt Splices are known for a rather high failure rate. the poster would have been much better off with Kearneys (also known as split bolt) connectors.



                Of course ALL Al connections by code "shall" be coated with an antioxident.

                Compression type butt connectors work because the Hi-Press crimping tool delivers an awsome 15,000 psi crimp. And over a much larger surface area as well. The 3/8 allen screws don't provide enough surface connection and all too often work theirself loose with the thermal expansion and contraction associated with use
                Last edited by JoeFin; 10-24-2008, 12:56 AM.

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                • #9
                  Where I work the lab support folks have learned to monitor aluminum connections in panel boxes w/ IR non-contact thermometers; we've had a couple of near fires due to Al wire oxidation...
                  Bart Smaalders
                  http://smaalders.net/barts

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                  • #10
                    Joe the connector i got is a split bolt design but made from aluminum, labeled for copper and aluminum, it has a small plate to separate the copper wire from the aluminum wire. torque to 285 in-lb.

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                    • #11
                      The horror stories about aluminum wire fires are NOT exaggerated, heed all warnings and take all precautions. A good friend of mine lost his home to aluminum wiring (his house was wired before the problems were widely recognized) he did not even know he had aluminum wire in his house.

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                      • #12
                        the aluminum wire will just run from the service line, where it goes into the house but still out side the house, through a weather head, under ground out to the shed and to a breaker box. then all coper inside the shed.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by quadrod
                          Joe the connector i got is a split bolt design but made from aluminum, labeled for copper and aluminum, it has a small plate to separate the copper wire from the aluminum wire. torque to 285 in-lb.
                          PERFECT !

                          Smoother with NoLox or any other approved antioxident, and tighten well. Wrap with Cambric thermal tape, then Rubber Tape, then regular pvc Electrical tape - should last a life time







                          Last edited by JoeFin; 10-24-2008, 11:38 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Another anti oxident product is called PENETROX A Oxide inhibiting Compound supplied by Burndy.

                            https://portal.fciconnect.com/res/en...ccessories.pdf


                            Ham radio operators like myself use this on our aluminum antennas just for the above reasons. Years can go by and the coated parts have ont oxided a bit. Just as shiny the first day. I have a 8 oz bottle in my tool box.

                            Dennis

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                            • #15
                              The aluminum wire that caused all of the fires was a different alloy, and was not properly engineered. Things have changed since then.

                              I'd love to run copper to my garage, but it would have cost more than a new garage.

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