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  • #16
    Ian- I believe the inherent lowest on this Nichols mill is 200 rpm. But with the VFD, of course, I can dial it down from there.

    And I already have a couple of plans for different tool-and-cutter grinders, including one potentially from scratch, and the other a modification of my old Van Dorn "valve and tool" grinder.

    One thing I'd like to be able to do is some minor profiling to certain cutters, so I can make a tool that, for example, makes a groove with tapered sides, in one pass.

    And yes, I know I'll never, ever, need all... well, the latest update is actually... um, twelve hundred cutters, when taking into account the small slitting saws and whatnot...

    But anyway, yes, I expect I'll be selling off some of the inevitable duplicates, plus anything over 6" OD, since that's the largest the Nichols can swing on an overarm arbor, and then anything with an arbor bore over 1-1/4".

    But I'm getting ahead of myself, as I don't even have them in hand yet.

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

    Comment


    • #17
      Wow Big Haul.....

      Lot O Cutting action available now

      Makes my Free little Unimat SL, look like a puny Score...

      My 2 Horizontals can swing up to 12 in OD Cutters

      Let us know when the Goodies arrive...

      Comment


      • #18
        A suggestion:

        One thing that doesn't appear to be part of this collection are wide slabbing cutters. I'd like to have a couple of these, say, 3" OD by 2" wide, 3" wide and/or 4" wide (or thereabouts.)

        Nice and sharp for doing primarily aluminum, 1" or 1-1/4" arbor.

        If anyone has anything in this ballpark, and would like to trade for a selection of whatever I can spare, let me know. Or at least keep it in mind 'til I actually have the cutters on hand and can do a proper inventory, anyway.

        I could also really use an NMTB-40 arbor, of any length, in 1-1/4" diameter, preferably with at least some spacers and a nut. Actually, for either the above cutters or this arbor, I'd be happy to buy outright if you have something available and don't necessarily wish to trade.

        Doc.
        Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

        Comment


        • #19
          To swing some of those, you will need more like 40 RPM.......... The VFD may give you little power that low, which would be 10 or 12 Hz.......
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Comment


          • #20
            Good point. Checking Tony's site, the Nichols article says the lowest speed is actually 100 rpm for the 1HP motor and five-step pullies.

            And I expect that the vast majority of my work, just like my work on the vertical mill, will be in aluminum, which will withstand somewhat faster cutting speeds.

            Last, the biggest cutter the Nichols can spin is six inches. I would imagine the majority of my work will be at 4" OD and below, so assuming all that, hopefully I won't run out of adjustment too quickly.

            Doc.
            Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Doc Nickel
              Good point. Checking Tony's site, the Nichols article says the lowest speed is actually 100 rpm for the 1HP motor and five-step pullies.

              And I expect that the vast majority of my work, just like my work on the vertical mill, will be in aluminum, which will withstand somewhat faster cutting speeds.

              Last, the biggest cutter the Nichols can spin is six inches. I would imagine the majority of my work will be at 4" OD and below, so assuming all that, hopefully I won't run out of adjustment too quickly.

              Doc.
              Aluminum works OK with faster speeds, like 300 FPM. Mild steel is Ok at up to maybe 100 FPM max, better to stay at 80, most likely.

              Tool type steels may need as low as 40 FPM.

              A 4" cutter is 12.5" circumference, or 1.05 feet.

              So 300 FPM with a 4" cutter is 285 rpm approx.

              80 FPM is 76 rpm with a 4" cutter.

              and finally, 40 FPM requires 38 RPM with a 4" cutter.

              For a 6", take 2/3 of those rpms.

              You may find that you burn corners off cutters and saws if working steels other than 1020 types, in which case you should slow down. One problem is that unless you have the power to boost the feed way up, the depth of cut per tooth is tiny, and most teeth just rub.

              I find that a horizontal mill wants a slower RPM and a heavier feed, to make the cutters happiest. Mine goes down to 30 RPM with back gears, and I end up using that quite a bit.
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by J Tiers
                80 FPM is 76 rpm with a 4" cutter.
                -So worst case, at least as far as I can forsee for the bulk of my work, is that I might have to use the VFD to turn the motor speed down by just 25 - 30%.

                That's doable.

                Or, I can use a cutter- which I'll bet I have - with fewer teeth for the same OD, to get the chipload back up for the unreduced spindle speed.

                Unfortunately the Nichols doesn't have a backgear, but again, with the majority of my work being in aluminum, hopefully I won't have too many problems with it.

                Doc.
                Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

                Comment


                • #23
                  Doc... you have enough they could be considered disposable


                  <just kidding>

                  Originally posted by Doc Nickel
                  -So worst case, at least as far as I can forsee for the bulk of my work, is that I might have to use the VFD to turn the motor speed down by just 25 - 30%.

                  That's doable.

                  Or, I can use a cutter- which I'll bet I have - with fewer teeth for the same OD, to get the chipload back up for the unreduced spindle speed.

                  Unfortunately the Nichols doesn't have a backgear, but again, with the majority of my work being in aluminum, hopefully I won't have too many problems with it.

                  Doc.
                  --
                  Tom C
                  ... nice weather eh?

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Final tally, wrapped, boxed and shipped: 1,227 cutters, of which a full third are new-in-the-wax. Plus five broken ones my loyal minion is going to throw in with his knifemaking steel stash.

                    That ended up being twelve small and one large USPS Flat-Rate boxes, with an estimated final weight somewhere north of six hundred pounds.

                    I might have to get a horizontal arbor for my vertical mill just to use them all.

                    Doc.
                    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Next Step

                      Get a Mill for every 100 Cutters....
                      And a Shop for every 10 Mills... Mines getting tight with just 3....
                      Might want to give the Kenai Post Office, some Back Pain Pills, if they come in same day
                      Last edited by Bguns; 10-31-2008, 04:50 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Well, as much as I like my Nichols- it's fairly small and compact, and my shop is quite crowded- I'd still actually, someday, like to get a bigger one, something with maybe 5 HP and a 50 taper and a big cast iron dovetail overarm...

                        I don't have the room for it, I don't really even have the need for it, but if I ever run across one that's fairly cheap, I'll probably still jump at it.

                        Doc.
                        Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Doc Nickel

                          That's doable.

                          Or, I can use a cutter- which I'll bet I have - with fewer teeth for the same OD, to get the chipload back up for the unreduced spindle speed.
                          it doesn't quite work that way, but you can try it for yourself..... and see.....

                          There is chipload, there is power, there is straight SFM and cutter edge heating.........fast dulls cutters by wear even at higher chiploads if the speed is up. And it takes power. Inserted carbide plus power equals high speeds.

                          Fewer teeth has other problems...... that lovely banging noise until the teeth are well in. You generally need to have about 2.5 teeth buried in the work at once to avoid the banging during a cut.
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Doc Nickel
                            Well, as much as I like my Nichols- it's fairly small and compact, and my shop is quite crowded- I'd still actually, someday, like to get a bigger one, something with maybe 5 HP and a 50 taper and a big cast iron dovetail overarm...

                            I don't have the room for it, I don't really even have the need for it, but if I ever run across one that's fairly cheap, I'll probably still jump at it.

                            Doc.
                            Doc..nothing I've run to date can compare to a horizontal with 50 taper for just pure meaness when it comes to chompin metal.
                            It still amazes me when i can bury the whole 6" shell mill almost 3/16" deep in
                            a big block of steel.... and the machine doesn't even grunt or chatter or anything. It doesn't even slow down. Even at just 250 rpm the roostertail of chips is awesome to watch... at WOT (384 rpm) it's bloody wicked!
                            I'm really looking forward to see what my VN can do....three times the rpm,twice the hp and twice the weight of my Ohio
                            Russ
                            I have tools I don't even know I own...

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