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  • 44-henry
    replied
    I teach several computer aided design classes at the University of North Dakota and we are currently using AutoCAD 2008. AutoCAD definitely has a learning curve but it does have many advantages and is very quick once you get the hang of it (definitely want to learn to use the command line). If anyone is interested www.mycadsite.com has some great tutorials that proceed in a very natural fashion and I use a lot of the introductory lessons in the beginning of my one hundred level course.

    Leave a comment:


  • loose nut
    replied
    [QUOTE=gn3dr]
    Originally posted by loose nut
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lazlo
    http://labs.autodesk.com/technologies/inventor_lt/

    QUOTE]

    Does anyone know how to get this in Europe? The above download is only for AUS & the US.
    There should be a download available from each country or group of countries (not always though) but you might be able to download it through a proxy server in a country that has it available.

    Great program worth looking for.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nick Carter
    replied
    I think there's a script available, ask on the Rhino NG. On is the math plugin which will just generate an involute, but there's a dedicated gear one as well...
    You can also follow my somewhat more involved article here:
    http://www.cartertools.com/involute.html
    Which will work in any CAD program, but is laborious.

    Originally posted by dp
    Anyone seen a tutorial on drawing involute spur gears in Rhino?

    Leave a comment:


  • gn3dr
    replied
    [QUOTE=loose nut]Quote:
    Originally Posted by lazlo
    http://labs.autodesk.com/technologies/inventor_lt/

    Looks good, but it says that Inventor LT is a time-limited demo that stops functioning on May 1, 2009?

    "Once activated, Autodesk Inventor LT Technology Preview 2009 will run until May 1, 2009."



    They did that last year too and when it expired the "new" version was available for free downloading.
    QUOTE]

    Does anyone know how to get this in Europe? The above download is only for AUS & the US.

    Leave a comment:


  • dp
    replied
    Rhino 4 spur gear

    Anyone seen a tutorial on drawing involute spur gears in Rhino?

    Leave a comment:


  • BillH
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by loose nut
    You have to decide what you want the cad program to do for you. 2D and "semi" 3d like Solidworks 2D and Autocad are good drafting programs that replaced the drafting board and pencils. Parametric modelers like Solidworks and Inventor are design packages.

    You have to separate the apples from the oranges, they don't really do the things the same way. If you want to do a simple drawing or layout a 2D pathway for CNC then the simpler program shines but when you want to design a complete machine then that were the Parametric 3D modelers really come into there own, they have a big advantage for those that can use them but not without some penalties, like longer drawing time. This can be offset buy a shorter lead time to manufacturing in other areas but it generally requires medium to large scale quantity production to justify it.

    On the other hand it's a pile of fun and if you aren't working to a clock then the time it takes to learn and draw the offending assemblies of parts doesn't matter anyway.

    Just decide what you want it for, work or hobby, simple or complex.
    I use solid works for design, I freaking love it! MasterCam X3 on the other hand, I have no freaking clue as to how to use it... Well not that it matters, I don't even own a CNC anything...

    Leave a comment:


  • loose nut
    replied
    You have to decide what you want the cad program to do for you. 2D and "semi" 3d like Solidworks 2D and Autocad are good drafting programs that replaced the drafting board and pencils. Parametric modelers like Solidworks and Inventor are design packages.

    You have to separate the apples from the oranges, they don't really do the things the same way. If you want to do a simple drawing or layout a 2D pathway for CNC then the simpler program shines but when you want to design a complete machine then that were the Parametric 3D modelers really come into there own, they have a big advantage for those that can use them but not without some penalties, like longer drawing time. This can be offset buy a shorter lead time to manufacturing in other areas but it generally requires medium to large scale quantity production to justify it.

    On the other hand it's a pile of fun and if you aren't working to a clock then the time it takes to learn and draw the offending assemblies of parts doesn't matter anyway.

    Just decide what you want it for, work or hobby, simple or complex.

    Leave a comment:


  • loose nut
    replied
    Originally posted by lazlo
    http://labs.autodesk.com/technologies/inventor_lt/

    Looks good, but it says that Inventor LT is a time-limited demo that stops functioning on May 1, 2009?

    "Once activated, Autodesk Inventor LT Technology Preview 2009 will run until May 1, 2009."

    They did that last year too and when it expired the "new" version was available for free downloading.

    Leave a comment:


  • fasto
    replied
    I've got Solidworks 2008, PDM works, fastener library, full boat - it cost around $10k (with training & service plan). It's very nice. It's very easy to draw objects that cannot be manufactured. It's very easy to hose yourself with the parametric functions. It's very easy to go totally overboard with the design.
    I hired an "experienced" cad guy to run it. He did a nice first drawing, a simple aluminum panel. I had him change the size of the panel a little bit which should have left the holes that attach the PCB to the panel alone, and I stupidly didn't double check it. He had defined the holes relative to each panel side (why?) and the holes moved all over. Fifty brand new junk panels arrived in good time.
    From then on I insisted that each element installed be totally defined relative to itself. This is not the way its taught. I got lots of arguments. Since I pay the bills my view won.
    Myself, I use Autocad LT98. I've been using Autocad since R13 and it's very fast for me to use. I agree that 'offset' is your friend. Solidworks' 2d module is supposed to be quite good. I should probably try someday, as my $10k is sitting on that desk....

    Leave a comment:


  • lazlo
    replied
    Originally posted by PaulT
    Search "Inventor LT" and you'll hit the download page. The built in tutorials are too simple to really learn how to use it, but if you look at the download page you'll find a link to some pretty in depth online tutorials
    http://labs.autodesk.com/technologies/inventor_lt/

    Looks good, but it says that Inventor LT is a time-limited demo that stops functioning on May 1, 2009?

    "Once activated, Autodesk Inventor LT Technology Preview 2009 will run until May 1, 2009."

    Leave a comment:


  • PaulT
    replied
    Bill H., you should definitely try out the free version of Inventor LT that was mentioned by an earlier poster. I own and used to use Rhino as my primary design package, but hardly fire it up anymore at all after discovering the Inventor package.

    Its much more "nuts and bolts" oriented than Rhino, but still capable of a pretty high level design flow. It took me about week to learn how to use it but it was worth it, it really improved my design capabilities.

    Search "Inventor LT" and you'll hit the download page. The built in tutorials are too simple to really learn how to use it, but if you look at the download page you'll find a link to some pretty in depth online tutorials.

    Paul T.

    Leave a comment:


  • BillH
    Guest replied
    Right now I am playing with Solid Works 8.0 and Master Cam X3, I wish I knew how to use Master Cam, it sure imports Solid Works files without a problem. Don't ask.

    Leave a comment:


  • lane
    replied
    Originally posted by RTPBurnsville
    SolidEdge has a free 2D package that is very nice. This is a professional quality software package, check it out.

    http://www.plm.automation.siemens.co...2d/index.shtml

    No connection, just a very happy user.....
    I use and like it . Not smart enough to figure it all out . But easy to learn to draw with .Free and has a good place to go and ask questions and get answers with in 1 day. the new V100 version is even a lot better than .V19 are V20

    Leave a comment:


  • lazlo
    replied
    Windows XP can only use 3 GBytes of RAM anyway. In fact, before Service Pack 2, Windows XP could only use 2 Gbyte of RAM, because Microsoft maps 2 GByte of Kernel space into each user space (think: application) to reduce context-switch overhead when you make kernel calls.

    With Service Pack 2, Microsoft released a patch that shrunk the amount of memory they map into each user space to 1 GByte, which leaves 3 GByte for any 1 application.

    Windows Server 2003 doesn't have that limitation, and neither does Vista, but the latter is a whole 'nuther set of headaches.

    Leave a comment:


  • dp
    replied
    Originally posted by Stepside
    If the RAM question is in regard to Rhino then the answer is 2 GIG is adequate for most things. If doing some intricate design work then 4 GIG might be better.
    I've been running it here in a Windows XP virtual machine that has been allocated 740K of ram and it's been working fine. I've also been using the Mac version on my Mac laptop with 2gig and it 's been fine there, too. I don't normally have a lot of objects to deal with, though. I think the most complex drawing I've used is the demo camera.

    Too bad there's not an intermediate pricing available for people who are neither students nor corporations/Professionals. Don't even know how that could be made to work, though - although a metered system that checks the mothership via encrypted link and provides run-time at each startup/save could work.

    Leave a comment:

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