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Shiny New Yuasa Rotay Table Arrived Early

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  • Shiny New Yuasa Rotay Table Arrived Early

    I had to get some work done so I ordered a shiny new Yuasa 550-050 rotary table from my local tool supply on Monday. It shipped to Huntsville, AL truck freight from the national factory location in Illinois and arrived today when my rep dropped it by the house. Unfortunately, it uses 12mm T slots so I have to order a set of new T nuts and posts.

    My friends at Ameritool called MSC before ordering it from the factory in case MSC was cheaper or could get it sooner. What was interesting is that MSC wanted a little under twice list price to sell it to Ameritool. Needless to say, Ameritool ordered it from the factory. Fortunately, they charged me 5% under list price.

    I'm waiting for an 1/8 mt-3 collet that should arrive tomorrow so that I can place a dowel pin on dead center to use for alignment in cutting the round corners of o-ring grooves.

    I developed rotary table envy from looking at the pictures lazlo posted the other day

  • #2
    I'm pretty jealous of your Yuasa R/T...but i don't quite get the T nut thing?
    I've never bought a T nut. Can't ya just make them?
    BTW...Ummm...how muchy for that R/T? Them things are scarey expensive up here..
    Russ
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

    Comment


    • #3
      torker,

      Thanks for the cajoling on T nuts. I guess I'll make a batch as TE-CO clamp sets are scary expensive. I was hoping not to have to invest too much time making tooling but seeing as how I don't have what I need tonight, I guess that huge chunk of 4140 should be good for something. I of course don't have the right tap in stock to make them the standard thread.

      The rotary table complete with calibration certificate for flatness parallellness etc came to about $950US plus freight (I have an account so the whole damage report won't be known till the invoice arrives). The buggers at MSC wanted $1600 wholesale! I suppose I could have found a deal on a used one on e-bay but I needed it "yesterday" and I'm starting to believe that heavy machine tool accessories often make it to e-bay only when too broken to be useful.

      --Cameron

      Comment


      • #4
        Funny how machine tools are contagious
        The Yuasa rotabs really are gorgeous. I completely took mine apart, cleaned it and re-assembled, and was pleasantly surprised to see a hardened steel worm wheel and a giant bronze worm gear.

        BTW Cameron, 12mm is an RCH away from 7/16". I use the TECO 7/16" T-slot and stud set in my Yuasa -- fits great:





        Normally $78, got it on the bi-monthly 30% off sale for $55.
        Last edited by lazlo; 12-03-2008, 10:27 PM.
        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

        Comment


        • #5
          Well,

          I had a 3 foot piece of 1x4 4140 lying on the floor. I hacked out a piece of T-Nut stock to fit the table but still need to cut it into separate nuts and decide what size to drill and tap them and make studs out of chunk of the piece of 1/2 diameter of 4150 lying around here somewhere.

          Only three and a half hours and 1 corner of a pair of TNG 322 inserts consumed so far and I still need another couple hours to drill them and thread them which may involve boring the hole to size and single pointing since I almost certainly lack the tap. It looks like I'll just make a couple of studs and nuts as getting anything locally quickly looks painful.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by ckelloug
            still need to cut it into separate nuts and decide what size to drill and tap them
            The Teco set uses 3/8"-16 studs.
            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ckelloug
              torker,

              ... I suppose I could have found a deal on a used one on e-bay but I needed it "yesterday" and I'm starting to believe that heavy machine tool accessories often make it to e-bay only when too broken to be useful.

              --Cameron
              I got lucky with my Fritz Werner 250mm RT it was just missing the graduated hand wheel but for $50 (£35) I got an RT with almost totally unmarked table (a couple of very fine shallow scratches) and a smooth no backlash 120 turn mechanism. I just now need to get into training to lift it easily (50Kg ).

              The handwheel I can make and mark now I have the RT



              p.s. I had to make new T nuts for this as well but I'm sticking with 8mm studding (all thread) (all the clamps and jacks are homemade in this picture)
              Last edited by derekm; 12-04-2008, 12:22 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                That is a beautiful table.........drool...... and really a great price.

                I somehow missed (along with everone else) a 10" Yuasa on ebay about 6 months ago for .99c opening bid, looked fairly clean but as you say what are the internals like? Anyway it must have sent a little chill down the sellers spine as he dodged that bullet and held onto it for awhile. He relisted it 2 weeks ago at $500 buy it now or highest offer, I offered $250 and he said I was too cheap......he never realized it was $249.01 more than I should have paid for it.......oh well the pursuit continues.........LOL
                Opportunity knocks once, temptation leans on the doorbell.....

                Comment


                • #9
                  I just completed the hour drive to acquire 2ea 3/8 16 taps and 6ea 5/16 tap drills to finish this "nutty" project. Fortunately, there is a piece of not so nice looking 4150 stock that has Stud written all over it standing against the mantle in the living room

                  Lazlo,

                  Thanks for the specs on nuts.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ckelloug
                    I just completed the hour drive to acquire 2ea 3/8 16 taps and 6ea 5/16 tap drills to finish this "nutty" project. Fortunately, there is a piece of not so nice looking 4150 stock that has Stud written all over it standing against the mantle in the living room

                    Lazlo,

                    Thanks for the specs on nuts.
                    Why not use all thread? (studding as we like to call it over here)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      derekm,

                      Good Point.

                      Really, allthread probably makes more sense. I guess I should head for the hardware store and see what I can find. I understand that hardened stuff is nicer because it can be tightened down tighter without distorting but practically speaking, at least this week, all I need to do is mill 8 round o-ring groove corners on a specific part and I am still waiting for a couple of the other bits and pieces to arrive.

                      --Cameron

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I used Home Depot 3/8" all thread for those weird 3/8" -> 8mm studs I needed for the servo mounting plate. They work OK, but the Chinese all thread is Class -II fit, so the studs fit pretty sloppy, and you need to crank down on them to snug-up the workpiece. I also threaded the 8mm section with fine pitch, thinking it would leave more major diameter on the stud, but that was stupid -- it takes a lot longer to setup fine-pitch studs. Duh.

                        I notice that Enco/MSC sells Made in USA Class IIa all-thread for about what I pay for Chinese all-thread, so I'm going to order a set of 3/8"-16 and 1/2"-13 to keep on-hand.
                        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by hardtail
                          That is a beautiful table.........drool...... and really a great price.

                          I somehow missed (along with everone else) a 10" Yuasa on ebay about 6 months ago for .99c opening bid, looked fairly clean but as you say what are the internals like? Anyway it must have sent a little chill down the sellers spine as he dodged that bullet and held onto it for awhile. He relisted it 2 weeks ago at $500 buy it now or highest offer, I offered $250 and he said I was too cheap......he never realized it was $249.01 more than I should have paid for it.......oh well the pursuit continues.........LOL
                          It didnt look like that at all when I got it... a lot of muck and some very thin surface rust made it look a dog... but that what makes an Ebay bargain out of a drehtisch 2.940. The seller was dealer who thought £35 a reasonable price...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            All thread or ready rod may do in a pinch on short spans but I'm not a fan of it........go to your local bolt supply and ask for B7 studs, they are for pressure vessels and flanges and come in a variety of sizes and lengths and are about 1000 times superior, they have heavy nuts for them as well and will be stamped bearing an ASME designation.
                            Opportunity knocks once, temptation leans on the doorbell.....

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Just a thought

                              Originally posted by ckelloug
                              derekm,

                              Good Point.

                              Really, allthread probably makes more sense. I guess I should head for the hardware store and see what I can find. I understand that hardened stuff is nicer because it can be tightened down tighter without distorting but practically speaking, at least this week, all I need to do is mill 8 round o-ring groove corners on a specific part and I am still waiting for a couple of the other bits and pieces to arrive.

                              --Cameron
                              Cameron.

                              I'd be a little (a lot/very actually) cautious about tightening down too hard or "over-torquing" as there are a couple of "mechanics" problems here. Torquing the nut/bolt to pull the job down is one thing, but the force/reaction in the "T"-slot is very considerable as it is tending to pull the sides of the T-slot upward which places quite a large "stress-raiser" at the upper internal corners of any T-slot - your rotary table included.

                              If you "have to" "lay into" the torque you need to re-consider either the set-up or the cutting load. It would not be the first time I've seen "T"-slot tops "pulled out" of the table or the table distorted.

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