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Tangential Toolholder: Practical Self v.s. Emotional Self. A Play in 2 Acts

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  • Liger Zero
    replied
    ...What?

    Originally posted by ammcoman2
    I, too, didn't have the knowhow/facilities to make a square hole so I bought a square hole sleeve and used (98% tin/2% silver) solder to fix it in place.

    Geoff
    Square drill-bit. Enco's got 'em in all sizes.

    Leave a comment:


  • GadgetBuilder
    replied
    Now that you point it out, the sleeve is hinted at in one of your pictures.

    Nifty idea, I only considered making the slot with a saw but since an insert can be made in two parts and brazed in place this allows other approaches. Wish I'd thought of that...

    John

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Geoff-
    Did your new tool cure the chatter problems on your Atlas lathe?

    -Doozer (former Atlas 10" owner)

    Leave a comment:


  • ammcoman2
    replied
    I, too, didn't have the knowhow/facilities to make a square hole so I bought a square hole sleeve and used (98% tin/2% silver) solder to fix it in place.

    Geoff

    Leave a comment:


  • gregl
    Guest replied
    Thanks. Geoff, for the pix. A well-done holder and good pix, too.

    The final scene of ACT II happened today. I'll post ACT II in full as a new thread by the end of the week.

    Leave a comment:


  • GadgetBuilder
    replied
    Hi Geoff,

    An elegant design, beautifully machined. Trickier than it looks - I assumed there was a third saw cut underneath to provide flex. My eyeball engineering told me it wouldn't flex enough without this extra cut (even though I didn't see a way to make the cut) - so much for my intuition. Not sure my skills are up to copying it, particularly the square hole for the bit.

    Thanks for making the effort to take pictures during what must be a very busy time for you, moving is always a major drain on time and energy.

    John

    Leave a comment:


  • websterz
    replied
    Originally posted by ammcoman2
    Here are some more details of the slitting saw cuts that I made to enable some flex in the clamping section.







    Let me know if you need more details.

    Regards,

    Geoff
    Very nice work!!

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  • ammcoman2
    replied
    Here are some more details of the slitting saw cuts that I made to enable some flex in the clamping section.









    Let me know if you need more details.

    Regards,

    Geoff
    Last edited by ammcoman2; 12-03-2011, 06:30 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ammcoman2
    replied
    Hi John,

    I am in the middle of a move - the computer is still at the old place but the lathe is at the new one.

    I won't promise but will try to take a photo tomorrow and bring it back here to post. The sawcut does not compromise the bottom section of the toolholder but I can't remember the details. Hopefully a photo will help.

    Geoff

    Leave a comment:


  • GadgetBuilder
    replied
    I've built two tangential holders and vote for making one - it'll give you a chance to use your shaper again

    I'd also vote for setting the tool so it can turn and face without swiveling the QCTP - I grind most all my tools so the QCTP angle stays fixed.

    I built the monolithic style first and then built one to fit a regular toolholder. The one to fit the regular toolholder sticks out more than most bits so it entails cranking the CS when using different tools.

    I plan to make another monolithic type to replace it and am interested in the one Goeff showed. However, I don't see how the saw cuts were done to get them to intersect without weakening it - any chance of an explanation and/or a picture of the bottom, Goeff?

    John


    Pictures here: http://www.gadgetbuilder.com/ToolHolders.html#Tangent

    Leave a comment:


  • tony ennis
    Guest replied
    probably 'cause I'm too weak to get the screw tight enough.
    Dude. Spot weld. Works great for lugnuts too.



    Hope this helps!

    Leave a comment:


  • Blacksmith
    replied
    I just bought one. I think they get a bad rap because they are designed as an all purpose one size fits all thing, and seem designed to replace skill by making it really easy to sharpen. But if you forget their targeting of the market, and look in something like a KBC catalog where there are a loads of toolholders for insane prices, and limited uses, it isn't so bad.

    So far it really works well, and they really work well for the kind of work I do with the lathe I have. I have a slew of other bits and holders, that cut fine, but this one takes a lot less sharpening. I have 4 south bends, and they came with a bunch of original cutters, used by guys that had these lathes before me. The bits that alway seem pretty useful are the one with a very narrow point and a high back cut angle. The diamond tool holder naturally takes that shape on, and it is infinetly sharpenable without cutting away the useable portion of the tool. There is a ton less stone dust in the air after a fresh diamond bit is shaped than there would be shaping one of those ye' olde ones.

    I haven't tried the threading yet. I just hope it is as good.

    There is only one thing about it that isn't so good, and that is the price. I managed to get one direct from OZ when the Can. dollar was at a favourable rate, and that made it a lot cheaper for me to acquire. If one looks at it as a part of getting some improved tooling into a lathe that was a steal in the first place... It's not too bad a price overall.

    Leave a comment:


  • lazlo
    replied
    Nice job on "Aloris" tangential toolholder Lew

    Do you use it, or do you prefer a conventional tool?

    Leave a comment:


  • Lew Hartswick
    replied
    You don't need plans just wing it. :-)
    http://home.earthlink.net/~lhartswic...urning-facing/
    like I did, works good .
    :-)
    ...lew...

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Tangential tool-holder

    Get a standard common lathe tool-holder to suit the tools bit size/s you want to use, cut the head off it, rotate the head 90 degree (so that the fastening screw is to the right), grind/shape the head and shank to suit the front clearance angle you require and weld it together.

    One quick, cheap "tangential" cutter = done and ready to go.

    Leave a comment:

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