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OT: Windows Vista Crash

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  • OT: Windows Vista Crash

    I was ordering parts yesterday online when my computer crashed. It would attempt to restart then the screen would go blank. The local computer shop told me they would have to reload Vista and I would lose everything. I nearly fell over when I was told that because I hadn't backed up my accounting program in a couple weeks. Long story short I got online with another computer and found out how to repair Vista and I lost nothing. Has anyone else had trouble like this? I have heard horror stories about Vista but this is the first problem I have encountered in over a year. This is a lesson learned for me-back up your files often.

  • #2
    I have been using vista ultimate 64bit for over a year, and no serious complaints. If I had to complain, its a resource hog and need a machine to match.

    Knowing how to do a repair install is a good thing... and most computer repair shops dont know ****...

    Unless a hard drive completely failed (physically failed such as a broker platter or armature), you almost NEVER lose the information on it.. it might be a bit of a task to recover, but its there.

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    • #3
      I have been using vista for about 6 months and hate it. Not because of crashes, just can't get used to the way it is setup. I liked xp so much better but vista is widows future so I switched. It it was not for me running solidworks I might have got a mac.

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      • #4
        Vista

        I needed a new laptop a year ago, just about the time Vista slithered out. The other choice was XP, which I have always avoided before, having used Win2000 since it came out. I put about 1 week into hunting down all the obnoxious improvements that could be switched off or replaced with "classic" choices. Since then, it hasn't been too bad except Vista seems to die or pout if it isn't rebooted every few days. My wife also bought a new laptop, but left Vista more or less stock and her laptop just crawls along.

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        • #5
          The real problem is the computer store people. In the decade I had my computer store running I never told a customer that they would lose everything unless there was a catastrophic hard drive failure. When they tell you that they have to wipe the system instead of finding and fixing the issue it is a direct indication of their lack of competence.

          As for problems in Vista, why should it be any different than all the preceeding operating systems that Microsoft has released? I don't recall hearing about any mass firings at Microsoft when they began Vista development. You may not be aware that they are already working on the successor to Vista. I have a feeling that Vista is going to have a fairly short run in the market.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #6
            Everyone bitches about Vista being bad, it won't run their older software or on there older computer (anything more than 18 month's is old) or printers etc. or it crashes and they should have bought a Mac.

            Well when the Mac OS10 came out it did exactly the same thing older computers weren't compatible and OS9 or earlier software didn't work with it.

            If your computer crashes all the time then it is probably a problem with the hardware compatibility, driver problems or some piece of software like a small utility program that is causing the problem not Vista itself. I have been running Vista almost since it came out with no problems.

            People also complain that security is to much trouble with Vista, always having to type in a password etc. This is how a proper system should work whether it Mac, Linux Unix or Vista. People have just gotten used to not having proper security on home PC's and don't like being forced to get with the "security" program.

            It's a crappy world we live in and proper security is the price we will have to pay before long if you want to be on the net 'cause there are changes coming that will enforce it.

            I currently scan my system with 5 anti-virus/spy ware programs 3 anti- root kit programs and have hardware and software firewalls. Also I have the user rights locked down to limit intrusion problems.
            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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            • #7
              Originally posted by loose nut
              People also complain that security is to much trouble with Vista, always having to type in a password etc. This is how a proper system should work whether it Mac, Linux Unix or Vista. People have just gotten used to not having proper security on home PC's and don't like being forced to get with the "security" program.
              I disagree, proper security is when you let the user chose, and inform them what that choice means. The problem with this scenario is that to many people click first, and complain later.
              -Dan S.
              dans-hobbies.com

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              • #8
                The vast majority of computer users do no have enough knowledge of the security issues or of the operating system to make an informed choice. In most cases "not enough knowledge" means none at all. If a choice is given that has the option to lower security levels the user will often take the choice that appears to offer the least complication. A good example is allowing Windows to start up without requiring a password.

                For a system to be secure security must be an inherent part of the system, not the user. It is the system programmer that determines how secure a system is. The only time that the user can be relied on to make proper choices is when training and supervision are in place for all users. Even then user based security is a poor substitute for operating system inherent security.

                For example, the number of security holes in Windows XP that have been found since RTM is probably in the range of 1000 or so. Contrast that with Free BSD which in 9 or so years has been found to have two (2) remotely exploitable flaws.
                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by loose nut
                  Well when the Mac OS10 came out it did exactly the same thing older computers weren't compatible and OS9 or earlier software didn't work with it.
                  Not wanting to derail the focus on Vista but...

                  When Mac OSX was introduced in '99, in recognition of the legacy software problem, Apple enabled the user to have both OSX and system 9 installed in the one computer with both being able to run side by side.

                  The computer switches seamlessly from one system to the other depending on which application is being used.

                  9 years after the introduction of OSX I'm still using a dual system Mac on which I run a few old programmes - probably 20 year old system 6 stuff - which still run flawlessly on system 9.

                  Just a thought, is it theoretically possible to run XP and Vespa side by side in the one computer?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bob ward
                    Not wanting to derail the focus on Vista but...
                    Just a thought, is it theoretically possible to run XP and Vespa side by side in the one computer?
                    If you use a boot loader you can run different versions of windows, Linux and other systems (yes there are "other" operating systems) on the same computer. Each OS is loaded onto a different "C" partition, this is managed by the boot loader and then you can boot up what ever system you want. That's the short version explanation.
                    Last edited by loose nut; 12-20-2008, 10:38 AM.
                    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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                    • #11
                      I don't know about Vespa but it is trivial to run Linux along side of Windows. Also, Microsoft offers Virtual PC 2007 for free. It can run most X86 operating systems simultaneously with most versions of Windows as long as the machine is equipped with the appropriate amount of ram that each operating system needs.'

                      http://www.microsoft.com/windows/pro.../overview.mspx

                      :note

                      Simultaneous means what it says. Each operating system shares time slices on the CPU(s) and switching while running is clicking on an icon.
                      Last edited by Evan; 12-20-2008, 10:40 AM.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #12
                        Only real drawback I've ever found to running a virtual machine is that the virtual machine is limited by the capabilities of the host operating system.
                        If you don't have drivers for a device for the host, you can't use it in the VM.

                        Always thought they should write them so the VM could hook directly into the actual hardware rather than through the hosts drivers. Not being a programmer, it seems there must be a good reason for not doing it that way.

                        Ken.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by kendall
                          Only real drawback I've ever found to running a virtual machine is that the virtual machine is limited by the capabilities of the host operating system.
                          When you create a virtual machine, you're inserting another layer of software, the "Hypervisor", below the operating systems you're virtualizing. So if you have Windows and Mac OSX running at the same time, the Hypervisor software (from VMWare, or Parallels, or Connectix...) is sitting underneath both, intercepting the operating-system calls to the actual hardware, and re-routing the calls so that each OS thinks it has exclusive access to the hardware.

                          So the virtualized operating systems can't access the hardware directly, and if you have software that requires direct access to the hardware, like Mach3, it won't work in a virtual machine.

                          For the same reason, 3D acceleration doesn't work in a virtual machine, because you'd have to virtualize each of the OpenGL and/or Direct3D calls. So you can't run most games in a virtual machine, and it's a big performance hit to run CAD like Solidworks in a virtual machine, because the CAD software can't use the hardware acceleration - it has to punt to 2D mode.

                          Always thought they should write them so the VM could hook directly into the actual hardware rather than through the hosts drivers. Not being a programmer, it seems there must be a good reason for not doing it that way.
                          The other issue with Virtual Machines is that, since the virtualization software has to intercept and re-route all the OS calls that used to be direct to the hardware, there's a pretty big performance degradation. On a non hardware-accelerated system, on average there's a 30% performance hit for running the application in a virtual machine.

                          I was one of the architects at Intel who designed Vanderpool Technology, which is Intel's hardware virtualization acceleration. This greatly reduces the virtualization overhead, but it's still in the 5 - 10% range, depending on how many hardware calls the software is making. Vanderpool also doesn't solve the issue of not having exclusive access to the raw hardware.

                          http://www.intel.com/pressroom/archi...050120comp.htm
                          Last edited by lazlo; 12-20-2008, 01:20 PM.
                          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                          • #14
                            The problem isn't Vista, it's your hard drive or motherboard. Something on your computer is causing a hardware error that corrupted some of your data. Vista can do a self repair from the install CD, just like XP can. Reinstalling/reformatting will indeed wipe out all your data, but a repair leaves the data and only fixes corrupt operating systems files.

                            The computer shop you used is full of idiots and you should never take your computer back there. Seeing as how the problem has already occurred once, there's a good chance it will happen again. If I was you, I would backup all of my data and buy a new hard drive to replace the current one.

                            If you really want data security without daily off-site backups, start looking into raid arrays. I run a raid 5 system. It requires three hard drives, only gives you the storage space of two, but keeps you from losing data if one drive goes bad. If you do lose a drive, you don't lose any data. Simply replace the bad drive with a new one and the raid array will rebuild itself, giving you the cheapest on-site data security. Most motherboards available these days have built in raid controllers (so it only costs you some time and a total of three hard drives). If you have a Dell or similar pre-built computer, ignore the raid setup, they buy cheap components which don't support raid arrays.

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                            • #15
                              I didn't get the Vista disk with this computer. A friend of mine that is a computer wizard told me this is common practice. Just another way to screw the unknowing consumer. For those that want to know there is a built in repair that does not require the Vista disk. Upon starting your computer continually press F8 until a screen comes up. This screen will give several options-can't remember them but a repair option is one of them. Follow the prompts. It's pretty simple. If I can do it anyone can.

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