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  • Oh boy...the things they bring me...

    Hope I don't hurt anyones feelings here...
    anyway..a building contractor with 25 years experience shows up the other day..wringing his hands.
    He's building a house for some people and has to have it done in a few weeks.
    This guy builds some pretty cool houses...the ones with all the wonky multi level roof pitches etc.
    That's why they hire him...he's very good at what he does.
    He gets the thing all up...roof buttoned up..inspector passes it.
    Ooops...inspector with 5 years carpentering experience changes his mind.
    Nope...he has to put up metal hangers where all the joists meet.
    OK...so where do we get these hangers from???
    They are so whacked out...no big company would build them without proper engineering and testing. Would take at least a year.
    The guy can't believe this...he's never been asked...or even heard of using hangers on this complicated of a deal. The gist of the thing...the weight alone would hold all these in place. It is all on top of a center supporting wall. Where can the roof go??? So he spends a couple days making these...so I can copy them from 1/4" and 3/16" plate. The "inspector"..with no knowledge of welding or fabricating...will "approve" these for him...LOL
    I'm still cutting...omg...there's not one straight angle in the whole bunch...all weird compound stuff.
    Welding it together is going to be a big challenge...lotta bracing...lotta time.
    I'm glad I'm not footing the bill for this. This is just a few of them..there's about 6 more after these four are built..



    Russ
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

  • #2
    Hum,this is one of those times where a press brake would come in handy.At least it would reduce the seam count.

    It's not that weird to me though,I've built a stainless steel pig before
    I just need one more tool,just one!

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm sure the contractor didn't hurt your feelings by going up there and making all the patterns.

      An awful lot of measuring, what with all the various angles and plate sizes!
      A lot of steel too, never mind all of the cuts.

      Oh well that's the price you pay to live in a funky house. You won't need to heat the shop for a day or two either...your welding equipment should keep it toasty in there for a while. Beats shoveling snow wonderin when the next job will come in.
      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

      Location: British Columbia

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      • #4
        A building inspector here required a friends pole building to be guy wired to buried cement anchors .
        Gene

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        • #5
          Down here as far as I understand, the inspectors can't do much like this if you have signed drawings from a certified Professional Engineer that the structure will meet its requirements without the stupid reinforcements. Without a P.E. signature then you're at the mercy of the rules in the code and the insane inspector's discretion because it's not an engineered structure for which the PE's license and arse are on the line.

          I do know however that Southern Building Code requires reinforcements called "Hurricane Ties" if you are in a hurricane zone where the building parts could actually experience lifting forces. These reinforcements would never see any force at all except in a hurricane situation.

          Y'all are absolutely certain that nothing in the simpson-strongtie catalog will even remotely work right?

          Regards,
          Cameron

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          • #6
            Cameron...I am just repeating what the contractor told me. He's been looking for a solution to this for 2 weeks....there is nothing out there that could do the job for him. You'd actually have to see them to believe it... Darin...yup..I'm glad he built the patterns. He actually did a very good job of them.
            I'm getting "angleitis" now tho...yeesh! And the waste factor keeps growing. I'm trying to save the guy as much as I can in materials but there aren't two parts on any that are the same...width or hieght. And very few angles are the same either.
            Last edited by torker; 12-19-2008, 04:24 PM.
            I have tools I don't even know I own...

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ckelloug
              I do know however that Southern Building Code requires reinforcements called "Hurricane Ties" if you are in a hurricane zone where the building parts could actually experience lifting forces. These reinforcements would never see any force at all except in a hurricane situation.
              That's exactly right, and for good reason. But Spokane Wa. is not in a hurricane zone.

              Thus the bizarre requirement in this case. There are a hundreds of open faced, pole construction, equipment shelters here. And none I have seen are guy wired.

              I would file a complaint against the inspector. That's what was done here, and the issue has not come up since.
              Gene

              Comment


              • #8
                Building Inspectors!

                When my house was under construction, I wanted to install 12 volt door bells. I put the wiring in while the electrical work was being done. Well the electrical inspector came unglued and threatened to cancel the entire building permit because I did electrical work with out a permit.

                OK so I go and get the $50 electrical permit for the front and back door bells. All well and good. Then after we are in the house, the inspector comes back to check on the work I did. He went into the basement and after a few minutes he was yelling about have us evicted from the unsafe house for the wiring violations. I went down to see what the problem was and he points to a big ball of wires that were on top of the furnace duct work. He said that was completely against code and that I did such a sloppy job of installing the wiring.

                I proceed to show him where the wires were the I installed and the 12 volt transformer location. The big ball wires was NOT something I had done. It was done by the installers of the furnace electrical systems. When told him that the ball of wire was not mine but done by the furnace installers, he said, "Well in that case, the wiring is OK."

                Needless to say I have no respect for electrical building inspectors.

                Bill
                Bill

                Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

                Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

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                • #9
                  When the inspectors are not idiots, they can be helpful.

                  Mine actually came back later in the day giving me time to quickly correct a mistake when I ran the 400A service for the house wrong and was going to freeze to death if I didn't get the power back that day. Kudos to James from the Huntsville Electrical Inspection Department. Not all inspectors are kind to DIYers and many locations don't let residents rewire services, much less 400A commercial services on houses with dual disconnect switches.

                  Good work build those plates torker!

                  --Cameron

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Russ, you have all my sympathy.It is probably too late now, but 12 ga sheet would be more than adequate for all of those brackets. I(f you doubt me, look at all the Simpsom Timber brackets at the building supply. I dont think they are more than 16 ga. The hooker is that if it is not spelled out in the Provincial Building Code, then the inspector really has "a duty of care" to require that an engineer design and seal the work.
                    Remember, the Building Code goes to great lengths to specify MANY ways to assemble a building. In the preamble, it also says that these are not the ONLY ways. It THEN says, if you dont do it the way we show you, then you MUST provide supporting data to, in effect, defend your way. Enter the structural design engineer.
                    Where things go crazy sometimes, and we old farts rant about "young upstarts with only six years experience which is actually only two years three times over!" It is the fact that new methods supersede old ones which do work, BUT ARE NO LONGER IN THE CODE. Any 1960 code will have a Spiking Table for the number and size of spikes to fasten a joist or rafter to a header. It will also show the design of a leger strip or ribbon board as an alternate to spiking. These methods still work but your building inspector wont recognize them. There is nothing new but what is forgotten.
                    Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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                    • #11
                      Hang on..don't shoot the messanger. I have no problem with building codes etc. I am all for them.
                      I've made a lot of money over the years..rebuilding old houses.
                      I have cursed the pre building code days many times.
                      I also don't have a problem with MOST building inspectors.
                      In this case...I am taking a very experienced builders word.
                      Duffy...you are right. A "factory" hanger would be made out of far lighter material.
                      The inspectors reason for calling for 3/16" plate was... "Most people can't weld anything lighter."
                      I have tools I don't even know I own...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by torker
                        The inspectors reason for calling for 3/16" plate was... "Most people can't weld anything lighter."
                        That jerk is a little tin God. The 3/16" bravo sierra comment of his clued me in.

                        Clutch

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                        • #13
                          Since when is low voltage wiring covered under electrical code?

                          Bill
                          In section110.26,(NEC) anything 30 volts AC or less is not covered.
                          I think your inspector was on some weed.

                          Rich

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                          • #14
                            I didn't notice where he has you putting any holes in the plates for the fasteners.

                            Its going to be a shame if he comes back later with his tail between his legs and asks you to PLEASE, PLEASE drill the various holes he has marked in the already welded up steel plates. Particularly if the holes have to align with one another for through bolts.

                            I hate to suggest you ask him about holes BEFORE you weld them all up.
                            It might open up a whole nother bucket of snakes for both him and you. Be sure to adjust your price accordingly.

                            I hope you at least have a plasma cutter to help with the cutting.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dave5605
                              I didn't notice where he has you putting any holes in the plates for the fasteners.

                              Its going to be a shame if he comes back later with his tail between his legs and asks you to PLEASE, PLEASE drill the various holes he has marked in the already welded up steel plates. Particularly if the holes have to align with one another for through bolts.

                              I hate to suggest you ask him about holes BEFORE you weld them all up.
                              It might open up a whole nother bucket of snakes for both him and you. Be sure to adjust your price accordingly.

                              I hope you at least have a plasma cutter to help with the cutting.
                              Dave..LOL! Ya...there's lots of holes. This guy is one of the guys who you just love to work with.
                              He is a fanatic about detail.
                              And you got it...there are lots of thru holes (plate to plate) at weird angles that I have to figure out.
                              Yup..I have a plasma cutter...too bad the almost new Hypertherm is acting up...shoulda kept my ol Lincoln.
                              I have tools I don't even know I own...

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