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  • The start of an XMAS gift for the forum

    Since it's been freezing outside I can't work in the shop. Thus to occupy my free time I've started making wall charts (PDF) as an XMAS present for my fellow forum members (I can use them to ). Thus far I have the following charts:

    1. drill size chart with decimal & mm equivalents
    2. Metric tap hole sizes 50% engagement through 80% in 5% increments
    3. Unified tap hole sizes 50% engagement through 80% in 5% increments
    4. Drilling SFPM for different materials
    5. Single point turning SFPM for different materials


    I'm having a hard time coming up with one for milling though. The only thing I've come up with that's not an application is what Niagara recommends.
    http://www.niagaracutter.com/techinf...eed/index.html

    Is cross referencing Machinability, the only simple method for getting a SFPM starting point for milling?
    -Dan S.
    dans-hobbies.com

  • #2
    I got around to posting the first of the wall charts today. You can download them from my website here:
    http://www.dans-hobbies.com/2008/12/...g-wall-charts/

    I also determined that my 14th edition(1951?) "Machinery's handbook" is a little out of date with regards to feeds & speeds for milling. I did find a 27th edition online (Google books), so I will have the other charts knocked out in another day or two.
    -Dan S.
    dans-hobbies.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Dan,

      What size are the charts. The bigger the better, something about the print getting smaller or the arms getting shorter.

      -brian
      -brian

      Hello, my name is brian and I'm a toolaholic.

      Comment


      • #4
        Dan, nice! A speeds and feeds chart would be great

        By the way, I was at Office Depot today shipping Christmas packages, and noticed they have a large format laminator.
        Turns out they'll laminate full-sized posters for $1.90 per square foot. So figure a 6 square foot Starrett decimal equivalence chart would cost $12 to laminate.

        Brian: PDF's are vector graphics, so you can blow up Dan's charts to any size you want.
        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by carlquib
          What size are the charts. The bigger the better, something about the print getting smaller or the arms getting shorter.
          Currently each chart is designed to fit on standard letter size printer paper. The font size is 10pt Arial. If people want, I can post the original excel files. You could then print them out as large as you desire.

          Once I get them all done, I think I'm going to lay them all out out to fit on a 36"x36" poster that can be printed out at Kinko's.
          -Dan S.
          dans-hobbies.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks, Dan. Nice idea, those charts look handy. I enjoyed poking around your website.

            Great thought, thanks for offering that up.

            -Al

            Comment


            • #7
              fractions to mm to inches chart,

              I dont have a printer ........gave up a long time ago, on them, after my third one expired just after the warranty ran out..just like the rest of them.

              all the best.markj

              Comment


              • #8
                Excellent! Thank you very much. I was looking for some charts that I liked not only for myself but also for my brother-in-law who is just getting started in the world of machining!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Particularly good would be speeds and feeds for HSM machines....

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Everyone has their own favourite chart, this is mine.
                    I like this one as everything is on the one chart is sequence so you can see what's closest to where you want to be.



                    large size file for printing is here

                    http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/decimal.jpg


                    This one came out of a toolmakers catalogue.

                    .
                    Last edited by John Stevenson; 12-21-2008, 01:54 PM.
                    .

                    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Teenage_Machinist
                      Particularly good would be speeds and feeds for HSM machines....
                      I'm reworking the truing speed chart at the moment; adjusting the hss speed and feed is easy. The carbide speeds and feeds are a real pain, because of the half a** way they laid it out.


                      what kind of feeds and speeds are we talking?
                      Last edited by dan s; 12-21-2008, 04:19 PM.
                      -Dan S.
                      dans-hobbies.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Ok

                        I think I have the truing speeds spreadsheet done. Feed and DOC are variables (within bounds).

                        Before I release it though, can someone tell me if the carbide speeds for brass, bronze, & aluminum look right? They seam high to me.

                        -Dan S.
                        dans-hobbies.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Aluminum may be turned at whatever speed your machine can do. There is no maximum limit.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yea, I have just never seen calculated speeds that high before. How about the bronze, isn't 445 fpm high for hard bronze? I have never turned it but i thought it was supposed to be hard as he**

                            I'm at work, but if i remember correctly these speeds are based on feed .01" doc .1"


                            Originally posted by Evan
                            Aluminum may be turned at whatever speed your machine can do. There is no maximum limit.
                            -Dan S.
                            dans-hobbies.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Those speed aren't that high. I turn brass as fast as my lathe will go. I slow down a bit on bearing bronze so it doesn't spray chips across the shop.
                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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