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Metal Spinning Videos

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  • Metal Spinning Videos

    While cruising around the web looking for info on metal spinning lathes, I found these two videos. At the bottom of the page you'll see a video of a hydraulic spinning lathe, and one of a manual lathe.

    The guy doing the manual spinning doesn't waste any time...and his pieces don't fly apart like mine do!

    Note the absence of any protective gear, the shirttail out, and his aluminum colored hand.

    http://www.maneklalexports.com/Engli...cleCutSpin.htm

  • #2
    Fascinating to watch the manual operation, about 1min 20sec from metal on to bowl off.

    What sort of RPM are we likely talking about for that item?

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    • #3
      Speaking of no protective gear...

      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #4
        Originally posted by bob ward
        What sort of RPM are we likely talking about for that item?
        500-600 rpm

        Thanks for the video I love spinning

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        • #5
          Spinning Question

          Just curious. When starting with just a flat disc, how does the operator center the disc?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 34Ford
            Just curious. When starting with just a flat disc, how does the operator center the disc?
            You can see the spinner on the video with a stick ,he start the lathe applying a small pressure and this will center the blank , I do no know why they don't use a centering apparatus It is just 2 rollers adjust a the proper hight

            I can't believe they trow the work on the floor

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            • #7
              It looked to me like he "lightly" clamped the disk, then smacked the disk several times to true it up in the lathe. Then he tightened up the hold of the part.
              I am not young enough to know everything

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              • #8
                I would imagine any one would become an expert doing the number a week that he is doing!!
                Must be pretty soft aluminium to start with not so clever if you have to keep annealing it!!

                Peter
                I have tools I don't know how to use!!

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                • #9
                  I bet these guys are being paid by the part. They couldn't get away with these working conditions in this country.

                  Interesting to see the parts on the hydraulic machine are deep drawn prior to spinning. They might be run through an annealing process before the spinning.

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                  • #10
                    Chances are it is 1100 series aluminum. It doesn't work harden at all. It's almost as ductile as gold. Both gold and aluminum exhibit around 45% elongation at break in tensile testing. Next best alloy is something in the 5000 series which are made for deep drawing and stamping. Either type will not need annealing for that sort of work.
                    Last edited by Evan; 12-22-2008, 04:31 PM.
                    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Evan
                      Chances are it is 1100 series aluminum.
                      Considering the working conditions in that sweat shop, it's probably whatever they could sweep into the hearth.

                      This is video I posted here awhile ago of spinning aluminum pots on a modern CNC lathe. In the second-half of the video, the guy is spinning a light reflector on a manual lathe.
                      This is Crown Cookwear in Canada -- stark contrast in working conditions.

                      Last edited by lazlo; 12-22-2008, 02:18 PM.
                      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lazlo
                        Considering the working conditions in that sweat shop, it's probably whatever they could sweep into the hearth.

                        This is video I posted here awhile ago of spinning aluminum pots on a modern CNC lathe. In the second-half of the video, the guy is spinning a light reflector on a manual lathe.
                        This is Crown Cookwear in Canada -- stark contrast in working conditions.


                        That CNC is not turning at 2000 rpm for that job don't believe every thing you see on TV

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                        • #13
                          Thats nice, those funnels all spun in one piece, never seen that before.

                          Peter
                          I have tools I don't know how to use!!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DR
                            I bet these guys are being paid by the part. They couldn't get away with these working conditions in this country.

                            Interesting to see the parts on the hydraulic machine are deep drawn prior to spinning. They might be run through an annealing process before the spinning.
                            That occured to me, too. Watching the work ethic involved, just about have to be doing piecework. Lots of skill there....what appears to be quality work, and fast!

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                            • #15
                              Considering the working conditions in that sweat shop, it's probably whatever they could sweep into the hearth.
                              1100 series is electrical aluminum, common everywhere as wire. They aren't stupid and know what alloys can be spun. They may not know the name of the alloy but I guarantee they know what works.
                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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