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OT maybe. Tons of little parts though and a cool video

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  • OT maybe. Tons of little parts though and a cool video

    Ran across this you-tube video today and I thought it was pretty cool. Looks like the video is probably from the 70s and the technology shown in it is from a much earlier era that's near & dear to my heart, and likely most of you folks too.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3FTa...eature=related

    I think the video is a little gem. Hope you enjoy it.
    Hint: it's pneumatic NC

    edited to add that I checked and the company is still in business and producing this product today along with other stuff, though I wonder if they've updated their equipment.
    Last edited by vinito; 12-27-2008, 08:30 PM.

  • #2
    Very Cool!!

    Comment


    • #3
      Well, it's an Apple II, so it's either late seventies or early eighties- though it's entirely possible- if not likely- they continued to use that same PC system for years afterwards.

      However, it's not too new, as the one young lady at the roller (towards the end) had what looked like an early Walkman, so if I had to say, I'd bet the video couldn't be any newer than '85 or '86 at most.

      Still, fascinating stuff.

      Doc.
      Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

      Comment


      • #4
        In the video the narrator makes a comment to the effect of "the interface between the 1980's and 1890's is done through electromagnets" so it must be 80's


        Very cool stuff! Thanks alot for posting. My dad will be interested in this too.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks,
          I have passed this on to a scrappie friend of mine that has a Gaviolli fairground organ that they take to steam rallies.

          Of more interest though was a home made machine that punches the paper rolls in the related list at the side in YouTube.

          He's always having to repair the books on this organ but they are slightly different from the player piano in that each 'page' is a cardboard page about 8" x 10" and they fan fold to make the book.

          .
          .

          Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



          Comment


          • #6
            whoda thunk ?

            how do you suppose that guy making the rolls on his fancy piano is ever going to be able to train his replacment ?

            those little nich industries are intreging as can be.

            lets see wally mart do that !

            Comment


            • #7
              Really cool video. Video's such as this make me wonder just how many businesses are still surviving on their original equipment. I doubt there are many left, but it is neat to see this operation, the equipment that is still in use, and people at work doing something that you don't see or even think of very often. I tend to think that since the company is still in business, they are probably still using much of the same equipment today as when this video was made. Once it's bought and paid for, it's not eating anything, and it works perfectly, and it ain't broke...so why fix it. The cost of upgrading would likely put them out of business. My guess is that they just keep on keeping on until something breaks, and then they either fix it or possibly purchase something more modern that they can mate up to their remaining equipment. I doubt that in that perticular business, that the demand will ever outrun their ability to supply. I thought it is neat at how they arrived at the QRS business name.
              There is no shortage of experts, the trick is knowing which one to listen to!

              Comment


              • #8
                Actually, I'd bet money that the company has upgraded, and such upgrades probably cost far less than you think.

                After all, it showed the pianist making editing changes on the computer itself- despite the relative clunkiness of the computer itself and the interface.

                It's not anywhere out of the question to then presume that one could generate the same program with a modern desktop PC (hell, using an emulator it could even still run the original Apple software) and an inexpensive electronic keyboard.

                The "master" roll- even though no longer needed in the above scenario- could be duplicated by a modern plotter, like we use to cut vinyl stickers.

                So apart from the production punching machines, producing the "master" could be done with little more than two or three grand in hardware and some relatively simple software.

                The production is another matter entirely- a plotter wouldn't be able to produce at anything close to the speed that assembly did- two strips of four sheets each per pass.

                Then again, I'd also wager that the market for the rolls is a small fraction of what it was when that video was originally made. I would imagine they make only a few hundred rolls a year now, and operate largely off of existing inventory for much of their sales. (Of piano rolls, anyway.)

                Doc.
                Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Doc Nickel
                  cut vinyl stickers.

                  Then again, I'd also wager that the market for the rolls is a small fraction of what it was when that video was originally made. I would imagine they make only a few hundred rolls a year now, and operate largely off of existing inventory for much of their sales. (Of piano rolls, anyway.)

                  Doc.
                  I suppose that depends on what is required in new songs, the fairground organ folk here in the UK try to keep up with modern tunes IF they can be transposed to book.
                  No good doing this trance crap, people just think the big end bearing has gone.

                  Malc the scrappie tries but there are only a few people doing the books here and an average book costs between £700 and £1200 pounds.

                  .
                  .

                  Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                  Comment


                  • #10
                    As long as it's not "protected content"
                    Just got my head together
                    now my body's falling apart

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Just found a video of Malcs organ [ not that ONE Tiffie ] on youtube.

                      http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=ApGHt1IclXA

                      Malc and his older brother Arthur were the main scrap contractors in Erricsons telephones, later Plessey.
                      I should thing over half my equipment has come from these guys at very favourable rates.
                      It was awesome what was being scrapped in the late 70's and 80's.
                      Nothing was sold, everything was scrapped.
                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by John Stevenson
                        Thanks,
                        I have passed this on to a scrappie friend of mine that has a Gaviolli fairground organ that they take to steam rallies.

                        Of more interest though was a home made machine that punches the paper rolls in the related list at the side in YouTube.

                        He's always having to repair the books on this organ but they are slightly different from the player piano in that each 'page' is a cardboard page about 8" x 10" and they fan fold to make the book.

                        .
                        John, Malc's organ is a Marenghi, not a Gavioli. I have met Malc quite a few times at various steam rallies as a couple of friends of mine help him looking after the organ. I didn't know that he was in the scrap business.
                        I know a man called Boz Oram, from Hampshire, I believe, who punches organ music using a hand machine one hole at a time, I have seen him doing it, it looks a tedious and boring job and must take an hour to produce one minute of music! I'm sure that Malc will know him as well.

                        Malc.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Malc,
                          Yes my mistake although on another site it does say "With Gaviolli façade "

                          Malc is retired now but spent his whole life in the demolition and scrap business. I met them like most of the scrappies because we repaired most of the local scrappies trucks.

                          It was a very close knit community and once you were in with one family it soon escalated.

                          I got deeper involved with them when they branched out into steam and vintage vehicles working on the lorries and the steam roller they had. It also helped having an international heavy goods licence as they were always short of drivers to get everything to shows.

                          He comes round about once a week for a coffee whilst he wife goes shopping, ironically last time he called he was looking for a rectangular wad punch to repair some organ books but I had nothing.

                          .
                          .

                          Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thats some "memory music" If I ever heard it.
                            A lot of them I could put names on and some others that sound
                            familiar but couldn't put names on.
                            Great!
                            ...lew...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by John Stevenson
                              Just found a video of Malcs organ [ not that ONE Tiffie ] on youtube.

                              http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=ApGHt1IclXA

                              Malc and his older brother Arthur were the main scrap contractors in Erricsons telephones, later Plessey.
                              I should thing over half my equipment has come from these guys at very favourable rates.
                              It was awesome what was being scrapped in the late 70's and 80's.
                              Nothing was sold, everything was scrapped.
                              Role out the barrow ..Me and my gal .........you'd think they would upgrade them to play some modern tunes ..to keep the todays yoof interest going, wouldnt yah.

                              all the best.markj

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